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After seeking advise and doing online research I finally decided a Doberman is everything I'm looking for in a dog. Their super-protective and loyal nature combined with a love of attention and affection is exactly the right combination. I also appreciate their active lifestyles becaus I want a dog I can go running with or just be active with in the park. Plus I just love the way they look. I have a couple of questions.

I plan on buying as a puppy and I prefer to buy from a rescue so I can "save" a dog. Plus it's probably a lot easier on the wallet. But I also want to make sure I can buy the qualities that I'm looking for. First, and foremost I want to avoid buying a dog that will be proned to health problems. Aside from the cost invovled I also don't want to feel bad all the time because my dog is sick or not feeling well. I also want to make sure it is truely a pure Doberman and has the right temperment. I prefer one that is not overly aggressive but is also not shy, timid or passive. I've read that the latter is generally against their nature, but you can find some in that category.

I think being able to consult with a quality breeder would give me a better chance at getting what I'm looking for. But at the same time I'm not helping the problem with homelessness and I'm (guessing) they will probably run in the $1000 range? I don't mind spending the money but if I can fair just as well from a rescue that would be my preference.

The other factor to consider is location. We're stationed just outside Fort Bragg, NC and I would only want to buy a dog from a quality breeder or rescue. I'm willing to drive long distances within reason.

On an unrelated note; is it considered crewl to crop the ears and bob the tail? I plan on leaving mine natural but I was just curious. It seems to be a common practice.
I'm like Johnny Rescue on here sometimes I think. I'd highly recommend going for a rescue dog in your situation and here's why. You want a dog that's not going to be prone to health problems. Unfortunately, you can run into this with both rescue and breeders. Rescue dogs you can (sometimes) get a good health history of that particular dog though. Of course just because a dog has been healthy in the past doesn't mean it will be in the future. With a rescue you usually get an older dog do you know exactly what their temperament is like. A pup is always a crap shoot and sometimes laid back puppies become active adults and vice versa. Don't make the mistake of thinking that all breeds fit their breed standard. I own a cocker spaniel who's a couch potato and I ran into basset hounds that were highly active. With an older rescue dog you can (with a good quality rescue) get a good idea of the dogs activity level. There are doberman's who are lounge lizards.

As a side note with you being in the military and moving on a regular basis I would not consider owning a house to be a good move until you've mustered out and settled down in one place. Has nothing to do with owning a dog, but just my two cents.
 

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Well, AB, you got alot of information, there was no inter-net when I got my first dobie. If I read all this I would have most likley never considered a dobie. It gives the impression only the experts can have a doberman. BULL

I got my doberman from my First/Sergeant for $250, I guess people would call him a BYB. I did not even care about the papers, he looked like a dobie to me that was good enough for me! :D There was nothing complicated about the whole affair. Oh, and I coddled my dog all his life, and he loved it! Having the ears cropped is a good idea, they look better and I like the bell cut. less removed and it never took close to six months to complete. I cannot remember if it to more then six weeks , but the procedure was over fast.

If you have lived with family that owned dogs then you have alot of OJT, and did turn out to be my wifes protector, I guess he new I took care of him he takes care of my wife. She also loved that dog very much and there was never a intimadation problem between my wife and the dog! Most military wifes, are not wimps, as you well know goes with the life style!

Bottom line you want a dobie, get your feet wet and get one ASAP!:)

Oh he had no medical issues what so ever, I did not pay out thousands, He died of old age and the medical problems associated with growing old!
 

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If the OP wants a puppy, why suggest an older dog?

I think that the OPs best bet if he's got his heart set on a puppy is to go through a good breeder. With dobies, it is important to be very vigilant in choosing a breeder.

I love this forum, but on a personal note, I often think that people who either buy from good breeders are looked down upon because they don't rescue.

I do not think that a rescue dog is a good fit for every situation. In many cases, a rescue dog that has been in a shelter situation will not express its true personality until it is comfortable in the home.

Many times, it is then that issues can occur.

I try not to suggest rescues to people unless they are very knowledgable about dogs in general. I think it is worse for people to think they are getting one thing, and then end up with another.

Although this is true for anyone buying any dog, it is easier to see what kind of temperment you get if you can meet either the sire or the dam, or both.

This is not to say that I am anti-rescue. My boyfriend and I have a rescue dog who is very loved, and I think that if people know how to handle dogs who have been in less then ideal situations growing up and if the genuinely want to save a life, then by all means they should do it.

I just don't think that painting an older rescue dog as the be-all-end-all is accurate advice. I think that the OPs needs and wants need to be taken into consideration so that the puppy will remain in its home forever.
 

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If the OP wants a puppy, why suggest an older dog?

I think that the OPs best bet if he's got his heart set on a puppy is to go through a good breeder. With dobies, it is important to be very vigilant in choosing a breeder.

I love this forum, but on a personal note, I often think that people who either buy from good breeders are looked down upon because they don't rescue.

I do not think that a rescue dog is a good fit for every situation. In many cases, a rescue dog that has been in a shelter situation will not express its true personality until it is comfortable in the home.

Many times, it is then that issues can occur.

I try not to suggest rescues to people unless they are very knowledgable about dogs in general. I think it is worse for people to think they are getting one thing, and then end up with another.

Although this is true for anyone buying any dog, it is easier to see what kind of temperment you get if you can meet either the sire or the dam, or both.

This is not to say that I am anti-rescue. My boyfriend and I have a rescue dog who is very loved, and I think that if people know how to handle dogs who have been in less then ideal situations growing up and if the genuinely want to save a life, then by all means they should do it.

I just don't think that painting an older rescue dog as the be-all-end-all is accurate advice. I think that the OPs needs and wants need to be taken into consideration so that the puppy will remain in its home forever.
Yeah, I do insist on a puppy. I want to be there for the puppy years, plus we have two cats. They might not take kindly to a big, intimidating Dobey suddenly in the home and I worry about their prey instincts. I think a puppy who's smaller and brand new to the world will allow the dog and the cats to accept each other more efficiently.
 

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I am also interested in owning a doberman in possibly a few years. I have heard that the red ones tend to have more problems because of closer breeding lines or something of that nature.
 

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No, the red's don't have any more problems due to breeding than the blacks. However, the Blue and Fawns DO have more coat problems due to the gene that causes the coloration. The key is finding a responsible, reputable breeder, I recommend you go through the breed clubs do so.

USAP, Do TONS of research on the lines you want and what you want from that line and the dog. Be sure the WHOLE family is involved in the training of the dog and you'll be fine. Remember, the breeder will be there for you for the LIFETIME of the dog, if anything ever happens that you can't keep the dog FOR ANY REASON, the breeder will be there to take the dog and rehome it so it NEVER ends up in rescue. Yes, there are breeders like that, my mother was one. I share her love of the breed, but unfortunately I'm a Military wife and don't have the time or the stability to be involved in the breed as she was (showing, breeding ect). She got out of 10 years ago and passed a year and a half ago or I could have asked her who the great lines are now. I literally pulled myself up on a dobe and used one to learn to walk.
 

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Thanks Carla for the Doberman talk web site, I have always been extremely fond of the breed. I just assumed you did like wise, and not a history deeply involved in the breed. I am sure you have acquired alot of knowledge from your mom, and the number one,go to person on this site for dobies. :) I liked the story how your dobies help you walk, now thats starting young!! You have my respect!
 
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