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My eight year old poodle stiffened up at night and the next morning. I rushed her to the vet, who took her temperature and felt her stomach, looked at her eyes and said I can't find anything wrong with her. How about we give her a full blood workup. I agreed since it had never been done before. I waited for the test to be complete and she printed out the results and showed me that her liver was not good and told me that she had hepatitis and gave me some pills to give her morning and night and to return in thirty days. My dog is feeling fine now and seems OK, but she does sleep a lot. I looked up hepatitus in dogs and yes, there is such an illness in dogs. It said to not give dogs cheese, but the only way I can get her to take her pill is in cream cheese. She won't take peanut butter and won't let me open her mouth. So, I'm confused as to what to do and to expect with a dog that has hepatitis. The website said about 30% of dogs die. I'm so worried. Has anyone else had a dog with hepatitis?
 

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Hmmm......if the dog won't take voluntarily, then you'll need to be more tricky or assertive.

Tricky is when doing training with treats, get in a rapid fire reward sequence and slip the pill in the sequence. Be aware the dog may sense the pill is not a treat and reject it.......the training session will likely be finished at that point.

Assertive is actually being forceful. Tilt the dog's head back to a chin high position, open the mouth, place the pill deep in the throat on the back of the tongue, close and hold the mouth closed, stroke the throat. The head must be held chin high. Follow with a high value treat. Poodles are smart and will quickly adapt an escape method to avoid this technique.

Another approach would be to open the capsule and sprinkle the contents on the dog's food. Check with the Vet first. Some drugs are meant to have a slow release. This method is not a slow release into the dog's system.

Good Luck and hope recovery goes well.
 

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Hmmm......if the dog won't take voluntarily, then you'll need to be more tricky or assertive.

Tricky is when doing training with treats, get in a rapid fire reward sequence and slip the pill in the sequence. Be aware the dog may sense the pill is not a treat and reject it.......the training session will likely be finished at that point.

Assertive is actually being forceful. Tilt the dog's head back to a chin high position, open the mouth, place the pill deep in the throat on the back of the tongue, close and hold the mouth closed, stroke the throat. The head must be held chin high. Follow with a high value treat. Poodles are smart and will quickly adapt an escape method to avoid this technique.

Another approach would be to open the capsule and sprinkle the contents on the dog's food. Check with the Vet first. Some drugs are meant to have a slow release. This method is not a slow release into the dog's system.

Good Luck and hope recovery goes well.
Thanks but it's a very hard tablet that cannot be cut or crushed. My dog will NOT allow me to get her mouth open. But, I am very concerned about her having Hepatitis and am hoping for some information from other members here if anyone else had this problem with their dog.
 

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Ok.....two options.

Force the dog's mouth open. This is best with 2 people. One to hold the dog, the other to manipulate the head. Using the Assertive approach that I suggested you will need to use your hands to open the mouth. Use one had to locate where the lower jaw hinges to the skull. Squeeze the hinge on both sides of the skull. Simultaneously, use your other hand to separate the jaw at the incisor teeth between the canines. You don't need to be a Gorilla, just firm pressure on the jaw hinge and between the upper/lower incisors.

The other option is to ask the Vet for an alternate form of the medication. Possibly a liquid that your could administer with a needleless syringe in the back of the throat or that could be mixed with the food.

If the Vet has no alternates and the dog resists.....you need to find a method to crush the tablet. Soak it in water to soften, cut with knife, crush in a vice, pair of pliers.....something and try mixing the powder into the food. Trust me, the tablet can be broken, otherwise the dog would pass the tablet whole.

You need to get the meds into the dog. Otherwise, the dog will descend into the 30% bracket.
 

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Ok.....two options.

Force the dog's mouth open. This is best with 2 people. One to hold the dog, the other to manipulate the head. Using the Assertive approach that I suggested you will need to use your hands to open the mouth. Use one had to locate where the lower jaw hinges to the skull. Squeeze the hinge on both sides of the skull. Simultaneously, use your other hand to separate the jaw at the incisor teeth between the canines. You don't need to be a Gorilla, just firm pressure on the jaw hinge and between the upper/lower incisors.

The other option is to ask the Vet for an alternate form of the medication. Possibly a liquid that your could administer with a needleless syringe in the back of the throat or that could be mixed with the food.

You need to get the meds into the dog. Otherwise, the dog will descend into the 30% bracket.
Yes, I know about the 30%, but she still won't allow me to open her mouth and there is only me to do it. Thanks for your input. I still am hoping someone on the Forum has had a dog with the same healthl problem and can advise me.
 

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My other thought is to crush the tablet into a fine powder, mix with water, administer with a needleless syringe in the back of the throat.

Seems like you should contact your Vet for an alternate form of the medication.


Good luck.
 

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Have you tried other foods besides cream cheese? My dogs are crazy for bananas and eggs (not necessarily in combination, lol) both of which would be pretty easy to hide a pill in. There's also a commercial product called "pill pockets" that might work.
 

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I was going to recommend pill pockets, as well. If a dog isn't already used to having their mouth handled, and the owner isn't used to handling the dog's mouth, forcing pills should be a last resort.

Another alternative is, once she is feeling better, is to teach her to take pills on her own.
 
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