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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello. I have posted on this website when I first bought my dog. He is now 1 year old male pug and... the devil dog... but only with me. I have been doing obedience training such as;

-sitting at doors and me entering first
-me eating first, and then making him sit for me to feed him
-not allowed on the furniture
-pinning him til he relaxes
etc. etc. etc.

But none of this seems to be getting through to him and I am honestly losing my mind. I have had trainers come - and hes amazing when they leave, but when I continuously try for weeks on end - he will do absolutely nothing for me but bite my pants/feet.

The main thing is how do I get this dog to stop!! The main things I want to focuse on right now is

1. What is a better way to get him to stop jumping on the bed?
2.Jumping on my face when i am laying down?
3. Chewing shoes
4. Biting me (Ive tried almost every method -the OUCH!, the thumb in his mouth, pinning him down etc.
5. Stop chewing absolutely everything he possible can
6. Get him to listen when I say NO such as going into a room/spot in the room etc.
7.BITING MY PANTS AND ANKLES AND FEET


This one year dog knows when he is bad. He corwards or hides. He is also potty trained but sometimes decides it would be better to go in the house.

Please provide me with suggestions - and I'll let you know if I've tried.

AND THESE ARENT THE THINGS THAT MAKE HIM THE DEVIL DOG. JUST A FEW THINGS I WANT TO *START* WORKING ON PRIOR TO THE BAD STUFF

 

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wow sounds like my dog. Mine starts her training on the 24th and I hope this helps her! Is he always playing when he does this? not mean? I asked the vet today if they do grow out of it [when it's playing and not aggressive] and he said they do just keep up being the boss..... this made me feel better until I read your post!:D:eek:
 

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This one year dog knows when he is bad. He corwards or hides. He is also potty trained but sometimes decides it would be better to go in the house.
This does not mean what you think it means. He is almost certainly fearful and confused. This is usually the result of the owner not consistently taking control of the dog, and then lashing out when the dog's behavior gets too extreme. This is why the dog is an angel for the trainer--he knows what is expected of him. Without having met you or your dog, I'll make book on that being the case.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah, I agree. My biggest mistake was 60% of the time "it was cute" when he was a puppy - I'm paying for it now. But i'm consistently "being the boss" now and still no improvement... maybe 2%....

any suggestions on how to be the boss more?
 

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It sounds like your training is a list of what he's not supposed to do. As you've said, that isn't working. Instead, teach him what is IS supposed to do.

1. What is a better way to get him to stop jumping on the bed?
Keep him in another room or crate him when he's in your room.

2.Jumping on my face when i am laying down?
Leave the room and give him no attention. Don't yell or rebuke him--just remove what he wants most: you.

3. Chewing shoes
Replace the shoe with a toy or something he can chew.

4. Biting me (Ive tried almost every method -the OUCH!, the thumb in his mouth, pinning him down etc.
Putting a thumb in his mouth or pinning him down is only going to make it worse. Walk away and ignore him after he bites.

5. Stop chewing absolutely everything he possible can
See #3.

6. Get him to listen when I say NO such as going into a room/spot in the room etc.
Teach him what you want him to do instead. Don't just say no, direct him to what you want him to do, such as go to a crate or a specific place.

7.BITING MY PANTS AND ANKLES AND FEET
This sounds like a play for attention. How much do you play with him? How much exercise does he get? If you play with him often, you might see this diminish. Or give him no attention for it, so he learns that doing it doesn't benefit him.

This one year dog knows when he is bad.
No, he doesn't. He knows that you get upset with him, but he doesn't know what you want him to do.

He corwards or hides. He is also potty trained but sometimes decides it would be better to go in the house.
A dog that is afraid enough to cower, hide, and pee submissively is not going to respond to repeated NO NO NO. Use positive reinforcement training and teach him what behaviors you like. Praise him when he does them.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks - that is great advice! I will continue to try.

however the whole ignoring part, or walking away is hard as he continues to bit me the whole entire time and I have to close the door behind my to get him to stop - and then he chews the room apart? and crate... well he has hated his crate ever since a puppy.

I say "bedtime" and he goes to his crate but lately - he wont do anything unless its my boyfriend saying it - who works evenings so he is never aorund with I am with Buddy.

how do i get Buddy to realize IM the dominant one
 

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Thanks - that is great advice! I will continue to try.

however the whole ignoring part, or walking away is hard as he continues to bit me the whole entire time and I have to close the door behind my to get him to stop - and then he chews the room apart? and crate... well he has hated his crate ever since a puppy.

