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My fiancé and I adopted a two year old poodle. He has been great other than house training. When we're in the house during waking hours, he usually stays in the room with one of us. If he has to go out, he'll wait by the door and cry.

When we first got him and tried to leave him alone (when we left for work, for example), we would always come home to an accident on the floor. Since then, we have been crating him with a toys while we're away.

Well, at night, we let him sleep with us in bed. He's been fine for a few months but in the last couple of weeks (nothing has changed AFAIK), we wake up to poop and pee in the house. He used to do it in one particular room so we closed the door and now he is doing it in the living room. What's really strange is he does it all over. It's like he is walking around while relieving himself.

We were told to keep him in his crate at night. We tried this for a few days but he wouldn't stop whining the whole night (it was impossible to get to sleep!). We also would prefer to not crate him (both of us grew up with dogs that weren't crated).

We don't know what to do. He is walked right before we go to bed. Last night, for instance, we walked him @11:30 and he did everything but we woke up at 8:00 to more stuff on the floor.

The other thing is, he doesn't try to wake us up, unless he is crying too quietly.

Any ideas on what we can do?

Thanks in advance,
Chad
 

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You have two options. You can watch him 24/7 (that means day and night) or you can crate him when you're not able to do that.

People have house-trained dogs without crate training. I personally would never try it.
 

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You have two options. You can watch him 24/7 (that means day and night) or you can crate him when you're not able to do that.

People have house-trained dogs without crate training. I personally would never try it.
So, if you crate him at night, at what point do you start to trust him and leave him out of his crate at night?
 

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When he doesn't pee and poop all over the house.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
But he doesn't go in the house if we're awake and at home. Therefore, to know, we would have to test him by letting him stay out of his crate for a night/day. Is this what you're suggesting?

I guess I can't understand how keeping a dog in a cate will train them not to go while they're not in a crate. The logic doesn't add up to me.
 

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I'd also make sure you've properly cleaned up all the messes he's made - the smell may still be lingering which is reinforcing the behaviour.

How long have you had him?
 

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We've had him for about 3 months. We've been using something called Capture along with a UV light and are doing our best to clean it up.
 

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I don't think Capture is an enzymatic cleaner which is what you need to clean up pet messes. Look for something like Nature's Miracle to remove all the smells that only your dog will notice and will signal him to mark the spot again.

If you don't want to crate him why not just close the bedroom door? If he is walking around in your bedroom at least you might wake up and be able to catch him in the act so you can correct the behavior.
 

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I guess I can't understand how keeping a dog in a cate will train them not to go while they're not in a crate. The logic doesn't add up to me.
OK, it's pretty simple if you recognize that a dog who is going in the house at any time of day ever (day or night) is a dog that doesn't understand that the floor is not an acceptable/appropriate place to go to the bathroom. In other words, if the dog ever goes to the bathroom inside, he's not housebroken. As Loki alluded, every time he goes in the house it reinforces the behavior. Just like with a puppy, if you don't give the dog the opportunity to have accidents, he will eventually come to realize that outdoors is the only acceptable bathroom. That is why crate training is so effective with housebreaking -- it prevents errors. That's how you housebreak a puppy, and it's the same with an adult dog -- just quicker with an adult dog, because they have bladder control.

You're getting good advice here. What you need to do is go back to housetraining 101 a little bit.

As far as crating goes: I don't personally understand the opposition to crating, but whatever. It's a temporary thing if you want it to be. Eventually, you will have to test it, but I would really go back to basics/crating or supervision for at least a month or two first, until you really trust your dog not to leave messes.

Is the crate in your bedroom? If not, I would try that. Also, have you tried closing your bedroom doors so he can't get out of the bedroom while you sleep? That worked really well for us -- we still crate Biscuit during the day (mostly to keep her safe, not due to housetraining issues, and she is younger than your dog) but she's been in the bedroom with us, with the doors closed, since well before she was really trustworthy in the house, and she never had an accident in the bedroom. I think dogs are reluctant to potty where they sleep.
 

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Our Ginny sometimes does the same thing at night. She also sits at the door and gives soft whines when she wants out. I think at night, that we do not hear her whining at the door. So, she stays in our bedroom. now..with the door closed and she is totally fine. That way, I do hear her whine if she needs out. In the summer we will just put a gate across the bedroom door so we do not have to close the door. We do not have a/c so it would be too hot.
 

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If he's been "fine" for a few months (to me, fine means he WASN'T having accidents at night), and has only had this problem the last couple of weeks, you might want to take him to the vet. Changes in behaviors can sometimes have a physical reason.

If not, crate him at night. We crated our dogs at night when they were new puppies. When they were potty trained they got to sleep with us. Dogs generally don't like to pee/poop where they sleep. That is why crating can PREVENT accidents. A dog may work harder to hold it so they don't have to pee/poop in an area and then sleep in that area.

That is a general statement, and doesn't apply to all dogs, but that is one reason some people use crates as tools for potty training.
 

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But he doesn't go in the house if we're awake and at home. Therefore, to know, we would have to test him by letting him stay out of his crate for a night/day. Is this what you're suggesting?

I guess I can't understand how keeping a dog in a cate will train them not to go while they're not in a crate. The logic doesn't add up to me.
The key is making your dog understand that every part of your home ...is also their home.
 

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But he doesn't go in the house if we're awake and at home. Therefore, to know, we would have to test him by letting him stay out of his crate for a night/day. Is this what you're suggesting?

I guess I can't understand how keeping a dog in a cate will train them not to go while they're not in a crate. The logic doesn't add up to me.
Because every time your dog is able to to go inside, it's reinforcing the idea that going in the house is ok. It's immediately reinforcing in itself. the fewer mistakes he has in the house, the faster he will be housebroken.
 

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There are products available that help you train your pet to go toilet. Instinctively pets are territorial so if they smell a scent of another dog's pee they will be inclined to mark over the top of it.

Pet Loo developed "skip to my loo" which is a unique attractant that helps you to toilet train your best friend. You can find it at www.thepetloo.com.

The scent has been designed to attract and encourage your dog, or puppy to relieve itself in an area designated by you. It makes a perfect companion for The Pet Loo and can be used indoors or out.

So we're clear, Skip to my Loo is not a smelly extract of animal feces; instead it is a scientifically formulated solution that mimics animal urine which attract your puppy, it is easy to use and easy to apply.

Its important to note that constant praise and reward for doing the right thing will also ensure he / she does the right thing over and over again… they simply just want to please you!!
 

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There are products available that help you train your pet to go toilet. Instinctively pets are territorial so if they smell a scent of another dog's pee they will be inclined to mark over the top of it.

Pet Loo developed "skip to my loo" which is a unique attractant that helps you to toilet train your best friend. You can find it at www.thepetloo.com.

The scent has been designed to attract and encourage your dog, or puppy to relieve itself in an area designated by you. It makes a perfect companion for The Pet Loo and can be used indoors or out.

So we're clear, Skip to my Loo is not a smelly extract of animal feces; instead it is a scientifically formulated solution that mimics animal urine which attract your puppy, it is easy to use and easy to apply.

Its important to note that constant praise and reward for doing the right thing will also ensure he / she does the right thing over and over again… they simply just want to please you!!
The Pet Loo has nothing to do with the right solution to this issue.
 
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