Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,153 Posts
Yes, the SPCA in Canada/BC does euthanize animals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,340 Posts
they do, but from what I understand they are pretty low-kill. they'll move dogs from low population areas to shelters where they have a better chance of being adopted, and I've seen petfinder SPCA dogs up for quite a while before they disappear. I don't know if they have a time limit, but I do know that there is usually more than one application pending for a lot of dogs (mostly the small ones, puppies etc).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
I think it differs among the SPCAs. I know that most will euthanize animals that are not considered "adoptable", of course the definition of adoptable can vary greatly also. Animals who are sick, injured, or would require extensive behavior rehabilitation are often considered unadoptable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,779 Posts
Some info links:

http://www.spca.bc.ca/pet-care/health-safety/a-problem-you-can-fix.html

What Is Being Done in British Columbia to Deal With This Problem?

The official goal of the British Columbia SPCA is to reach zero euthanasia of adoptable animals - and we are making real progress. See our Pet Overpopulation page for more informatoin.


Pet Overpopulation page link which has no applicable stats (no applicable stats is a pet peeve of mine):

http://www.spca.bc.ca/welfare/campaign-issues/pet-overpopulation.html

Their PDF on Companion Animal Euthanasia, which has no applicable stats:

http://www.spca.bc.ca/welfare/position-statements/companion-animal-euthaniasia.pdf

------------------------------------------------------------

Oooooo . . . I just found some controversial links too. Don't have time to see if they are accurate, but you can check them out for yourself. The first reads as if no-kill (the definition that truly means no-kill for space and all healthy and adoptable are placed) has been the policy since 2004.

Mr Daniell says that the SPCA does not have euthanasia stats but in a August 2002 article in the Vancouver Courier, the SPCA seems to have them:

"Euthanasia at Vancouver SPCA shelters is down 62 per cent for cats and 26 per cent for dogs in the five months since the non-profit organization ended euthanization of animals for anything other than health reasons.

"B.C. SPCA euthanasia statistics were already among the lowest in North America when the "no-kill" policy was introduced. Of the 28,882 animals handled by the SPCA in the Lower Mainland last year, approximately 2,800-roughly 10 per cent-were euthanized, mainly for medical and temperament reasons. "

Perhaps the SPCA lost the euthanasia stats? It doesn't really matter as it just makes them up as it goes along anyway.


http://aaswatchdog.com/cgi-bin/newsroom.pl/noframes/read/5504

http://www.animaladvocates.com/spca.htm

I believe that a 90% save rate is what many that advocate "no-kill" consider the threshold line, where if you want to save more then exceptional medical intervention and rehab would have to be utilized.

SOB
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,153 Posts
Ack!! Really?? I didn't know that! How long do they give the animals before they're euthanized?
I don't think there is a "time limit".. I know when we had 10 cats come into the clinic to be euthanized, it was because they were on the verge of having an extremely contagious virus outbreak, so "head office" said that something like 30 cats had to go. Whereas I believe we've only had one SPCA dog put down and it was because it had been run over by it's owner and was all-but beyond help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,420 Posts
I'm so confused. Are kill shelters SPCA shelters, or other ones? Does anyone know if the SPCA in Canada euthanize their dogs after a period of time? Specifically the BCSPCA?
Yes, They do in Texas anyway. My girl Hope was siezed for neglect and in an SPCA shelter, she was taken from the SPCA by a no kill shelter, on the very day she was to be euthanized by the SPCA.

She is not aggressive in any way, to anybody, or any dog. She's a total sweetheart with a great GSD temperment. I think she was just mangy and had ear infections, torn up ears so she wasn't "pretty" and was a large GSD so not very likely to be adopted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,837 Posts
Our local SPCA does not euthanize on a time limit. Once the dogs are there, they're there to be adopted. They DO however euthanize any dog with food aggression, and I've had this discussion with them because I don't like it. They adopt out dogs who are DA (they obviously let one know) but dogs who fail the food aggression test are euthanized.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,714 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I don't have any problems with euthanizing sick animals, or ones that have severe aggression issues, etc. I'm always so heart broken when they euthanize perfect great pets because there's no more space or they are not likely to be adopted...

Thanks for the links spanielorbust! I'll definitely check those out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
849 Posts
I do not know why, but I never see the adoptable animals from my local SPCA on Petfinder- I have to go directly to their site. I do not know if they euthanize, but I do know that every spring they have a serious overpopulation problem and have a half-price sale.
"Clearance Puppies"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
I am in NJ and the SPCA's around here do euthanize. Its not a regular thing and I think they are pretty low kill. When we adopted last year (from SPCA) we were told that if they are totally full and the dog hasn't been adopted they usually try to reach out to other rescues/shelter to move the dog. Only if they are very old/unadoptable/ with some dangerous behaviour issues if they are euthanize. They did have rescue pull out application on their main page itself. They also usually contacted breed specific rescues for purebreds if they were not adopted in 2- wks or had some issues. However, even though numbers were very less they did euthanize.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
The BCSPCA euthanizes sick dogs and dogs with temperament issues (including those caused by long term kenneling). They do not euthanize dogs for space. The same cannot be said of cats although, IME, at most shelters they try very hard to avoid this. This is coming from someone who used to work at the BCSPCA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,765 Posts
The BCSPCA euthanizes sick dogs and dogs with temperament issues (including those caused by long term kenneling). They do not euthanize dogs for space. The same cannot be said of cats although, IME, at most shelters they try very hard to avoid this. This is coming from someone who used to work at the BCSPCA.
Yeah, the cat problem is one of true overpopulation. There are veryvery few open-intake shelters that can get by without killing cats, and even kittens. There are simply WAY too many cats being born.

