Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I have an Aussiedoodle and a Goldendoodle. They are my parent's pets, but I practically do everything to take care of them. Right now the Aussiedoodle is heavily matted and I don't know how to get them out in the bath. I have ideas, but I'd love some advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,557 Posts
Disclaimer: I am not a groomer, just an owner of two curly dogs that I groom at home most of the time.

I'd actually suggest working on the mats dry or with a detangler spray, rather than soaked. Water can actually tighten mats and make them harder to remove. Cowboy Magic detangler was originally for horses, but I've seen it raved about in dog communities (it's not available where I live, sadly). I have much more success with a metal greyhound-style comb than any brush I've tried; the brushes just don't get down to the skin. My combs have a coarser side with wider teeth and a finer side with very narrow teeth, which is very useful when working out mats.

For very bad mats, you have a couple options. If they're not tight to the skin, you can use a dematting tool. This is essentially a row of blades you hook under the mat and slice up through it, breaking it up so it can be brushed or combed out easier. Mine looks something like this, but they come in a few different styles:


The smooth side of the blades are blunt, which is what faces towards the dog's skin, but you still need to be careful.

If you don't have one, a pair of scissors can do the same thing more slowly. I'd highly recommend a round/blunt-tip scissor for this so you can't stab the dog, especially if you haven't done this before. slide one end of the open scissors through the bottom of the mat and cut upwards, breaking it up so it can be combed out more easily.

There is also a tool called the 'mat zapper', but I've never used it myself so no advice there except that it exists.

If the mat is really close to the skin and you can't get under it, it's probably causing your dog pain and possibly skin damage already, and should just be cut off as close to the skin as possible without risking cutting the dog.

As you might have guessed, all these techniques are time consuming and might honestly be more stressful/painful to the dog than it's worth if they're really heavily matted. Sometimes the best thing you can do is shave the dog down short, if you have electric clippers. Poodle mixes can be notoriously prone to mats, so a shorter coat can make it easier to maintain long-term as well. Heck, I keep my pure poodle short most of the time, because brushing out his entire coat daily is a pain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
544 Posts
The best defense to prevent mats is a regular brushing/combing sessions.

Do not bathe the dog without brushing first. The water will aggravate the mats. DaySleepers has given you sound suggestions to remove the mats.

I offer methods to prevent them. My mini-schnauzer has long hair on his furnishings which are prone to collecting anything during our walks. I keep a constant eye on him for collected debris and remove when found.
Preventative is a weekly grooming session that begins with a 20 tooth deshedding comb, followed with a slicker brush, then finish with a greyhound comb. If a mat is found, I begin working it loose from the end of the hair towards the skin (outside to inside). If the mat is stubborn or in a sensitive location.....I will just cut it off.

This takes about 30 minutes each week. The additional tasks handled at this time are toenail trim and teeth brush
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,449 Posts
As mentioned, bathing a matted dog will just make things worse. Using a grooming spray, or even conditioner diluted with water, to wet the mats and then carefully teasing them out using the dematting tool DaySleepers mentions, or even just a comb or slicker brush will work if the mats aren't too bad.

If the dog is completely matted, then they will need to be clipped down completely with clippers. It's much kinder to the dog to get the matted coat off quickly than it is to spend hours pulling and tugging with a comb. I worked for a vet many years ago, and clipped down more than one dog who's entire coat came off in basically one piece, it was so matted.

Even if he's not completely cut down, using clippers to remove the worst of the mats is generally safer than using scissors to cut them out. If you do use scissors, then put your comb between the mat and the dog's skin, to avoid cutting the dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
As mentioned, bathing a matted dog will just make things worse. Using a grooming spray, or even conditioner diluted with water, to wet the mats and then carefully teasing them out using the dematting tool DaySleepers mentions, or even just a comb or slicker brush will work if the mats aren't too bad.

If the dog is completely matted, then they will need to be clipped down completely with clippers. It's much kinder to the dog to get the matted coat off quickly than it is to spend hours pulling and tugging with a comb. I worked for a vet many years ago, and clipped down more than one dog who's entire coat came off in basically one piece, it was so matted.

Even if he's not completely cut down, using clippers to remove the worst of the mats is generally safer than using scissors to cut them out. If you do use scissors, then put your comb between the mat and the dog's skin, to avoid cutting the dog.
The Aussiedoodle isn't completely matted, but he is matted on his stomach, armpits, and in the inside of his legs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,449 Posts
Those are really sensitive places to be working out mats. Cutting them (or at least the worst ones) out would probably be the best option.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top