Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My wife and I have had a 8 month old chihuahua that we might adopt from the Humae Society. His previous owner's kid dropped and broke his front left leg twice, causing it to be amputated. This happened when about two months again. We have had him for a week trial and loved him. He's already crate trained and only had a couple accidents in the house. He's been super playful and cuddly. However this has changed over the last couple nights.

About three nights ago we took him out to use the bathroom and somehow his collar managed to loosen up and get on his nub. He yelled like crazy for about a minute. I sat beside him and he calmly sat in my lap and let me take it off him. Before this he would do a simple warning nip rarely when picking him up. We would tell him no and he would then still let us pick him up. Now it's a more aggressive like trying to hurt us when trying to pick him up to take him upstairs to bed. Over the last few days we have been putting him to bed around 11:30. Do you think he may still just be traumatized from the collar incident or gets cranky sometimes cus he's tired? He will lay in our laps for hours letting us pet him but once we try and pick him up to take him to bed will run around the room and hide under furniture like he's scared or get in the corner of the couch and "defend" himself. Sorry for babbling so much but we asked for another week to try him out before we officially adopt him and wondering if anyone has any ideas to help with this. Thank You!!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,227 Posts
Perhaps he doesn't like getting picked up? He was badly hurt twice after getting picked up after all! Might try giving him a treat every time you must pick him up and most of the time encourage him to go where you need him to be rather than picking him up. My little dogs much appreciate getting moved with clapping and praise/treat and at first the younger one was likely to whip around/snap in fear if picked up without a treat in his face.

Perhaps the nub is hurting after the problem with the collar? I really think he's getting comfortable and telling you he doesn't like getting picked up though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,384 Posts
yes do feel the trauma of a recent event, and also never getting over the experience of a past event does play into this. Trauma events can take time and going slow in small steps to work through.

What would I personally do right now right now in order for you to do what needs to be accomplish while your working with this pups fears of being picked upped.. i would train towards the pup would go into a soft cat carrier, one that has a nice comfy cushion that the pup would enjoy. That way you can carry the pup where ever they need to go never having to touch them and they will be safe and secure for transport. When you get where your going you set the cat carrier down and leave the door open and let the pup decided when they ready to exit.

when you go to pick the pup up 'you have all the control and do all the advancing" i would work towards the pup doing the advancing to you.. like being able to hold out your hands for the pup to come to you and then just reward treat, verbal praise, physical praise, but don't pick them up.. the training session is over..


my friend had a parrot that started bitting her if she reached into his cage to get him to come out. she hadn't worked with him in a long time but she had had him since he was a baby.. Two thing I suggested was setting up his cage that the parrot could come out by himself and also using a perch (stick) for the parrot to climb on in place of her hand for the parrot to climb onto and be brought out of his cage. That way once the parrot was out of the cage she could go back and rebuild their relationship like they use to have when the Bird was on his play station of spending time together. And it worked.. one little area that was causing stress in the relationship solved,, so they could have the other time together rebuild the interaction and bond.. She doesn't need the perch stick any more... but they had to find a way in the beginning..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,257 Posts
First, the warning nip was exactly that-- a warning-- which, by telling him no and picking him up anyway, you taught him that A) a warning nip is useless because it doesn't get his message across and B) that means he has to increase the intensity of the warning, upping it to attempted biting

Getting picked up can be scary for a dog and more so if he has a history of painful, serious injuries by being picked up and dropped more than once. I suggest working very hard to minimize any need to pick him up as a starting point at least.

It sounds like the collar getting wrapped up on his nub was very painful (since you say he "yelled"). So its no surprise that he might try to "guard" his nub area.

For small dogs, a harness is much safer than a collar because of the risk of trachea collapse. And in his case, a harness can give him some physical support for balance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
First, the warning nip was exactly that-- a warning-- which, by telling him no and picking him up anyway, you taught him that A) a warning nip is useless because it doesn't get his message across and B) that means he has to increase the intensity of the warning, upping it to attempted biting

Getting picked up can be scary for a dog and more so if he has a history of painful, serious injuries by being picked up and dropped more than once. I suggest working very hard to minimize any need to pick him up as a starting point at least.

It sounds like the collar getting wrapped up on his nub was very painful (since you say he "yelled"). So its no surprise that he might try to "guard" his nub area.

For small dogs, a harness is much safer than a collar because of the risk of trachea collapse. And in his case, a harness can give him some physical support for balance.
We have talked about getting a harness but wasn't sure if it would work missing a front leg. We will run to PetSmart and try one on him make sure it'll still support him. We definitely agree with your theory about the warning nip. Sounds pretty common sense once you mentioned that. He doesn't seem to be bothered by touching his nub but I do agree that he could still be traumatized by it. Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
yes do feel the trauma of a recent event, and also never getting over the experience of a past event does play into this. Trauma events can take time and going slow in small steps to work through.

What would I personally do right now right now in order for you to do what needs to be accomplish while your working with this pups fears of being picked upped.. i would train towards the pup would go into a soft cat carrier, one that has a nice comfy cushion that the pup would enjoy. That way you can carry the pup where ever they need to go never having to touch them and they will be safe and secure for transport. When you get where your going you set the cat carrier down and leave the door open and let the pup decided when they ready to exit.

when you go to pick the pup up 'you have all the control and do all the advancing" i would work towards the pup doing the advancing to you.. like being able to hold out your hands for the pup to come to you and then just reward treat, verbal praise, physical praise, but don't pick them up.. the training session is over..


my friend had a parrot that started bitting her if she reached into his cage to get him to come out. she hadn't worked with him in a long time but she had had him since he was a baby.. Two thing I suggested was setting up his cage that the parrot could come out by himself and also using a perch (stick) for the parrot to climb on in place of her hand for the parrot to climb onto and be brought out of his cage. That way once the parrot was out of the cage she could go back and rebuild their relationship like they use to have when the Bird was on his play station of spending time together. And it worked.. one little area that was causing stress in the relationship solved,, so they could have the other time together rebuild the interaction and bond.. She doesn't need the perch stick any more... but they had to find a way in the beginning..
We have used a cat carrier a couple times in the car but not to take him upstairs. We leave it open downstairs so he can feel comfortable with it and he's even laid in it to relax or play. We might try this for starters and see if we can get him to feel more comfortable with picking him up again with treats. We've been doing all the advancing towards him so I believe that is an excellent idea about giving him a treat to come to us when called. Thank you!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,257 Posts
Not all harnesses will work with a missing front leg. Ruffwear Webmaster works well but I don't know if the smallest size would be small enough. Ruffwear Front Range might come in smaller. CleanRun Comfort Flex is another option. Julius K9 design should work. the key is not needing the front leg there to keep it from rotating around

Sibe might have suggestions as she has a 2-legged toy poodle who is probably smaller than your Chihuahua.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the recommendations. I'll check them out. I also sent her a message asking her. Thanks again!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,227 Posts
I don't think Ruffwear will fit a small chihuahua. Bucky is 14 pounds and sturdy, his XXS Ruffwear harness and pack are half way clinched up. I like the way the custom harness vests from Etsy fit my dogs, they are designed somewhat like Puppia's Soft Vest Harness. They have a shape to them rather than straps that can slide around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,910 Posts
Julius would work, but be aware their small dog designs don't really fit like a harness - ie: that 'chest' strap is right across the base of their throat.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top