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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Tibetan Terrier is a year old and, while I wouldn't say recall is perfect, she has always come back to me eventually. In the past week or so she's developed an aversion to being put on her lead when out on walks (she's fine doing it in my flat?). I have no idea why! I wonder if I hurt her putting it on once? I don't know what to do. I think I'm making it worse by making it a big issue, handling it the wrong way and not being consistent (e.g. luring her with treats rather than just rewarding when she actually comes, grabbing at her, tricking her, telling her off, trying loads of different commands...). To give an idea of the situation, she wants to be with me when out. She will come away from playing with other dogs, stay near to me and, when called, will come (frustratingly!) close etc., but at the end of the walk (or during as practice) getting her back on the lead is a nightmare. Today I had to enlist other dog walkers to help me. I think she's 'spooked' rather than just being stubborn or wanting me to play chase. HELLLPPPP!!!!
 

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You are making it worse by making it an issue. I would not take her off leash. Let her drag it. I would not go to a dog park and let her play with other dogs either.

Most dogs develop an aversion to leashes because the leash means loss of freedom or it means end of play time. Your dog is playing the age old keep away game.

Keep it positive. Put the leash on feed treats. Take it off. Feed treats. Make it a positive non-event. Do this repeatedly at home. Last time? Just take it off, feed and then go on about what you are doing at home (IOW's make it so the leash going on does not mean you are doing something else like going for a walk or taking the fun out of things for her).

When you are out where you would normally take the leash off have two leashes. Take one off and let her drag the other leash. Again do the leash on; feed then leash off; feed routine. Since she is dragging the second leash you still have control (you can step on it if need be).
 

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I would hazard a guess that she knows putting the leash on while outside means an end to the fun, and that recall has often resulted in having to go home and end the fun.

Like 3GSD said, I would stop taking her to the dog park if she can't be enticed to go back on the leash, at the very least until this issue is resolved. Allowing her to play the game has made the habit worse.

In addition to 3GSD's advice, work on teaching the dog that recall and putting the leash on doesn't always mean an end to the fun. Sometimes it will, of course, but make it so more often than not they are released to go play again. Call the dog, reward with an awesome treat they rarely get, then release to go play again. You will have to start in your home and gradually move to higher distraction areas. I would even change your recall word, because the one you have been using is poisoned already. And when you call her the final time and need to leash up, have her sit and gently take her collar, reward, snap on the leash, reward heavily again and move on.

Another thing to work on is collar grabs. Many dogs don't like having their collars grabbed, whether because they just feel uncomfortable or know it means the fun will end, like your dog. You train this by gently touching their neck area (and sometimes you have to start someplace else if they're real skittish) where the collar is, rewarding with something awesome and praising, and then release. You work up to actually grabbing the collar and holding. It teaches the dog to enjoy being handled that way, and that having their collar held is rewarding and not scary or an end to the fun at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You are making it worse by making it an issue. I would not take her off leash. Let her drag it. I would not go to a dog park and let her play with other dogs either.

Most dogs develop an aversion to leashes because the leash means loss of freedom or it means end of play time. Your dog is playing the age old keep away game.

Keep it positive. Put the leash on feed treats. Take it off. Feed treats. Make it a positive non-event. Do this repeatedly at home. Last time? Just take it off, feed and then go on about what you are doing at home (IOW's make it so the leash going on does not mean you are doing something else like going for a walk or taking the fun out of things for her).

When you are out where you would normally take the leash off have two leashes. Take one off and let her drag the other leash. Again do the leash on; feed then leash off; feed routine. Since she is dragging the second leash you still have control (you can step on it if need be).
Thank you.


I would hazard a guess that she knows putting the leash on while outside means an end to the fun, and that recall has often resulted in having to go home and end the fun.

Like 3GSD said, I would stop taking her to the dog park if she can't be enticed to go back on the leash, at the very least until this issue is resolved. Allowing her to play the game has made the habit worse.

In addition to 3GSD's advice, work on teaching the dog that recall and putting the leash on doesn't always mean an end to the fun. Sometimes it will, of course, but make it so more often than not they are released to go play again. Call the dog, reward with an awesome treat they rarely get, then release to go play again. You will have to start in your home and gradually move to higher distraction areas. I would even change your recall word, because the one you have been using is poisoned already. And when you call her the final time and need to leash up, have her sit and gently take her collar, reward, snap on the leash, reward heavily again and move on.

Another thing to work on is collar grabs. Many dogs don't like having their collars grabbed, whether because they just feel uncomfortable or know it means the fun will end, like your dog. You train this by gently touching their neck area (and sometimes you have to start someplace else if they're real skittish) where the collar is, rewarding with something awesome and praising, and then release. You work up to actually grabbing the collar and holding. It teaches the dog to enjoy being handled that way, and that having their collar held is rewarding and not scary or an end to the fun at all.
Thanks to you too.

***

I will try all this advice out tomorrow and update! I don't have to be anywhere which I know is unhelpful as 1) it makes it more of a big deal, 2) makes me more likely to resort to handing it in what I know is the 'wrong' way out of desperation and 3) she won't be left on her own immediately after the walk is over (double end to fun!) so I can have all the time and patience in the world to work on it. Changing the 'poisoned' recall command might be a bit tricky as it's her name, but I will reserve that for when I know she will actually come and abandon 'come here' and replace with 'lead on' (have some cheese!) or something. It's tricky because she's absolutely fine with it in my flat (probably because this signals going out, haha) so it's hard to practice in a contained space. I suppose I could always try using the (fenced) tennis courts in the park if the problem escalates.
 
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