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Hi! About a week ago we adopted a basset hound/german shepherd mix. We got him from the shelter, he had come in as a stray. He is about 2 and neutered.
Most of the time he is a real sweetheart. He is taking well to potty training. However, he likes to jump and play and mouth while we are sitting on the couch, and he is uncontrollable and way too rough. My arm is covered in welts and scratches, and I have tooth marks on my hand. He isn't growling or barring his teeth- he is very obviously just playing, but it REALLY hurts. He will not respond to 'no' in a firm voice, a yell, or a soft voice. I tried the yelp trick everyone recommends, and that just makes him go harder. I tried replacing with a toy, and he will not have it. I even tried rewarding getting him to sit and calm, but he eats the cookie and then jumps back and goes at my arm again. He will not respond to no, be gentle, get down, or sit, unless he is already calm. I am at my wits end and have no idea what else to do.
 

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Sounds like he never fully learned bite inhibition or that humans aren't giant chew toys. If yelping makes him excited find another noise. The noise will come to mark that he is being too rough. You could say ow or something similar. Then you need to withdraw your attention from him. Turn your back and cross your arms so he cant reach them. If he continues to jump or nip then leave the room. By wiyhdrawing your attention you are teaching him that the fun ends when he puts his mouth on you.
 

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We went through this when my dog was a puppy... so it was four pounds of teeth, which is a little more manageable. The yelping noise just hyped him up more. An "eh eh!" noise stopped him for a moment so that we could redirect [read: jam a toy in his mouth]. We would withdraw attention when he was biting and that helped. Our trainer recommended interacting right next to a gate or with him tethered to something so we could easily step away but still supervise him, and he couldn't come after us. Are you doing lots of training with him and making sure he's well exercised? Having him tired out should also help dampen his enthusiasm some!

Instead of trying to make him calm and reward him for it when he's nutty, try rewarding him for being calm when he's already calm, if that makes sense. If he's laying quietly in his bed, or playing with a toy, you can then give him the "quiet" command (as he's already doing the desired behavior) and then drop a treat for him. Encourage calm whenever it happens, and withdraw attention for crazies.

Also, I want to see pics! Interesting mix!
 

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Ignoring him makes him back off temporarily, but doesn't solve the permanant problem, but we'll keep trying it, practice makes perfect, and training doesn't happen overnight, so I am trying to be as patient as possible with him, especially given that he's had 2 years to set a pattern, and we have no idea if we are his first humans.
 

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We went through this when my dog was a puppy... so it was four pounds of teeth, which is a little more manageable. The yelping noise just hyped him up more. An "eh eh!" noise stopped him for a moment so that we could redirect [read: jam a toy in his mouth]. We would withdraw attention when he was biting and that helped. Our trainer recommended interacting right next to a gate or with him tethered to something so we could easily step away but still supervise him, and he couldn't come after us. Are you doing lots of training with him and making sure he's well exercised? Having him tired out should also help dampen his enthusiasm some!

Instead of trying to make him calm and reward him for it when he's nutty, try rewarding him for being calm when he's already calm, if that makes sense. If he's laying quietly in his bed, or playing with a toy, you can then give him the "quiet" command (as he's already doing the desired behavior) and then drop a treat for him. Encourage calm whenever it happens, and withdraw attention for crazies.

Also, I want to see pics! Interesting mix!
We will definitely try the different sound!
We are exercising him, but his neuter stitches are still healing, so he has to take it easy for a few more days.
I didn't think of rewarding calm when he's already calm! We'll try that, too!


 

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Ignoring him makes him back off temporarily, but doesn't solve the permanant problem, but we'll keep trying it, practice makes perfect, and training doesn't happen overnight, so I am trying to be as patient as possible with him, especially given that he's had 2 years to set a pattern, and we have no idea if we are his first humans.
We definitely went through this as well. Stick with standing up, crossing your arms, and ignoring him. If he persists, go into another room for a minute. If he reacts again when you return, go right back. It's definitely not fun, and it will feel like you aren't getting anywhere at first, but in time he'll learn that his nipping means playtime ends. Stick with it for a while. Exercise when his stitches have healed will definitely help as well. Stimulation from walks, regulated playtime with you or with other dogs, and training sessions help make for a well behaved dog when you want down time.
 

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Ignoring him makes him back off temporarily, but doesn't solve the permanant problem, but we'll keep trying it, practice makes perfect, and training doesn't happen overnight, so I am trying to be as patient as possible with him, especially given that he's had 2 years to set a pattern, and we have no idea if we are his first humans.
It will, but it could take months. Unfortunately I don't think there's a quick fix to this! Just consistency and persistence!
 

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It will, but it could take months. Unfortunately I don't think there's a quick fix to this! Just consistency and persistence!
Yep, I adopted a mouthy 2 year old myself and it took about two months for him to really get it and stop trying to chew on EVERYONE. He's still mouthy when we wrestle but much gentler than he was and we are okay with that, it's fun to us. He will only mouth other people if they start rough housing with him.

He may have gotten it faster than two months if my brother had been more consistent when he mouthed him. Sometimes my brother would ignore him and leave like I instructed and sometimes he'd play. That made the training take longer. He's my dog so my brother went into it expecting me to train him and he could just enjoy the fun side of having a dog. For the most part that is true but for bite inhibition training everyone has to be on the same page and consistent. When Jubel was mostly not chewing on me anymore but still going after my brother fairly often my brother finally really believed me. Once he got consistent Jubel understood better and poof generalized the idea of no mouthing to everyone else too. It's hard work but keep at it and he'll get it.
 

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The Yelp technique is composed of lots of little details. You can Yelp, cuss, say ouch! etc., as long as you provide a verbal marker when nipped. Then, after the verbal marker, you can wait, turn your back, or leave the room ... to escalate the level of withdrawing attention as a consequence for the undesired behavior of nipping. The process can take 3 days or more to begin to get through a puppy's thick skull ... it can take longer for an adult who is set in his ways, b/c it's a communication issue.

See if the quoted block in this link helps:
http://www.dogforums.com/first-time-dog-owner/272649-my-dog-respects-no.html#post2907025
 
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