I say "bedtime" and he goes to his crate but lately - he wont do anything unless its my boyfriend saying it - who works evenings so he is never aorund with I am with Buddy.

how do i get Buddy to realize IM the dominant one
It's not about being dominant, it's about being a leader/teacher. Close the door behind you and ignore him for a few minutes. It's not an over night cure, but with consistency he'll start to understand that he gets ignored when he behaves that way. As far as chewing the room apart - pick up and keep things out of his reach.
 

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I don't think dominance is the problem. It sounds like he's afraid, and when a dog is afraid, asserting dominance can make things worse. Yes, you need to be a leader. Lead with kindness and direction about what he should do.

Sounds like some crate training might be in order. Coax him in with treats so he enjoys being in there. I believe there's a sticky post about crate training. The sticky posts here are really helpful. I believe there is one about biting as well. Check them out and see what they suggest.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
yeah he does get treats to go in the cage, every since he was a puppy - but he freaks right out the second you close the door - and if you dont close it - theres no way in hell he'll stay in there
 

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Quit worrying about being dominant and start working on being a benevolant leader. Your dog is not trying to rule your home, he doesn't understand what is expected of him. You also need to STOP pinning your dog! Alpha rolling does nothing to establish you as a leader, all it does is show your dog that you are scary and unpredictable. Check out the NILIF sticky and start practicing it. Use positive reinforcement to SHOW your dog what you want him to do. Have you ever owned a Pug before? They are definitley a challenge to own, but are really not that difficult to train if you are using positive reinforcement. They respond horribly to harsh physical methods. When your dog bites, yelp like a puppy, and immediately get up and leave the room. Just yelling ouch or yelping isn't enough, you have to remove yourself. You will have to puppy proof the room so that he can't destroy anything while he is alone. You will only have to leave him alone for a minute or two anyway. Most of these behaviors are attention seeking behavior. Make sure you are spending ample time playing and excersisng your dog. Pugs are far more high energy than most people think and need quite a bit of excersise. Good luck, just remember you will need a great deal of patience and consistancy to make this work.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I do thank everyone for their wonderful advice.

As for the dominant thing and pinning thing, i was advised to do so by a vet and 2 trainers - in my defence, I was clearly misinformed cause it clearly isnt working!!

lol thank you everyone
 

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A dog who cowers, or blinks and scoots away when you reach your hand out, is obviously uncertain about why he is being manhandled. Philosophically, I'm cool with the concept of using appropriate force on a dog, but until you have a better ability to communicate with your dog (communication goes both ways) you are really in no position to use any physical correction or control on the pooch.

Being "in charge" does not require frightening a dog. It is more about exuding the attitude that you have the moral right to be the boss. Before you can do that, you have to believe it. Insist that the dog do something for you, before you do something for him. Every single time. Non-force training methods work well and should probably go that way.
 

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however the whole ignoring part, or walking away is hard as he continues to bit me the whole entire time and I have to close the door behind my to get him to stop - and then he chews the room apart?
Ignoring is hard - but giving him attention is just reinforcing the behavior. You're giving him what he wants, so of course he'll keep doing it. Closing the door gives him free run of the room, so that's not working. He just gets a different reward (chewing on other stuff instead of your pants)

Does he know any cues? Have him sit when he starts doing that. When he does, then give him some playtime and attention.

Link what he wants to performing as you wish. Sit for food. Sit for play. Sit to go on a walk, etc. That will do more to set yourself up as his leader/boss/provider of all good things than any corrections (especially since he doesn't seem to be regarding those corrections based on your post).

I say "bedtime" and he goes to his crate but lately - he wont do anything unless its my boyfriend saying it - who works evenings so he is never aorund with I am with Buddy.
If he knows the cue, then he knows the behavior. He may be trying to see just how serious you are. Wally did this. What I would do would be to gently, but firmly put him in the crate if he doesn't go on cue. You won't hurt him, but you won't just let him stay put and ignore the direction. Then give him a reward for "doing" what you said if he stays in the crate. Yeah, you put him in there, but he is staying in there - so reward the position (staying in the crate).


how do i get Buddy to realize IM the dominant one
You have to show him what you expect and then require it from him. Any behavior he knows, require it before you give him anything he might want or find fun. It can be simply sitting, or just standing and giving eye contact. Lure/entice the eye contact if you have to if he's not used to doing so on cue.

