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Hello. I live in a two story house where my husband and I are renting the bottom floor, and we have two housemates on the top floor. We're fostering a dog, and after about 2 weeks, it seems she only bites and misbehaves when she is around me/in our house. She stays upstairs at night and for parts of the day, and she does well with not chewing their things, plays with her own toys, and has not bitten them much at all, just mouthing.

I've tried my housemate's advice of pressing my thumb onto her tongue when she mouths me, many times. Each time, she becomes more excitable and bitey when I do this, but I've watched him do it and she stops immediately for him. I've also tried yelping, standing up, and walking away when she mouths or bites me, then ignoring her for 10 second or so, but as soon as I sit back down on the couch she is back to mouthing increasingly harder on me.

The biting situations stem from when she chews on my couch or bag on the floor. When I say "ah AH" loudly and back her up from it, she moves her mouth from the object to my hands. After I scold her for biting me, she is even more excited, and tries harder to bite the objects around the house. This repeats until she is growling. Throughout this, she does not get pilo fur, and she does not raise her lips or display truly aggressive behaviour (as I know it, at least).

Today I was sitting on the couch and was petting her sides, trying to calm her down for a nap, and she began wriggling and whining loudly with her mouth open, then lunged at my face. She's outside now while I figure out what to do. I'm not hurt from the bites, save some bruising, but I'm getting worried since nothing I do seems to deter her, and it's directed only at me.

Also, the dog is female, and I am too. My husband and two housemates are male. Does the human's sex have anything to do with how a dog reacts to someone? I've heard it before, but never knew if it was actually accurate.
 

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She sounds like a typical young mouthy dog. From what you've described none of her behavior sounds aggressive. You are probably just reacting in a way that amps her up more. I would stop yelping and stop trying to physically get her to stop, because those are probably triggering her to play more. Grab a toy and see if you can redirect her to that. If you can't, get up and walk away and comletely ignore her. It can help to have her drag a leash and then you can just step on the leash or quickly tether her to something.
 

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Sex isn't an issue in this case, it is how the people interact with her.

The method that you described - yelping and leaving - is correct, continue doing it. It sounds like the Yelp doesn't excite her, but that your returning does excite her. This is normal. It can take 3 days for the reason for the yelping and withdrawing attention to get through to the puppy. So EVERY time she nips you, continue the process, but stay away longer - going out of sight may work better, effectively leaving her in a timeout. After you stay away for 2 min., then try to end interaction by putting her in the crate for 10 min. or separating from her in some way. Be careful not to use the crate as punishment, but more as safekeeping from the landshark for at least 10 min. Eventually, she'll link the yelp and your disappearance, and then she'll link the nip to the yelp... or that's the idea.
 

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The biting situations stem from when she chews on my couch or bag on the floor. When I say "ah AH" loudly and back her up from it, she moves her mouth from the object to my hands. After I scold her for biting me, she is even more excited, and tries harder to bite the objects around the house.
She could take this as a redirection, basically you're saying "Hey stop chewing the sofa, here's my hand to play with instead and when you bite we bite it gets super exciting and you make funny noises". If you're redirecting her make sure you have a good outlet to focus on instead!

I'd get everyone in the house to look up bite inhibition and pick a method they like (preferably a positive, unphysical one) and go from there.
Sounds like the pup is very used to being over threshold with you though, when are you doing the playing with her? Pups are notoriously sharky in the evenings when they're tired so if this is the main time you're playing with her then it's going to be more difficult.

maybe switch to doing training exercises where she can stay calm but still tire her out. If you want to play games where it focuses her energy away from your hands for a while, play fetch, play with a flirt pole, tug toy, scent games, recall training between two people, puppy zen etc. This will stop her from associating you with super exciting, unruly play with your hands and instead with good outlets where biting you is not involved.

If its in the evening then the dog may be needing to be taught an off switch instead of going into sharky mode. You do this by learning when the pup is tired and start some training before this happens. Physical exercise over excites and has a settling period so although it's tiring it's harder to come down from. Mental exercising is tiring and as long as your dog isn't getting frustrated it will calm the dog down and let them settle better in the evening. This is teaching an off switch as instead of learning when I'm tired I should get worked up until I crash, the dog will learn to just go to bed when it's in that state of mind meaning no uncontrollable biting.
 

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One of my current dogs was and is super mouthy. Tends to just grab random things, particularly when excited, and this used to include hands, clothes, etc. Since it wasn't aggressive, just stupid, I found it pretty easy to redirect her onto a more appropriate target, like a toy, like you'd do with a little puppy.

She's chilled out as she's aged.
 
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