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Hello all. My family is attempting E-collar training with 6 month old female black lab. We do not have shock prongs inserted on collar (yet). When we use beep or vibrate function she just barks at her surroundings and freaks out because she believes the stimulus is coming from there. I will call her twice, and then use e collar beep. She will spin in circles and bark/scrape/dig at surroundings. She is then fixated on that spot until I go and pick her up and bring her to another spot of house/yard and do verbal sit/stay training with treats. Any advice? Thank you
 

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She's already frustrated or anxious or fearful about the beeps... I don't think it's going to get any better when you actually shock her. What issues are you working on? There are ways to achieve your goal without using the shock collar.
 

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She's already frustrated or anxious or fearful about the beeps... I don't think it's going to get any better when you actually shock her. What issues are you working on? There are ways to achieve your goal without using the shock collar.
Thanks for the response. Currently using it when she jumps on tables, trying to get her to come when she’s not responding to vocal commands, and when she tries to steal food from our 2 year old
 

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It's not working, stop using it. these things are banned in many countries for a good reason, they are not training device they are simply a fear device.
Try getting in the help of a good trainer and by good trainer I mean one that uses positive reinforcement and not fear.
 

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Well, she clearly is responding to it negatively and there is a chance at 6 months that she hasn't actually learned what you are asking from her. I would not use an E-collar on a dog that is not fully trained and even with a trained dog, I would take it off if the dog is distressed and certainly never use the beeping or shock. Your dog is obviously distressed by the beeping which is why you should take off the E-collar and work more with her on the ques. Dogs aren't born knowing our language. Plus, she listens with treats, correct?
 

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Those are common problems and the good news is there are many easy solutions. Here are some free training videos from a professional trainer who is nationally recognized (Emily Larlham) all about teaching your dog to come when called:

Here is one that addresses jumping on tables:

And stealing food:

In general, it is important to remember that a 6mo puppy is still learning about the world and you need to employ a lot of management during this developmental period. Management includes tactics like putting the pup away when your child is eating, crating your pup when there's food on the table, clearing the table before giving your pup free roam, etc. You can also compromise in some ways. For example, if you want your dog near the family while eating, you can put a leash on her and step on her leash to prevent jumping. You can also give her a stuffed Kong or bone so that she has her own food project to work on while you eat your meal. This doesn't mean your dog is confined all the time, and it also doesn't mean you need to do this forever. If you are consistent about these practices for a few months, as your puppy goes through adolescence, she can have a lot more freedom when she matures - and you won't have to worry about unwanted behaviors.

Right now your puppy is going through development equivalent to kids going through the teenage stage. Biologically, your puppy's body is full of hormones that are changing her skeletal, muscular, and neurological systems as she reaches sexual maturity in a few months. Here's an analogy. Let's say you give a teenager your credit card, and on top of that you don't speak the same language so you can't tell the teen what she is allowed and not allowed to buy. You want the teenager to spend money on some things but not exceed a certain limit, or blow all the money on superflous things. But because the teen doesn't know what she's not allowed to do, she buys a bunch of clothes, games, food, jewelry... It gets out of control and you scold the kid every time she buys something that is not to your expectations. Yet you still have no way of telling her exactly how to use the credit card. This is basically like giving your puppy free roam of your house in all situations, and correcting her with a beep (or a shock, scolding, yanking, hitting, etc) when she does something you don't like. Sure, it might stop her in that moment. But the damage is done. If you scold your pup for jumping on the table, she has already jumped on the table and the habit gets a little stronger. Worse... like with teenagers and credit cards, and like with puppies that have too much freedom... If all you do is correct what you don't like, they just learn to do it when you aren't around to catch them. One pitfall that you probably don't want to fall into is the one where you constantly have to 'stay on top of' your puppy and correct her over and over again. It may feel like you are accomplishing something because the behavior you dislike stops when you intervene. But if you are repeating this over and over, day after day, the problem is not actually being solved.

The videos I linked you to, the advice of implementing management, and using positive reinforcement training, all help you proactively deal with these situations so that your puppy will learn to do exactly what you want her to do. And all this effort on the front end results in a dog you don't need to hyper manage in the future. I could leave a steak on the coffee table leave the room, and my dogs (one was ~70 lb and my current dog is 78) would not touch them.
 

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6 month old female black lab.
If ever there was a dog / breed that should respond extremely favourably to food treat training, it would be the breed you have.. I mean, as a general rule, they're TOTAL chow hounds. They've been known to stand on their heads and spit wooden nickels, for a single piece of kibble in return.

Really there's no need whatsoever to use force, fear or intimidation ( ie: shock, beep, vibrate) on a labrador, especially not on a lab puppy.
 

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I use Electronic collars in training. Have for years. You are using the collar incorrectly and what you are doing is not clear to the dog and, especially if actually stimming the dog, is unfair and cruel. Take the collar off the dog and go to one of the methods suggested by Canyx. This dog is TOO YOUNG for this training.

E collar training requires skill to use. If you are using it for recall you MUST first train the recall. This requires time and, in many cases, a long line (though not always). You start in the house. You make coming to you the BEST thing in the dog's life. If the dog does not come RUN AWAY.. most will chase.. and as she gets to you stop and FEED something DELICIOUS. Make that recall reliable WITHOUT the e collar FIRST.

Now, in another YEAR when the recall is good, if your dog starts to blow you off THEN you can introduce the e collar. Have someone who knows what they are doing help you.

It is VERY common for a dog that has no understanding of the e collar to associate the stim with something next to or near them in the environment. This can allow you to use the e collar to create aversion to snakes (if you live where there are poisonous ones).

Please take the collar off your puppy and put it away. Train your puppy FIRST and make that training solid. In another year find someone experienced who understands the use of the e collar to help you train with it. Do not do that now. Your dog is far too young.
 

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The others on this forum have given you excellent advice. Your pup is basically a baby and knows nothing. In order to use a tool like a an e-collar, you should a) be absolutely sure you know what you're doing or hire a professional (not a zap the dog for everything "professional", but a professional who understands dog behavior and understands that an e-collar is not a substitute for actual training, and b) thoroughly train all behaviors first and ensure the dog understands them.

Until the dog is older and has demonstrated that they know what a command is under all circumstances, put the e-collar away. You might find that most of her bad behaviors go away with proper management, training, and time.
 
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