Dominance is resource control, i.e. access to all the stuff he wants. You have all the resources he wants (attention, food, access to outside, play time, toys, access to the house, etc) - you just have to change how he gains access. You have to be a stronger lock and have his behaviors be the key to open you up and get the rewards he wants.

yeah he does get treats to go in the cage, every since he was a puppy - but he freaks right out the second you close the door - and if you dont close it - theres no way in hell he'll stay in there
Do you open the gate when he freaks out?

Then of course, he's gonna throw a fit to get out of "jail" :)

Once he's reliably giving you some quiet (even just a few seconds) then you can start asking for longer times. Try 5 seconds. Then 15. Then 30, etc. If at any point he fails - back up to the last time he gave you (say he did 10 seconds, but couldn't do 20 - back up to 10 seconds), and keep working at that level longer, and try again at the longer time.

Also, associate the crate with good things. Feed his meals in there, for example.
 

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You have received really good advice here!

I have a pug, and when she was a puppy I thought I was going to lose my mind. Like Kuma's Mom said, they are WAY more high energy than people think. They need regular walks and training just like any other dog.

What works best in the training department is food! Pugs are extremely food driven. Work on his sit & stays, the "leave it" command and go from there. Boil some chicken breast and he will think he is in heaven and may do just about whatever you ask. It will take time, and a lot of patience!

My Chloe is 17 months now and is SO well behaved. It's only because I take extra time each day to work on her manners, and she has calmed down a ton!

Good luck to you & Buddy!
 

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From what you have mentioned of your training techniques, you most likely have a very confused dog. As others have said, "dominance" is thrown around like "aggression" and is a loaded word - and more often than not, is used miscorrectly. A lot of previous thoughts on dog behavior and training (such as walking through doorways first and eating before your dog, not to mention alpha rolling) have been shown by modern studies as either ineffective, or not solving the problems they were originally intended to solve.

I would pick up an up to date training book (An Idiot's Guide to Positive Dog Training, The Other End of the Leash, Don't Shoot the Dog, and Good Dogs, Great Owners are some books I would reccomend) and learn about the new training options that are being introduced to the world of dogs.

Chloe was a terror dog as a puppy, and I will tell you what worked for me with her. This may or may not help you with your pug - depends on your relationship with him and his personality.

1. What is a better way to get him to stop jumping on the bed?
Chloe knows that it is a death scentence to jump on my bed. LOL If she tried, I'd give her the boot and tell her "off" (which she already knew ment "get paws off of object asap"). The only time she is in my room is when I am in my bed, so it wasn't too hard to reinforce the "stay off of the bed". I'm sure she'd jump on it if she had free access to it, but she doesn't.
So, in short, teach him a realible off command and reinforce it by never letting him on the bed when you are in the room. When you are not in the room to reinforce the command, prevent him from having access to the bed.

2.Jumping on my face when i am laying down?
Laying on your bed, or on the floor? If you are on the floor...good luck. LOL My dogs think that people laying on the floor equals play time! If on your bed, don't let him jump on the bed. If on the floor, teach him to fetch a toy and then play tug with him instead of having him burn off his energy by pouncing on your face.

3. Chewing shoes
Keep shoes picked up. If he happens to get a shoe, swap with an appropriate toy and praise him. Our Lab had a flip flop fetish and would chew them to peices. We never could get her to stop chewing on them, but we did learn very quickly to keep them picked up.

4. Biting me (Ive tried almost every method -the OUCH!, the thumb in his mouth, pinning him down etc.
What worked with both Chloe and Sadie was to teach them to retrieve a toy. If they tried to nip at me, I shoved a toy in their mouth and said, "Get your toy!" We would then play with the toy. Eventually, I was able to say, "Get your toy!" and they would grab the toy on their own. Now, if Chloe starts getting excited (and in turn, nippy), she will automatically run and grab a toy.

5. Stop chewing absolutely everything he possible can
I have four words of advice: exercise, a clean house, supervision and bitter apple spray.

A tired dog is a good dog, and a dog that is sleeping cannot chew on your table! Exercise him. Take him for long walks, play lots of fetch, and exercise his mind by providing him interactive toys such as buster cubes and kongs.

Keep things picked up. For the things that cannot be picked up (your furniture), spray them with bitter apple spray. Makes things taste yucky. And supervise him! If you notice him chewing on an object he shouldn't be, clap your hands to startle him out of chewing, then redirect him to an appropriate item to chew.

