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Trying to find out the best way to help my dog. Hes about an 8 months old boxer. When im home hes fine he hardly ever pees. He sleeps in my room at night for 8+ hours with no problems. The only problem is when i leave and he goes in his crate. I can be gone 1 maybe 2 hours and its always a mess. He cant seem to hold it passed 1 hour. But he can hold it for 6-8 hours while im home? How do i help him get passed this im tired of giving him baths!
 

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Trying to find out the best way to help my dog. Hes about an 8 months old boxer. When im home hes fine he hardly ever pees. He sleeps in my room at night for 8+ hours with no problems. The only problem is when i leave and he goes in his crate. I can be gone 1 maybe 2 hours and its always a mess. He cant seem to hold it passed 1 hour. But he can hold it for 6-8 hours while im home? How do i help him get passed this im tired of giving him baths!
much like my dog, your dog does not like being left alone and gets anxious (maybe even a bit of SA).

As for what to do, I'm not expert, but a part of the problem may be that your dog still think that its the pack leader. In your dogs mind, they are the leader and their followers are not supposed to leave them alone. Some dogs will act different (mine drools and whines).

Something you may want to try is locking your dog in his crate while you are home. Don't let him associate his crate with you leaving. I am doing that right now and hes drooling just a bit now and rarely whines. The whining I fixed by leaving his pronged collar on and the leash sticking outside of the cage. When he whines, I will give him a correction and tell him "quiet".
 

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Or, you could go the more humane route. Ignore him when he whines, and praise when he settles down.
because that doesn't work with my dog. He will continue to whine until you let him out.

Its obvious that you don't agree with the use of a pronged collar. thats your prerogative, but don't go and call me inhumane. I have a very strong willed dog and this collar is the best training tool to use, IMO.
 

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because that doesn't work with my dog. He will continue to whine until you let him out.

Its obvious that you don't agree with the use of a pronged collar. thats your prerogative, but don't go and call me inhumane. I have a very strong willed dog and this collar is the best training tool to use, IMO.
Easy, now. I didn't call you inhumane. I said the "ignore/praise" method was more humane. But since you brought it up: No, I don't agree with the use of the pronged collar in that situation. You're teaching him that whining equals punishment, not that being quiet is good and in his best interest. If you've got a strong willed dog, I can sympathize, but you have to be stronger willed. Either way, best of luck to you.
 

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There is WAY more to crate training than putting a dog in a crate and shutting the door. I am not sure what Viperown05 has done in that regard and hesitate to give advice of any kind directly addressing the problem without knowing more.

I am going to assume that the dog has never been properly crate trained. Lets start with that. I would feed this dog in the crate (unless you are overcoming food guarding.. another issue). Leave the door open. Give your dog treats in the crate.. and get a Kong and put peanut butter in it and give that to the dog in the crate.. ALL with the DOOR OPEN.

The object is to make that crate an inviting den.

Put the crate in a room where you spend your evenings. Computer room, TV room.. whatever.. and start to shut the door with the dog in the crate (after he has gone in for a treat). Stay right next to the crate with the door shut and your BACK to the dog. Most dogs will sit. As soon as your dog sits, open the door and say a release word (the one you use in training is good).

Eventually extend the time the dog is crated with you IN THE ROOM. When he settles down, open the door. When he settles in the crate do not open the door immediately.. toss him a small treat and then wait until he has settled again before opening the door. The object is for him to understand good things happen to dogs in crates with the door shut.

Sometimes just be in the room and leave the crate door open. Again.. his bed should be his crate. If you do this right the dog will CHOOSE to go into the crate with the door open.

When he will be quiet in the crate with you there, step out of the room for no more than 20 seconds and return. Over the course of days, increase the time you are out of the room and return. Do not leave the dog alone in the house in the crate at this time. Before you leave you can give him a treat. When you return do not immediately release him. He has to settle down first. Sometimes do not release him. Toss a treat when he settles down and stay.. other times leave again. The object is to not let him out if he is upset and to offer no reward or comfort for being upset.

IF you need to go out and you HAVE to leave him in the crate, when you get back IGNORE HIM FOR 15 MINTUTES. Do not let him out of the crate until he at least sits for you (yeah.. even in the mess). do not leave anything in the crate with him other than a Kong or other tough toy stuffed with peanut butter or liver wurst or some other dog delectable stuff.

There are more things you can do to make the crate inviting. Maybe you have. There is a book, "Crate Games" that is sold at www.dopwise.com you ought to get.

At this stage of the game I suspect your dog may have some Separation Anxiety or be developing it. If that you think so too, there is a bood (also from Dogwise) called "I'll Be Home Soon" by Jean Donaldson which may give you some insight into this problem and ways to help your dog handle separation better.

I strongly recommend you do NOT correct your dog at this stage. He may be exhibiting real fear (no matter how irrational we might view this) and to correct at this point may do nothing but escalate the issue.. and that you assuredly want to avoid.
 

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You mean, you let him train you to do what he wants. You rewarded the whining.
considering he whined for 7+ hours, it was time for me to get up and go to work and let him outside. This wasn't a matter of a few minutes. I got no sleep that night.
 

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To the OP - I have a dog who also really hated the crate, and had severe seperation anxiety inside it. My solution was to temporarily forego the use of the crate, and use an alternate location instead, while I re-trained her view of the crate.

I'm fortunate that I have a large, protected outdoor kennel I could use in place of the crate. You could just as easily use a laundry room or similar space.

To give her a new perspective on the crate during this time, I left it out in her view at all times, and worked through Susan Garrett's "Crate Games" DVD with her daily. It helped *tremendously* and I highly recommend it. I guarantee that you and your dog will learn tons from the DVD.

Hope this helps!
 

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You shouldn't have just stuck him in there to begin with IMO. You start slow and calmly and don't let it get to the point where they cry for hours on end.
 
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