Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have an unspayed dog. My reason for not spaying her is that I'm afraid that she might get sick in the future due to the removal of the ovaries. How true is this?

Currently my dog is in season and lots of off-leash dogs in my area have congregated in front of my house. I still walk her but our area has shrunk to the immediate front of the house due to the aforementioned "suitors". I'm also extra cautious so I carry a water bottle and a stick just in case something happens.

I let her sniff / be sniffed by her "suitors". Is this the right thing? My logic is that she will not be that excited by male dogs. Also, I think that getting used to other dogs will be good for her mental health. I have researched that female dogs in heat shouldn't be in contact with males. Please correct / advise me on what I'm doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,435 Posts
You need to look into Pyometra, which is a serious, life-threatening condition that unspayed female dogs can develop. I'd worry more about that than about any issues that could result from being spayed. It's up to you, but personally, I'd spay a female once she had reached adulthood and her growth plates were closed.

That said, you can keep an intact female responsibly, but you MUST keep her away from all intact males while she's in heat. Read up on standing heat and how long heat periods last. Dogs can mate quickly, and male dogs will do anything they can to get to an intact female. You need to be VERY careful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,744 Posts
There's some potential health benefits to allowing a dog to reach physical maturity and go through one or two heat cycles before spaying, assuming you are comfortable safely managing an intact dog. After that, there is very little long-term health risks associated with spaying, and at least two significant benefits (IE it eliminates the risk of pyometra - potentially deadly if not treated quickly enough - and massively reduces the risk of mammary cancer).

Personally, I would not allow the "suitors" access to her. Many in-heat females will be stressed and overwhelmed by constant attention, and there's a high possibility of a fight breaking out. Either because your girl tells the pushy males off, or because multiple males start fighting over her. Later in her heat, once she's done bleeding, she'll be at her most fertile and may well "flag" for the males and try to encourage them to mount - no good! Especially since she's a small dog. A larger male could easily injure her just by trying to mate, even if fights don't happen.

And, of course, having a litter is very hard on the body, especially of a young dog, and has more health risks associated with it than spaying early. Particularly in the case of stray dogs, who may have infections (yes, dogs do have some sexually transmitted diseases!) or be so large that the act of mating could injure her, let alone carrying too-big puppies to term.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,834 Posts
There is a benefit to allowing the dog to become fully grown before spay, but after that point (1 year old, for most dogs) there is no real health benefits. Like others have mentioned, chances of developing Pyometra and mammary cancer are eliminated or greatly reduced by spaying. Many people manage intact females just fine, so that decision is up to you and your own lifestyle.

Personally, if I had an intact female dog in heat and numerous wandering intact male dogs, my dog would not be going on walks. And no, you should not be letting male dogs have ANY contact with her while she's in heat. Normally, sure, but not while she's in heat. She might not seem interested in them now, but she may invite them to mount her later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,194 Posts
I have an intact dog of each gender, so I'm not against keeping females intact by any means. There are pros and cons to keeping intact and spaying, though most of the cons are related to early spay so if the dog is over 1-2 years old they are greatly reduced. Pyometra is a real risk from keeping a bitch intact.

Do not walk her outside and do not let male dogs sniff her. Early in the heat they will be politely interested and not do much, but when she is fertile and in "standing heat" they will be trying to mount her before you can do anything about it, and you might have to physically drag them off of her (and with more than one male around that could be very difficult). It's not worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,377 Posts
Your dog is in heat. DO NOT LET HER SNIFF OR INTERACT WITH MALE DOGS.

When she is in Standing heat (around day 12-15) those male dogs may become extremely aggressive. A water bottle may not deter them. Get a cattle prod.

Keep your dog on leash with a collar the dog cannot absolutely cannot slip. You do NOT want your dog bred.

Typical Heats last 21 days. Two weeks after she is out of heat, have her spayed. With loose dogs around you have a problem.

Heat starts with the dog bleeding from her vulva. Eventually she will stop bleeding or only have a pinkish discharge. That is when you MUST be very vigilant as that is when she would be receptive to males and allow them to breed her. After this she will bleed again (usually for 3-4 days) and that will be the end of her heat cycle.

I have two spayed females (spayed after having heats) and they are both fine and healthy. Neither was spayed before age 3 but I was waiting to train and title them etc. to see if they were worthy of being bred. By 3 I knew they were not going to be bred and I spayed them. These were both very well bred German Shepherd dogs. BTW where I live there were no loose dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,391 Posts
First, ask your Vet for her opinion of when to spay a female, and raise your concerns. Second, when your female is in heat, she is very receptive and is interested in mating with as many males as possible, so as other folks recommend, don't let her sniff, be sniffed, or come in contact with other dogs.

It is your choice whether you want to spay your dog or not. But, discuss it with your Vet so that you have the current facts.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top