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I've seen them in movies and tv shows,but never heard of anyone actually have or use any.Do they work,and if so,could it used in training?
 

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You'll hear good and bad about them from users who tried to stop their dogs from barking, etc. It's just a sound that can interrupt behavior... a sharp hand clap will do the same thing and is certainly cheaper. If you're thinking of using it for distance work, I don't think the sound travels as far as a Shepards whistle which is more common, especially for herding. Some trainers use the Shepards whistle for emergency recalls.
 

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I think it partially depends on the quality of the silent whistle. But shepherd's whistles do have a longer range and I think that perhaps many dogs soon figure out that their owner can't really hear the silent whistle and so learn to ignore it (another version of selective canine deafness LOL).
 

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They work reasonably well if your dog is trained to whistle commands. I've never seen one that is actually silent, but I understand that some people can't hear the frequency they operate at (the better ones are adjustable).

The good: they are not as ear shattering as "police" whistles and the competition whistles. If you're at the park, you don't need 120 db to call your dog.

The bad: you really have no way of knowing whether your dog can hear the whistle at extended yardage, or if he is merely ignoring you. When I blow my Fox40, I can hear the echo bouncing off the treeline a mile away. If my dog is ignoring my whistle commands at a mile distance, I need an ATV and not a better whistle.
 

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This is what I use. It's around my neck all the time. I started using it with my black lab and, even when he got older and his eyesight was failing, he would come running when he heard it. (Sometimes I'd have to wave my arms to help him pinpoint my location.)

When I'd use it at the dog park, I was always surprised that other dogs wouldn't respond. Apparently whistle training is a novelty in our area.

I don't see any particular advantage to a silent whistle unless you are trying to be particularly unobtrusive. It's hard to be unobtrusive with a 115# dog galloping toward you at full bore.
 

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This is what I use. It's around my neck all the time. I started using it with my black lab and, even when he got older and his eyesight was failing, he would come running when he heard it. (Sometimes I'd have to wave my arms to help him pinpoint my location.)

When I'd use it at the dog park, I was always surprised that other dogs wouldn't respond. Apparently whistle training is a novelty in our area.

I don't see any particular advantage to a silent whistle unless you are trying to be particularly unobtrusive. It's hard to be unobtrusive with a 115# dog galloping toward you at full bore.
Well, there is an advantage when you're a mean snot-nosed kid (as I was)and want to abuse a neighbor who had 4 or 5 dogs and could never understand why there was such an uproar when I rode by on my bike. Actually since there was no noise to speak of they never even suspected me.

I agree with the no advantage for it though as whether it's a command / a whistle/ a hand signal etc. I want to know positively my dog can hear/see it otherwise training is going to be setback. What's worse than using a corretion for something that is not the dog's fault.
 

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This is what I use. It's around my neck all the time. I started using it with my black lab and, even when he got older and his eyesight was failing, he would come running when he heard it. (Sometimes I'd have to wave my arms to help him pinpoint my location.)

Shaggydog - sorry to hijack your thread. Hopefully this will be useful:

Ron - do you use the whistle for all recalls or just for certain kinds, e.g. outside, long distance? Do you think a whistle works better for recall than voice/hand (assuming you always have your whistle on you!)? I've been thinking of trying it since I'm not sure my dog can hear my voice in some situations (e.g. loud beach). I'm thinking a whistle could help. Thoughts?
 

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Most dogs seem to respond better to a whistle than voice--at least my voice--assuming they're trained to it. The higher pitch of a whistle seems to get their attention better than my deeper male voice. It certainly pierces the background noise of a windy beach w/crashing surf better than I can without mechanical assistance.

I also suspect that the high pitch of a whistle is less threatening than my bellowing for him to come. When I'm trying to make my voice carry, it probably sounds like an angry Grizzly.
 

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Most dogs seem to respond better to a whistle than voice--at least my voice--assuming they're trained to it. The higher pitch of a whistle seems to get their attention better than my deeper male voice. It certainly pierces the background noise of a windy beach w/crashing surf better than I can without mechanical assistance.

I also suspect that the high pitch of a whistle is less threatening than my bellowing for him to come. When I'm trying to make my voice carry, it probably sounds like an angry Grizzly.
Thanks - that makes sense. For me, substitute angry Grizzly with Glinda Good Witch of the South with laryngitis and a tin ear - not a pretty sound nor one any creature would want to get closer to!
 