6. Get him to listen when I say NO such as going into a room/spot in the room etc.
Not quite sure what you mean by this one. Dogs don't know what "no" means. It is better to interupt the behavior you don't want, and then show him what you do want. My dogs respond to "no" like a "leave it" command. But I had to teach them that.

7.BITING MY PANTS AND ANKLES AND FEET
See number 4 and 5.
 

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Do yourself a favor and tune Cesar Millan out of your mind. Because the "obedience" you describe doing is actually some botched program that man put together to make an entertaining TV show.

If you don't want him on the bed, you can either put a gate up or limit his access to the bedroom. Right now he doesn't seem like he wants to listen to you, probably because he's massively confused, so I doubt he'll give a crap if you enforce an "off" command. Take him out of the bedroom environment for a while and eventually start over.

If you don't want him chewing, you need to keep him away from whatever he's getting at. Buy a crate and keep him confined while you're not home. If he's housebroken, you can buy a little bit of a larger crate to give him some room to move around.

Honestly, he is an adolescent dog and now sounds a bit unsure of himself overall. I might suggest hiring a behaviorist or trainer to help you out.
 

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You have received good advice.

I will add.. on the crate thing.. NEVER let him OUT of the crate when he is "having a fit." If you do he has successfully trianed you to let himout if he has a fit.

There is a good book you can get called "Crate Games" (www.dogwise.com)

Training is not like going to school where yu have to do things because you are told and must, 'or else.' Training a dog should be more like playing a game.
 

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how do i get Buddy to realize IM the dominant one
You've gotten some great advice so far, but I wanted to comment on this one statement. As others have said, it's not about being dominant. And you can't force dominance anyway. A true "pack leader" is more of a benevolent dicator that rules at the will of the pack. In other words, you can't force a dog to respect and trust you. You can force a dog to physically submit - which will also often cause a dog to distrust and fear you. But for them to mentally submit (meaning: to willfully follow you/listen to you) isn't about pinning them or forcing them or dominating them. And to have a true harmonious relationship with a dog, the respect must be mutual and the trust must be earned (meaning, YOU must earn the trust from the dog). You don't automatically get the trust and respect because you happen to walk upright.

Also realize that the dog is only a year old. In many ways, he's still very much a juvenile or a puppy. His size may not be small anymore, but he's still very immature. Don't expect perfection from him. Expect that he will make mistakes...and he may challenge you...but remain positive.

I would really recommend reading the book "The Other End of the Leash" by Patricia McConnell and registering to read some of Suzanne Clothier's free articles on her site: http://flyingdogpress.com/. You have a lot to learn about being an owner that's worthy of your dog's devotion, respect and trust. Work on being fair and consistent. Move away from correction and start using positive reinforcement for behavior you want and ignore behavior you don't want, in the hopes of extinguishing it. I just think that corrections at this point are only going to do more damage to the relationship.

We can give you pointers and ideas to correct behavior A or behavior B, but I really think that all these issues are a symptom of a bigger problem - you aren't someone your dog thinks he should listen to and when you try to force your will on him, he's just resisting and you're giving him more reason why he doesn't want to follow you.

I do think some of Cesar's principles would work, but it sounds like you are applying the wrong ones in the wrong ways (if you are watching his show). At this point, if you are watching him/reading him, I would stop because what you are doing isn't working. Being pack leader is so much more than going through a door way first or making him sit before eating. Those are only small bits of a much bigger picture.
 

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There is a good book you can get called "Crate Games" (www.dogwise.com)

Training is not like going to school where yu have to do things because you are told and must, 'or else.' Training a dog should be more like playing a game.
I will have to look at the book myself. Wally doesn't have a problem going in the crate, but teaching him more games might help him develop a desire to be more playful.

Heck, even in school kids (and probably adults) often remember what they learned while playing a game (or doing a fun project) more than just sitting there getting lectured or doing boring workbook pages.
 

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4. Biting me (Ive tried almost every method -the OUCH!, the thumb in his mouth, pinning him down etc.

My roomie had this problem with her pug as well, and same for her the things you mentioned didnt work. What she ended up doing was filling a can or bottle with beads or coffee beans or something like that. Whenever Roxy bit her she would shake the can infront of her really hard to make alot of noise and Roxy would let go. It might not work for everyone but it certainly worked for her.
 
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