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My dog, Maggie, has fear aggression, though she has never snarled or bitten. We've made a lot of progress, but when you help a dog who is nervous around people running or just a lot of people in general, you're supposed to take them to a heavy populated area and get them used to it. But Maggie has had 2 panic attacks, which I thought was impossible.

I've been taking her to these types of places, but I'm afraid that she'll suffer another panic attack. Are there any solutions?
 

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Flooding, as counter conditioning, only works in very limited, very controlled situations and is best left to a qualified behaviorist. The traditional appoach is to teach the dog that strangers are good....starting with one person at a time. Have a friend toss treats to her. The friend should not look at Maggie or talk to her....just toss treats from a distance. You're trying to change her peception. It makes no difference if she's barking or hiding.....that's not what is being 'rewarded' with treats.
Your part also dictates that you do not coax her/talk to her....she has to make this attitude change on her own. If she refuses the treats, have your friend move further away. Let her take the treats in her own good time.
 

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You need to start slowly. Don't bring her straight from an area with 3 people to a completely packed area. Slowly increase the number of people she's exposed to, and increase only when she's comfortable.
 

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Like mentioned above, take it in very small steps. Don't rush anything. It will take some time. Make sure you are also working just outside her reaction zone, and when she succeeds, praise her and give treats and walk away from the stressful area. Also, don't force it over long periods of time either. Just a few minutes per session, one or 2 times a day, will go a lot further than doing full hour sessions and stressing the dog out. They seem to work through issues faster in short sessions than longer, stressful sessions.
 

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If she has never snarled or bitten what is "agressive" about the behavior? Are you sure your dog isn't just fearful? My ACD was super stranger shy and freaked out by weird places and sounds and shadows. . .seriously, shadows :rolleyes:. I started taking her to PetCo every day and at first we just walked through the automatic doors and then right back out. She jumped a mile the first time the doors made a noise and moved and tried to run through them as fast as possible only to be faced with a second set, which made her want to run back out but then there were the first doors again! AAAAAaaaah! I made this a little game.

We would run (by run I mean briskly walk) through the first doors and then right back out. Praise and treats and happy dance! Should we try it again!? Hurry Merry lets go! Hurry hurry! Yay! You did so good!. . .You get the point right?;) I think the quick change in directions as well as me constantly demanding her attention with my voice took her attention away from her fear of the doors and let her focus on the game we were playing.

Then we would tackle the next set of doors. . .and then we walked through the doors, through a couple of isles, and then back out. All this time we STILL have not introduced the people. It has been a super positive fun game for her. We are playing "lets see how far we can go into the store without you shutting down or barking or having a heart attack." Also at this point we only did this about three times and would end it there and come back the next day. Then you add walking past someone in the store. Then build to asking someone to give dog a treat. After TONS of repeating this you can add someone petting your dog. Be sure to ask them to avoid eye contact, be relaxed, and casually but slowly pet the dogs chest and not move their hand over the dogs head or behind the dog.

Sorry for the long post but I wanted to give you a more specific example of something practical that you can do and how important the "baby steps" are.
 
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