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I've heard that dogs aren't too good with "past time" and "future time", i.e. they live in the moment.

But Mabel seems to understand when I hold up one finger and say "One minute", as in "I'll be with you in one minute."

It's different from "Stay" because she'll leave (go in other room, etc) and return about a minute later. (No, I haven't tried "Two minutes" to see if she can count :D)

Do you have a command for "Not right now, but soon." Does your dog understand it?
 

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I do but, not in the same context as what you're doing. I use a Wait command when I will not be coming back to the dog (as in a Stay) and another command is coming....Wait for it. I also use a single finger (no, not that one) to distinguish that difference between the Stay and the Wait.
 

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That's rather interesting :)

I've sorta had a stay/wait, but then I didn't see the point, since, like TooneyDogs, "wait" for me isn't anything like what you've taught. If both are just going to mean, don't move until I release you or give another command, I might as well just use one of them and go with that.

I think I'm going to go for the do whatever until I give you another command approach as well. So if I say "lie down" that stands until I give another direction or the release. Seems less confusing for the dog?

That said, I am trying to develop something similar, but not too successful so far :)
 

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i have a wait command for iorek for things like getting out of the car and stuff like that. i also have a "wait for mommy" command that is for him to stop and wait for me when we are walking, like if i have to pick up poopie or if i have to tie my shoe or something like that.
 

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If both are just going to mean, don't move until I release you or give another command, I might as well just use one of them and go with that.

In competition obedience a Stay means Stay...no matter what..never, ever move even if the dog hears other commands (like from the ring next to you where other dogs are working) so, out of necessity some of us make that Stay/Wait distinction. In Stays, you always go back to the dog and never call/command a different action.
 

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I use the "Wait" command all the time with Lola. I use it for when I open her crate in the morning she is not allowed out even with the door open until I say "Come on" if she does come out even if I am in another room I have her go back in it and "Wait" again. I use it when I feed her in the morning and evening. What I do is I measure out her food, put it in her bowl, put the measuring cup back and then she will look at me until I say "Eat". I use the "Wait" command for when we are crossing the street and I also use it for when she is getting out of the car. In addition I use the "Wait" command at the dog park before giving her a treat. In that instance I will have her sit and then wait I then walk about 75-100 feet away from her then turn around and call her. She then comes running full speed for her treat. If she has broken the sitting position I then have her start over from where she broke the sit.
 

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I've worked on that too with a great deal of success . I dont even have to say anything anymore , just hold up the finger and he seems to know what it means.


But Mabel seems to understand when I hold up one finger and say "One minute", as in "I'll be with you in one minute."
 

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I do but, not in the same context as what you're doing. I use a Wait command when I will not be coming back to the dog (as in a Stay) and another command is coming....Wait for it. I also use a single finger (no, not that one) to distinguish that difference between the Stay and the Wait.
Exactly what I do. Wait means "Hold still as you ARE.. more is coming!"

She likes "wait" because she wants to know "what next?"

Stay is flat footed boring... and she will exhibit that very clearly to me. :p
 

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I use the wait command when getting out of the car, ect. like ioreks_mom said. Bella loves that command!! She get so impatient she will take her foot and touch as if to say "Hurry up, Mom".
 

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I use the wait command with Susie when I am out with her and riding my horse. If she is ahead of me and we are coming up to a road, or someone walking, I say WAIT which means stop until I catch up to you and tell you what to do. WAIT means stop walking but she can stand, sit or lie down. STAY means do not move from the Position I have left you in, Sit, Down or Stand. I always say WAIT whenever I get out of a Vehicle until I tell the dogs it is alright to get out, or not. Nothing worse than your dog leaping out of the vehicle every time you open the door.
 

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I use the "wait a minute" command with hand signal. I also reserve the "stay" command when I'm serious about, don't move until I release you. I don't use "stay" too much with Ilya because he isn't always motivated to please.

Tooney -- your avatar cracks me up everytime I see your post. I love the "matter of fact" look your dog has as if he/she is posting the comment. :D
 

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I use Wait for many things. Mostly wait to go through doors, jump out of the car, or take that thing off the ground.
 

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In competition obedience a Stay means Stay...no matter what..never, ever move even if the dog hears other commands (like from the ring next to you where other dogs are working) so, out of necessity some of us make that Stay/Wait distinction. In Stays, you always go back to the dog and never call/command a different action.
Very Interesting.

I will have to add this to the list of things to teach/improve. Looks like a lot of things I've done have "implied" Waits and maybe I've never taught "Stay" at all? :eek:
 

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I beg to differ. A lot of obedience people use "stay" for everything. My own competition obedience dog was taught a very reliable "stay", a very rock solid stay, and that carried into the recall exercise. HOWEVER, said dog can ALWAYS tell what we are doing, since my body language is different for the recall. He's Q'd every time he's stepped into the ring. No differently than the "wait" dogs.

I never make a distinction. I might possibly try it with the next dog, but maybe not.
 

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Tooney -- your avatar cracks me up everytime I see your post. I love the "matter of fact" look your dog has as if he/she is posting the comment. :D
Thanks. It's an acrylic painting that I got for Christmas from my wife. She sent an older photo of my dog to an artist she found on the internet....really surprised (and thrilled) me!

I beg to differ. A lot of obedience people use "stay" for everything.
You're right....that's why I said "some of us" make a distinction. I just never want the Stay thing to be one of my questions for any failure to respond to a command ie; not coming on recall, not taking the broadjump or not doing the signal exercise.
 

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I have always used the stay command only but I do agree with the statement below, as it just makes sense and I think in any competition where a stay is used it might give one the tiniest edge. In bird-dog comp. we used "whoa" instead of stay, the dog did not move unless you tapped dog's ear for relocation of a bird. At pickup time you whoaed dog and clipped lead to collar. Any movement on a whoa without a touch was always dog's fault.

I just never want the Stay thing to be one of my questions for any failure to respond to a command ie; not coming on recall, not taking the broadjump or not doing the signal exercise.

I do believe were I to build an Obedience Competition dog now the wait command because of common sense attitude would be used.
 
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