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Discussion Starter #22
Yes we do.

We (humans) have flat molars in the back of the mouth. Human jaw has the ability to move both vertically and horizontally to grind. Humans have a long, slow digestive tract to ferment grains.

I'm done on this topic.
 

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All mammals have fermentation as part of their digestive process. Dogs and humans rely more heavily on enzymes for nutrient extraction than fermentation, compared to herbivores (and especially ruminants!) but they do have internal fermentation. An illustration:
Colon bacteria ferment carbohydrates and certain fibers. Both soluble and insoluble fiber in dog food is fermented by colonic bacteria, contributing to flatus. Soybean meal is often used as a protein source in dog food and may contribute to flatulence depending on the amount in the food on a dry matter (DM) basis.

Here is a study looking at digestive fermentation of various grains and vegetables by dogs:
 

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Sorry, I disagree with that assertion.

Yes, the dog will pass the grains as undigested waste.

Dogs do not have the enzymes or gut length to break down and ferment the grains. The teeth and jaw movement do not support "grinding" of grains like omnivores or herbivores.

My dog will occasionally snatch a corn kernel from under a squirrel feeder. I can count on seeing the whole kernel like a bookmark in his excrement about 6-8 hours later. Not digested, only passed.
Well, heck, if you swallowed an intact kernel of dried corn, you'd see it in your excrement, because it it would pass through undigested.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Leo...agreed. But I have the ability to grind it with my teeth.

Although, as a teenager inhaling supper after swim team, bookmarks were common. I was on a see-food diet during my days on swim team.

Drove Mom nuts. I'd come home, make and eat a package of Jello Pudding while supper was being made, then sit down to supper. Leftovers, during swim season were scarce. Then about an hour after supper......where's the ice cream? Dad complained I was a food disposer.
 

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The amount of grass consumed is affecting his excrement.
This could all be a "chicken vs egg" thing.

Dogs often begin consuming grass after digestive upset has occurred. The amount of grass consumed is usually related to the degree of upset.


Some dogs are not good candidates for diet rotations, and deviations. I would pick ONE diet (one brand of quality kibble) and stick with it exclusively, at least for the foreseeable future. No veggie add-ons, toppers, or supplements should be required, as these may also be the source of irregularities.

Most dogs thrive on routine. This applies to diet as well.
 

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Oh. And stop allowing him to sniff dead carcasses, inadvertently or otherwise. That could very well be where all of your dog's troubles began.
 

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I believe BK & LeoRose hit the solution.

Currently, I'm blending 50/50 Carnivora and Acana to feed 3/4 cup/day split into 2 meals. He has stopped eating grass on a consistent basis.

The "filler" that I avoid is the GRAIN fillers.
Just saying that I was responding about "fillers" in regards to your comment:

"My biggest issue with most dry kibble is the fillers used. Anything is likely to be used, but peas, potatos, tapioca starch......etc is common."

Where none of the mentioned fillers are actually a grain.

All dry food needs a carbohydrate to bind it. The percentage of protein and fat is a separate consideration from what carb is the binder. There are high protein and high fat grain inclusive foods and there are lower protein and fat grain-free foods.
 

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I mean, we've known since 2013 that dogs are approximately 5x better at digesting starch than wolves (study: The genomic signature of dog domestication reveals adaptation to a starch-rich diet). That hardly makes them omnivores imo, but it also means that carbohydrate, even grain, in their diet isn't entirely filler. Of course they can't digest much plant matter whole and unaltered - they probably evolved this ability due to eating our (cooked, mashed, ground, predigested, or otherwise processed) garbage and waste in the early days of dog domestication. Kibble, having gone through a lot of processing, would make plant nutrients a lot more available to a dog than just handing them a corn cob to nibble on, you know? That saying, some dogs do better without grain, some do better with, like any ingredient in their diet, really.

But yeah, my dogs are both grazers. And while this can result in 'danglers' on occasion, it doesn't affect the consistency of their poop any. Glad that you're trying a different diet, since I'd guess that's the origin of the sloppy poos and change in behavior before the grass eating itself. Blue Buffalo is pretty much the only commercial dog food my chow hound of a poodle has turned his nose up at, and I've heard lots of stories about it not working for dogs, with soft poops being a frequent issue. Take that as you will.
 

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I mean, we've known since 2013 that dogs are approximately 5x better at digesting starch than wolves (study: The genomic signature of dog domestication reveals adaptation to a starch-rich diet). That hardly makes them omnivores imo, but it also means that carbohydrate, even grain, in their diet isn't entirely filler. Of course they can't digest much plant matter whole and unaltered - they probably evolved this ability due to eating our (cooked, mashed, ground, predigested, or otherwise processed) garbage and waste in the early days of dog domestication.
Exactly this. They can't live off grazing in a wheat field, no. But they can get nutrition from grains that have been processed, which humans have been doing since the dawn of farming, because that processing also allows us to get more nutrients and calories from grains and other plants. Dogs are our coevolutionary partners in many ways.
 

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Could be because she likes grass.
Nothing wrong with it, as long as the grass hasn't been sprayed.
2 of mine are big time grass eaters, another one will eat it sometimes, a 4th rarely eats grass.
 

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I'm with OP on grains.
That being said, dogs who are "suddenly" chowing on grass probably have an upset tummy.
Also, thru the years, I've noticed some dogs required a tweek in diet. Any dog on kibble should be having the kibble soaked in water. Could be you need a brand or protein change. Or even a switch to canned or raw.
Doggie diets around here can change weekly. Still working on figuring out what works best for new pup. I wanted to go raw, so far that doesn't look like an option...even a tiny bit and her guts are unhappy. I don't much like the idea of kibble, but we'll have to see what works.
 
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