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Otto is about a year and a half old, min pin/dachshund mix. I've had him for about 6 months, and he's always gotten along great with my cat, Khepri, who's a 2 year old sphinx cat. When we got Otto, he was very underweight, and he and the cat were pretty evenly matched in their playing. Also, he was much more timid. But now that he's put on a few much needed pounds, and gained some confidence, he kinda bowls the poor cat over. I can tell he's just playing, and half the time the cat starts it, but he doesn't seem to realize when the cat is done. It used to be that when the cat got tired of playing, he would swat Otto a good one in the head (never with claws), and Otto would back off, do a play bow, and wait to see if the cat walked away or pounced on him. But lately Otto seems to get so excited, he just doesn't stop. I can probably get video if that would help. The cat will start making a ruckus, and I will either call the dog to give Khepri a chance to run away (half the basement and the entire second floor are cat only zones), or I walk in and scoop Khepri up into my lap. But if I'm not home, I can't do that. I don't want to separate them, because they sleep together, groom each other, and really do get along, it's just that Otto doesn't know when to back off anymore, and I don't know how to teach him... Help?
 

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I really wish I had an answer for you, sorry that I do not. I do have the same problem though - my cat and dog love each other, wrestle together, and for the most part both enjoy it (I swear the cat provokes the dog most often) but I worry about scratces (especially to the eyes) and my dog is much larger than the cat and can be overwhelming/too rough..

I tried to tell her 'no' (which she understands) then reward her for stopping.. but the fun of playing (which the cat is totally on board for) is so rewarding that she continues. Its frustrating, isn't it? haha. If I ever find a solution, I'll message you :)
 

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I tend to worry a lot when it comes to my pets. Whenever the dog gets to out of hand I tell him no kitty and she has learned to leave Smokey alone. I don't involve treats because I want Josie to know that pestering Smokey is bad. not that if she does it enough then she will get attention. That said I really don't leave them alone unsupervised. If I'm going out for a short trip then I put the cats in the bedroom. If it's a long one then I put the dog in the kennel. If I were you, I would do the same until Otto started picking up on the cats clues again. Accidents happen and even a small dog can do a lot of damage to a trapped cat and vice verse. If I were you, I would pull the dog away while telling him no so he learns that it is a bad thing to aggravate the cat.
 

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For now, I would separate them when you are not home to supervise, at least until he learns some sort of "leave it" command. Even then, you may find it safer to so anyway.
 

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I monitor the situation in my house and if I feel like the cat is in a corner I reprimand the dog... but I don't nurse either of them... they get along very good but if the cat runs it brings out the play in the dog. And I find... the cat eggs him on... but will show his anger when he's had enough. I also allow the cat to go upstairs and in the basement, both places the dog can't go... gives him a place to go potty, eat, relax and upstairs to sleep without being bothered.

I know some may not agree with me but I few claws at the head usually stops the pestering dead in it's tracks. And I don't need to get involved.
 

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lol-- With Sadie and Butch-- it is usally Sadie that has to tell the cat that enough is enough!! Butch is always wanting to play, and the rougher, the better!! Silly cat anyway. No claws have ever been shown while they play,, well, not enough to do any harm.

Sorry, I dont have any real advice for you. We have the prob of letting the cat know Sadie dont want anymore!! But Sadie usally lets him know. Very gentle dog, we have. Makes me happy.
 

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heh, I'm there, doing that. Not completely solved yet, but since Caeda is still a puppy I can't be too surprised or disappointed in that. I think I may have started to build a good strategy though.
First off I used the click and treat for either no attention on the cat or positive attention (nose, etc, so long as the cat is cool). I got it mainly from Kikopup's "leave it without intimidation" vid. Same strategy. I did this when Caeda was about 10-15 weeks old or so. Kept on with treats for good interactions or lack of attention. Lots of training sessions early on.
Now I've got the cat problem too, mine is egging on the dog, starting things off, then getting her so blinded puppy hyper she isn't always stopping when she should. And it is all playing, no intent to harm, but the cat is outweighed by over 50lbs.
You might need to consider managing the cat. I HATE to admit I used a squirt gun on my cat once or twice (dog loves it, considers it a treat). She'd get that "S**t head prance" (my name for it, but I'm sure you know the one!) then sidle up to the dog and swat and run, flop on her back in the middle of the floor and whine when she got pounced on. Twice squirting her got her out of the pouncing on the dog habit. Now she'll walk up and paw, etc, but not so hyper. I hated doing it but it was the only way I could think to manage her behaviour though I gave treats when she interacted well with the dog (tried that first and it wasn't enough).
I've gone back to intense praise for good interactions, especially if it is play but not too rough. A deep growly NO and leave it if she gets too rough (drag leash helped at first when I needed to hold her back). I've come to terms that this is something that has to be done for a LONG time.
Also we have part of the house gated off so the cats can't be bothered by the dog at all there. Lots of escape routes and high up comfy spots. Corners are an issue though. The ones the cat gravitates to I've tried to make deeper, so if she wants to hide there she can do so out of reach of the dog, but luckily my dog is too big to fit into the smaller spots, might not help you too much.
Biggest difference we've seen is since we took Caeda to a doggy social this weekend. She got the rough play out of her system, possibly learned more bite inhibition and all cat-dog interactions this weekend have been positive, including the play.
Biggest suggestion overall, make sure your cat has escape routes to somewhere safe and comfy to be away from the dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Does he know a "that's enough" type of command? I think teaching him that will help.
LOL Thank you! Sometimes I think my brain just doesn't work. When Otto and I rough house, I use the word "settle" to tell him I'm done playing. I never thought to apply this to the cat. Yesterday, every time 'd hear the cat start complaining, I'd tell Otto to settle, and he would calm right down. Works like a charm.

There aren't many times when the pets are home alone, since my fiance works day shift and I work night shift. They both sleep through the night in bed with us, so other then an hour here or there for eating out or going to the store, they don't have much unsupervised playtime. So I really don't think that I'll need to separate them, but I'll keep an eye on it. So far, telling him to settle has been working perfectly!
 
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