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I would have to say it all depends on the dog and the quality of the whistle. I use a silent whistle with Cricket for her training because she responds to it better then anything, even clickers. However for Angel we do clicker training, which she responds to better and both are GSD mixes. Both have their own personality and based on that they do better under certain circumstances. Just like everyone here has a different opinion on things. So, honestly if you are interested in it, try it, if it doesn't work then try something different next time.
 

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I've seen them in movies and tv shows,but never heard of anyone actually have or use any.Do they work,and if so,could it used in training?
"Do they work?"
Yes they "work". A "normal" dog will hear a good quality "silent whistle". Whether he/she will respond to it, will be up to your training methods and expertise.

Before bedtime, we let the dog out. When it's time for him to come in, if he's off roaming our property, and I'm not sure where he is, I'll use the silent whistle (rather than calling out and disturbing the neighbours). It works well.
 

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I can actually hear most dog whistles. I can't hear what most people say, but dog whistles I hear quite well.

I use mine as an emergency recall. When he hears it, he knowns to come running no matter what.
 

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Ron - do you use the whistle for all recalls or just for certain kinds, e.g. outside, long distance? Do you think a whistle works better for recall than voice/hand (assuming you always have your whistle on you!)? I've been thinking of trying it since I'm not sure my dog can hear my voice in some situations (e.g. loud beach). I'm thinking a whistle could help. Thoughts?
I use it when my dogs can't see me or if they are at a distance where I'd have to shout. I don't like shouting.

Cubby was 99.9% reliable with the whistle. The only time he failed to respond to it immediately was when he was rolling in a rotten carp. (It was too late anyway.) He heard the whistle and looked up at me as if to say, "I'm almost done here. Just give me a minute." 30 seconds later he came running and I wished I had a "go-away" whistle.

Esther and Molly are somewhat less than 100% - maybe more like 60%, which means I wouldn't count on the whistle outside of the fenced yard.

It's a wonderful tool if you use it but a dog who doesn't have reliable recall isn't going to come running just because you blow on a whistle.
 

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I have a friend who has one and they do work in the sense that the dog hears them. Whether they respond or not is a different issue.
 

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Well, there is an advantage when you're a mean snot-nosed kid (as I was)and want to abuse a neighbor who had 4 or 5 dogs and could never understand why there was such an uproar when I rode by on my bike. Actually since there was no noise to speak of they never even suspected me.

I agree with the no advantage for it though as whether it's a command / a whistle/ a hand signal etc. I want to know positively my dog can hear/see it otherwise training is going to be setback. What's worse than using a corretion for something that is not the dog's fault.
I have a pug that is very trainable and has done really well with responding to hand signals and voice commands. I wanted to take her training to the next level and avoid annoying my neighbors when I let her off lead in the yard. I recently bought 2 dog "Silent" dog whistles. She has responded to these very well also, however, I was very disappointed when I discovered they are not silent at all. Although they emit a high-pitched sound, humans can clearly hear the tones produced. They are adjustable , but thye are audible through the entire range. Has anyone had a similar experience? MORE IMPORTANTLY, can anyone recommend a brand of whistles that are truly silent to the human ear (and suggest where to buy)? The 2 whistles I have are pictured here. Thanks in advance for any advice.
[/IMG]

I have a pug that is very trainable and has done really well with responding to hand signals and voice commands. I wanted to take her training to the next level and avoid annoying my neighbors when I let her off lead in the yard. I recently bought 2 dog "Silent" dog whistles. She has responded to these very well also, however, I was very disappointed when I discovered they are not silent at all. Although they emit a high-pitched sound, humans can clearly hear the tones produced. They are adjustable , but thye are audible through the entire range. Has anyone had a similar experience? MORE IMPORTANTLY, can anyone recommend a brand of whistles that are truly silent to the human ear (and suggest where to buy)? The 2 whistles I have are pictured here. Thanks in advance for any advice.
[/IMG]
This is the other one.
 

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Found this thread while searching for a new dog whistle I misplaced. Some love it and say they work, some hate it and say they don't work at all. It all really depends on the brand. Some have good reviews and bad, you just have to read them.

Many people have the thought that it is completely silent. You can still hear it, but it is not loud like a whistle or a shout. Some say dogs respond better to the dog whistle than a shout or clap.

I find it very useful especially if the dog responds to it very well.

This article should help you find the best dog whistle for you:

http://deviceraters.com/top-3-dog-whistle/
 

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I read your post, and wanted to help! You can get a silent dog whistle between 16-28 kHz, and humans should not be able to hear that level of sound unless they are super human! Anyway hope this helps!
 
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