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Hello. Our family dog which is about 6 years old don't eat dry or wet food. We have tried several dry food brands but he isn't interested at all and last year we fed him wet food a lot and I guess he got bored as he stopped eating it. He on the other hand, loves home cooked food. He is quite picky. I live in another city and he is stays with my family so I don't get to see him that much so I don't really know what he is being fed. Do you guys have any tips for what we can feed him ?
 

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Seems like he just needs some tough love. I am all for finding a food that the dog enjoys and not forcing them to eat one they can’t stand, but that does not seem to be the case with your dog. Seems like he knows he can get what everyone else is eating if he holds out long enough.

Have your family pick a food that he has eaten for at least a little while in the past, that way you know you are not starting with a food he simply hates. Put it down and give him 15 minutes to eat it. If he does not eat it pick it up and try again 2-3 times a day. NO treats or scraps. He will eat it when he is hungry. He will quickly learn that that is all he gets and holding out is pointless.

Once he is regularly eating, whether it be dry or tinned, you can switch the flavour every bag/tin to keep it a bit interesting
 

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I agree with what Sanne has suggested. How big is the dog? Some very small dogs can experience blood sugar fluctuations when not fed regularly which can sometimes be an issue when applying the tough love method to getting a dog back on kibble.

I just also want to add that, if it's something your family is open to, it is possible to create a healthy home-cooked or raw diet versus feeding kibble. However, it can be quite the undertaking and requires a lot of thought and effort to be put into the diet to make sure it is balanced. There are some pre-made options - they can be pricey depending on the size of the dog you're feeding, but they take out the risk of having an unbalanced diet. Food (pun intended) for thought.
 

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He is an Anatolian Shepherd mix so he is quite big. Do you have any dry food recommendations? Ive seen many mixed opinions on the net.
 

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I used to think a dog like this would need "tough love" until I had a dog that was made sick by many dog foods. I was buying very high end dog food.. a granular food that was touted by competitors and working dog owners. My dog even backed up on that.. I thought maybe she had EPI (Pancreatic insufficiency) but she did not present quite like that.

It was the dog food and she would not eat it because it made her ill. I did the tough love. Finally she ate it and then she had diarrhea and vomiting.. poor dog.

In the end she ate a lower quality kibble. At first it was Purina Dog Chow (not exactly your high end dog food!). Eventually I found a Nutri Source Grain Free (lamb and potato) and that worked.. until they changed it to Lamb and Pea. Now she is an old dog and she eats dog food from the Supermarket.. Rachael Ray right now. At 13 if she is happy eating that, she can eat that.

You might want to look at freeze dried raw.. or maybe raw.. or even home made dog food. It MAY be a matter of tough love, but it might be something else and that is why I posted this.
 

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He is an Anatolian Shepherd mix so he is quite big. Do you have any dry food recommendations? Ive seen many mixed opinions on the net.
Ultimately it comes down to what your dog does best on. It may be a matter of trial and error. You can contact companies and ask them to send you samples of their food so you can see if he likes them before buying a larger bag. But, as has been said, he may eventually get bored with any kibble and want a different one. At which point you can either switch it up again, or employ the tough love method.

I'm hesitant to recommend dry foods because of the DCM issue happening right now and the fact that I haven't researched it thoroughly because my dogs don't eat much kibble. I would suggest whatever food you choose, choose one that does not contain large amounts of peas or lentils. My dogs eat mostly homecooked/raw, but I do have a few kibbles I feed throughout the year. Most of their kibble is Victor Select Nutra Pro (Victor is also fairing well in the DCM issue as far as I know, so this would be a good place to start).

Some things that are healthy and easy and relatively cheap to add to dry food are sardines (in water), tuna (in water, no salt added), canned salmon, cottage cheese, and greek yogurt. You can also add low sodium broth. Sometimes just adding hot water to kibble is enough to make it more enticing, too.
 

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Agree with Sydneynicole, avoid anything that lists multiple peas/lentils/chickpea ingredients. One pea ingredient isn't something I would worry about but when you start to see lentils, pea fibre, pea protein listed in one food, I would steer clear.

I also think Victor is a good choice. Fed it to my past dog for a few months while staying in the US and she did really good on it. I would feed it again no hesitation if only it were available here. I really like Farmina ancestral grains, especially for picky eaters. The food is very strong smelling which usually makes it more enticing for dogs. Just a heads up, that brand is kind of pricey. I have fed and like Annamaet too, still use it occasionally. I have used both their grain inclusive as well as their grain free but for now I would probably stick with their grain inclusive if I was going to feed it long term.
 
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