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Hello, I'm posting about a dog that isn't mine but lives in the same house. My parents own three pugs. The first two are around 7 - 10 years old, and after owning and training my own dogs, I realize they've made several careless mistakes with the first two, and I'd really hate for them to do the same thing with the newest one. She's just over a year old and she's already showing strong aggression towards dogs she doesn't know or doesn't see often.

With the first two pugs, my parents just let them free roam the house as a puppy without any supervision and left them that way into adulthood and beyond. No training, no socialization, no nothing. They do their business all over the house, make the loudest racket when they hear someone outside the home or if the door bell is rung, and are willing to bite if you try and control them, such as trying to gently shove them out of the way if they're hogging the staircase. They also won't listen if you tell them to do something. I warned them that it's simply put, they weren't responsible throughout their lives, their dogs don't respect them. At least, I'm seeing it this way.

The youngest has had absolutely no socialization, she hasn't even been out in public with them. I'd personally take her out in public with me, but I'm not ready to drive on iced roads. Newbie driver. I'd just really hate for this pug's behavior to go down the drains because of how irresponsible my parents are. She's already tried to start a fight with my puppy, and then moved on to try and start a fight with my pitbull, which she normally gets along with really well. It's almost like she's shutting out all other dogs besides the other pugs she's with 24/7. I just want her to have a good, happy life where she can be friends with most dogs, and still be calm around other dogs she's not friends with instead of growling, lunging, and barking at them.

The other pugs? They're grumpy grumpy little brats. That's all I can describe them as. One of them gets all fussy if my pitbull is excited and running around, just playing. The pug will bark, growl, and eventually try and attack my pit. Sadly, she can't get to my pit too quick seeing as she's overweight and has arthritis as a result. This is the outcome of yet another mistake they made, food available at all times. I got on them about it, even after the fact that they knew it was hurting them. They're atleast cutting back on food given, but they won't go as far as to try and reverse what they've already done and are beginning to do again.

Can anyone suggest anything that could help, besides taking them out to Petsmart and training classes? I do plan on taking over completely once I have a job and get my first paycheck. Classes are only around 100, and I'd planned on spending my first few paychecks anyways. So, I'd definitely buy classes for her once I get my job. It's just, is there anything I can do, besides the two above, that can soften her aggression until then? She really is a good dog, very submissive to people, at least, it's just everything is starting to take hold of her behavior.
 

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I'm sorry to hear about that. But I'm glad you're taking an interest in the dogs well being.
My dog actually had a lot of aggression as a puppy, but we were lucky enough to be able correct it quickly. It will take a lot of work. There is unfortunately not a single simple solution and it's going to take some trial and error.

You have the right idea. The dog does need socialization and dog parks or even doggy day care - if you have one near by - are great.

First of all, does the dog show any other signs of aggression? For instance, with food or bones?

And are you able to notice the dogs warning signs before a fight?
(With my dog, he didn't give any verbal warnings; his eyes would just get wider and he would look out of the corner of his eye.) If you are able to recognize the signal a dog is giving before hand, this is the best time to correct the behavior.

In general, a good rule of thumb is to always introduce new dogs outside - on common ground. Sometimes the aggression can stem from territorial issues. You should let the dogs sniff each other without any tension on the leash (or if you can take them to a dog park that is fenced in, off leash is even better). Once the dogs seem to be ok with each other, you can them take them both inside.

If you see the dog is about ready to start a fight, make a noise to redirect the dogs attention (a firm 'Chh' or clicking sound usually work). Body language actually says a lot for dogs too, so you will need to make sure you are very firm him.

Teaching your dog tricks should also help with behavioral issues. Do they currently know any commands?
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I'm sorry to hear about that. But I'm glad you're taking an interest in the dogs well being.
My dog actually had a lot of aggression as a puppy, but we were lucky enough to be able correct it quickly. It will take a lot of work. There is unfortunately not a single simple solution and it's going to take some trial and error.

You have the right idea. The dog does need socialization and dog parks or even doggy day care - if you have one near by - are great.

First of all, does the dog show any other signs of aggression? For instance, with food or bones?

And are you able to notice the dogs warning signs before a fight?
(With my dog, he didn't give any verbal warnings; his eyes would just get wider and he would look out of the corner of his eye.) If you are able to recognize the signal a dog is giving before hand, this is the best time to correct the behavior.

In general, a good rule of thumb is to always introduce new dogs outside - on common ground. Sometimes the aggression can stem from territorial issues. You should let the dogs sniff each other without any tension on the leash (or if you can take them to a dog park that is fenced in, off leash is even better). Once the dogs seem to be ok with each other, you can them take them both inside.

If you see the dog is about ready to start a fight, make a noise to redirect the dogs attention (a firm 'Chh' or clicking sound usually work). Body language actually says a lot for dogs too, so you will need to make sure you are very firm him.

Teaching your dog tricks should also help with behavioral issues. Do they currently know any commands?
I'd consider a dog park, but the only one available around here isn't monitored for vaccinations, illnesses, etc., and I know there are tons of irresponsible dog owners. The first time we took our old malamute to the dog park, she caught Kennel Cough. I'm more comfortable with Petsmart and their training courses since they check a dog's health record for the classes.

At any rate, I'm very firm with all my dogs, seeing as I have a pitbull I train and I know they have a 'pack' mentality.

My mother has been trying to teach them sit for the past few months, sadly, and her methods aren't exactly the best. She just holds a piece of cheese and repeats 'sit' until they finally get tired of begging for it and relax. I say her methods are poor because the command should only be said once, and there should be hand signals. She also doesn't go any further than sit. I'm already beginning to work with training with her, just at random times during the day for around 5 or 10 minutes per 'session'.

She does growl before hand. I introduced her in my room, a place she only visits once every 3 or so months. Reason being is that she has a habit of instantly defecating upon entering. Now a porch potty is installed in my room so I can just place her on there. At any rate, my room belongs to Riley and Zoey, my two dogs. So, it shouldn't be anywhere near being seen as 'her' grounds. I'd take her out with Riley, but I don't have someone else to help me, should she become snappy. I mean, there'd be no one to pull her away, should that happen. And you may think, what about the parents? Eh well... They're too busy, as well.
 
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