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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

I just got a Corgi puppy, there is an area in my room where all my wires lie. I do not want him going into this area. What I have done is stand in front of it (after taking him out of the area) and say "no" in a soft, firm voice. He looks at me, barks, and bites my toes.

I am not sure what I should do!

I feel that I am losing his trust by having him bark at me, but I also want him to know he is not allowed in this area. What should I do?

Thank you all for any help in advance!

EDIT: He also likes to go into the corner of my room and dig at my carpet, what can I do about this?
 

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Back Talk! It's not uncommon for young dogs to give you back talk when 'reprimanded'.

The best thing to do is to close the door, or set up a baby gate to block it off. Another thing to do might be to put him into the crate when you can't watch him. Another thing to try is to tell him "Out" and carry him out of the room to the kitchen, to him bed, or some neutral area. He doesn't understand the word, "No" and he doesn't understand the word, "Out" yet.... So, it may take a few repetitions over a few days for him to begin to understand.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was thinking about just picking him up and putting him back in the pen but I'm afraid that'll associate it with a punishment...
 

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Look up boundary training by kikopup on youtube.

Also, you might want to work on teaching the dog what you want him to do instead of saying "no". For example, rewarding him for being on his bed in the other room. Saying 'no' doesn't teach him what you want him to do instead and he is likely barking at you because he is confused or wanting your attention.

Basically, start by setting up the situation you want in a way that your dog can't fail. Let's say you want your dog on his bed in the other room. You can use the pen so that he ONLY has access to the 'correct' space. This step is the most important step because it 100% guarantees success.

Then, reward your dog in that space. Use a stuffed kong, a chew item, toys, or some treats every now and then. Your dog will learn that THAT space is where all the good things happen.

Then, give it time. If you do it for a few months, by the time you remove the management tool (ie, pen, crate, leash, etc.) your dog will most likely choose to be in his space and not yours. Being in your space has never been a habit. Being in his space has been heavily rewarded.
 
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