Of course this thread is about SPCAs, but the Humane Society here says they "don't euthanize for space". I'm not sure exactly what that means about their policies (if they run out of space do they make up a behavioral problem to justify killing the animal?) but I guess it's a good start. Their kill stats don't seem to have been reduced, at least not the last time I saw a census (they used to have it on their website but now you have to request to see it). But they used to automatically kill bully breeds, now they don't, so I think they have progressed a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
Yeah, the cat problem is one of true overpopulation. There are veryvery few open-intake shelters that can get by without killing cats, and even kittens. There are simply WAY too many cats being born.

Of course this thread is about SPCAs, but the Humane Society here says they "don't euthanize for space". I'm not sure exactly what that means about their policies (if they run out of space do they make up a behavioral problem to justify killing the animal?) but I guess it's a good start. Their kill stats don't seem to have been reduced, at least not the last time I saw a census (they used to have it on their website but now you have to request to see it). But they used to automatically kill bully breeds, now they don't, so I think they have progressed a bit.
I wonder if they are open intake? I honestly believe that the only way shelters can avoid euthanizing cats for space is if they are not open intake. I know the BCSPCA I was at wasn't. We would take any and all stray's and kittens (adoptable and at least they're getting fixed) but if you wanted to surrender an adult cat, there was a waiting list and we were still overflowing.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,725 Posts
Most SPCAs are not affiliated with each other, so if one is, it doesn't neccessarily mean another is. I work at an SPCA in Kalamazoo, MI and we are "no-kill". The animal control agencies (some of which take nice names like SPCA) run by the government HAVE to follow open intake policies because they are funded by the government to take care of the pet population, plain and simple.

Of course this thread is about SPCAs, but the Humane Society here says they "don't euthanize for space". I'm not sure exactly what that means about their policies (if they run out of space do they make up a behavioral problem to justify killing the animal?) but I guess it's a good start. Their kill stats don't seem to have been reduced, at least not the last time I saw a census (they used to have it on their website but now you have to request to see it). But they used to automatically kill bully breeds, now they don't, so I think they have progressed a bit.
The term "don't euthanize for space" is TYPICALLY how no-kill shelters describe themselves. That is how the shelter where I work describes ourself. We will take in animals until we are at capacity and then sit until they're adopted, so we don't kill dogs/cats to make room for more because we are closed intake. HOWEVER, if a dog or cat has an extreme disease or wound that it comes down with while in our shelter (we won't knowingly take an animal we can't treat) that we do not have the resources to treat, or an extreme developed aggression, we will euthanize the animal. This is where each no-kill shelter is different though. Some will put down dogs for HW, we do not. We perform surgeries on dogs that need it, keep dogs/treat dogs for HW, lepto, parvo, etc. We put more dogs down for repeat attacks/biting even after having behaviorists and trainers work with them than we do for sicknesses. But never because we need space.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,946 Posts
Our local SPCA does not euthanize on a time limit. Once the dogs are there, they're there to be adopted. They DO however euthanize any dog with food aggression, and I've had this discussion with them because I don't like it. They adopt out dogs who are DA (they obviously let one know) but dogs who fail the food aggression test are euthanized.
Wow, is that ever dumb! IMO, it's a heck of a lot easier to rehabilitate a dog with food guarding issues than to rehabilitate a DA dog. And since most people feed their dogs in private, I think the DA dog presents a greater risk to the public.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,415 Posts
I don't know about Canada, but in the US, any shelter can call themselves "Humane Society" or SPCA. Some will euth for space. Some will euth if a dog contracts any disease...ie, kennel cough, ringworm, etc. Not just deadly diseases. Some give time limits. Many temperment test dogs, and if they show any fear/aggression, with food, people opening umbrellas, large dolls that look like kids trying to go up to them and talk in a squeaky voice, food aggression, etc. It's sad, because many dogs are fearful in a strange surrounding, especially if they were lost for a while, and will react to some of those things.

It's best not to let any pet you own get into that situation, and spay/neuter/microchip/use collars w/id tags when dogs are outside.

Our AC here has twice put down people's pets that were lost that they tried to claim at closing time, and were told that they needed to come back the next day. So they did. But the dogs had been euthed that morning by mistake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,531 Posts
Our local SPCA does not euthanize on a time limit. Once the dogs are there, they're there to be adopted. They DO however euthanize any dog with food aggression, and I've had this discussion with them because I don't like it. They adopt out dogs who are DA (they obviously let one know) but dogs who fail the food aggression test are euthanized.
This is because they are a high bite risk to humans, my daughter was severly bitten by a food aggressive dog that had a bite history and was pulled from a shelter and adopted out by a rescue (who didn't tell us the dog had a bite history). I have NO problem with this type of policy BECAUSE of just the situation I was put in (my daughter still has extensive scarson her face). I myself have taken dogs to be euthed when I have discovered food agression after accepting them into rescue, I refuse to be responsible for another child having their face ripped up by a food aggressive dog!
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top