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My dog is a little over a year old. He is a white boxer/pit bull. He loves to play, however if I let him outside without a leash he runs away and thinks it's a game when I try to catch him. He's very quick so no matter how fast I go he is always faster! I cannot figure out how to keep him in the yard or for him to come when I call him!! :( I'm worried he's going to get hit on the road sometime. Help please!
 

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Teach him a recall...get like a 6 foot long leash and call his name (or give it a command like "come" or "here") and if he comes back give him a treat and praise....and then get longer and longer leashes until he comes back and then try it off leash. But don't always use it to end play time because they will catch on to that and then they won't want to come back at all. So call him in when he's playing and if he comes then release him again to play and then after a few minutes call him back in to end it. Just keep him guessing....this is going to take a long time and it'll never be 100% reliable but it'll be like 99% anyway teach him this and work with him on it.
 

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If you don't have a fenced in yard, you should take him out on a leash or use a tie-out.

Teaching recall is the best option and it's better to do it sooner rather than later. And keep in mind it is a long process (coming inside is much easier than outside, etc).

Also, the best thing to do if your dog gets loose is to call his name and run away while squeaking a toy or making fun noises. Chances are he'll run to chase after you, especially if he enjoys playing chase already (which it sounds like he does). Don't be afraid to act strange. I've made strange noises, jumping up and down and spinning in circles in my pajamas outside to get my dog to come to me when my fence wasn't latched properly. You're dog's safety is much more important than your ego or convenience.
 

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If you don't have a fenced in yard, you should take him out on a leash or use a tie-out.

Teaching recall is the best option and it's better to do it sooner rather than later. And keep in mind it is a long process (coming inside is much easier than outside, etc).

Also, the best thing to do if your dog gets loose is to call his name and run away while squeaking a toy or making fun noises. Chances are he'll run to chase after you, especially if he enjoys playing chase already (which it sounds like he does). Don't be afraid to act strange. I've made strange noises, jumping up and down and spinning in circles in my pajamas outside to get my dog to come to me when my fence wasn't latched properly. You're dog's safety is much more important than your ego or convenience.
OMG yes...dogs love it when you make funny noises and running away calling their name and making a fool of yourself :D
 

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My dog is a little over a year old. He is a white boxer/pit bull. He loves to play, however if I let him outside without a leash he runs away and thinks it's a game when I try to catch him. He's very quick so no matter how fast I go he is always faster! I cannot figure out how to keep him in the yard or for him to come when I call him!! :( I'm worried he's going to get hit on the road sometime. Help please!
Is he deaf? White Boxers have a very high chance of being deaf. If there is NO pigment around his ears, that is a good indication he could have hearing problems. Now, if he hears just fine, the rest of it is a training issue.

First, my opinion is that Pit mixes (any dog that looks strongly like a pit bull or bully breed) should not be off leash outside of a fenced area or, once very very well trained, in a quiet area like a private farm or wilderness area with a minimal chance of running into any unknown dogs or humans. Unfortunately, no matter how sweet and friendly the dog is, if anything goes wrong, the "pit bull" will be blamed. People who wouldn't mind a Lab or collie running up to them sometimes panic seeing a big blockheaded dog running at them. If there is a dog fight, the loose pit bull will be the one at fault. Heck, I've seen a judge rule against a leashed pit that was attacked by another off-leash dog (later overturned by a higher court).

All that said-- get a long line. A horse lunge line from a farm store (like Tractor Supply Company) works very well. Then always take him outside on that line and after he does his business, practice recall. Use yummy treats. Call him, reward him, (reel him in on the long line if needed), let him back to the extent of the long line and repeat. Gradually add distractions by practicing this in busier areas like near a public park.

Don't call your dog to you to go inside every time (as in, the fun shouldn't always end when he comes to you) Sometimes just call him to you and reward him and then let him go play again.

He shouldn't be off leash outside of a fenced area until (if ever) his recall is 100%. Including when there are squirrels, rabbits, cat, people, dogs and cars within sight.

Don't play chase games where you chase him. He can chase you, that's a good game to teach him to follow you. But you don't want to encourage him to think that you chasing him is fun/time to play.
 

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I use a 30 foot tracking line to teach recalls and for when we're just playing in the yard. It's VERY important that if every single time the dog comes to you, even if you are angry that they ran off, you praise and reward the heck out of them. Coming to you needs to become the BEST THING EVER!! It's also important not to use your come command, whatever it is, whenever you need to do anything unpleasant to the dog, like baths or nail trimming or anything the dog doesn't like. For those things, just go get the dog. If you have used the command for those things, just pick a new one. I'd also try to make sure that calling the dog doesn't always mean the end of the fun. I would call the dog in the middle of playing, several times, and always reward like crazy, making it a game and so the dog is never sure which call is going to mean the play is over.
 

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Simple - Don't let him outside off leash.

Then work on recall. You can get a long line (20-50ft) so he can have some freedom, but you still have control. Then work on recall. Make coming to you the best and most exciting thing ever. Have him come to you, hold his collar while you reward with delicious treats, then let him go again to play. If he doesn't come, immediately take off running in the opposite direction and he will probably chase you, at which point you can reward him for coming. If he really won't come no matter what, use the long line to reel him in.

Once his recall is improved, you may be able to drop the lead. A dog dragging a 20ft lead is much easier to catch when he decides to play the "you can't catch me" game.

Work on all of this now, and he'll be great as an adult. He's at the prime age for being an adolescent and ignoring you, so manage his behavior so he doesn't get a chance to blow you off when you call.
 

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I use the word come with my dog so much that she kind of ignores it. I am training her with the word here instead. That's OK, right? I am working under the assumption that it really doesn't matter what word you use. Here is now the word I use to mean "Drop everything you are doing and get here right now!"
 

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I use the word come with my dog so much that she kind of ignores it. I am training her with the word here instead. That's OK, right? I am working under the assumption that it really doesn't matter what word you use. Here is now the word I use to mean "Drop everything you are doing and get here right now!"
Absolutely fine, heck, you could use "Wumma wumma" if you wanted, so long as you teach the dog what you mean lol.

Something else you might want to consider is also training, or keeping in mind the "emergency recall". Caeda LOVES playing with the laser dot, so for ages her emergency recall was "where's the dot" and she would instantly come to me looking for it. Now she seems to understand my tone of voice whether I intend "World is ending and you have to be here NOW" vs, "finish sniffing that blade of grass and get over here when you get the chance". If you do an emergency recall word, don't abuse it, and ALWAYS treat for it, no matter what, every time, even if your mad because the dog was chasing the cat or whatever caused the emergency.
 
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