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And don't adopt an animal if you're lifestyle can't handle one!

I work at an animal hospital. Even though it's a cushy little hospital in the suburbs, I see more than my fair share of neglect and hear more than enough stories that make me shake my head.

We do boarding, and a regular boarder came in. The owners complained that there 3-yr old lab/chow mix was tearing up the house and had a lot of energy. While the doctor is explaining training options and possibly medicating with prozac, the owner interrupts and says 'We'd like to put her down. It's too much.' Even with suggesting some foster homes and such, they were adamant on putting 3yr old Samantha down. I had to help bag her. The kicker? They didn't even want the ashes, leash, or collar.

Today I had to hold an old husky for an exam. The ear was so highly infected that I had to breath into my shirt; the smell was that putrid. When the doctor called the owners and asked if we could administer cortisone shots to their dog because he was in obvious pain, the owners refused saying 'Oh, he always gets ear infections. They heal on their own. No, don't give her anything.'

Not to mention the women who brought her cat in (that she bought from a pet store) and didn't want to spay her. She wanted to 'breed' her first because 'she's so pretty!'. I wanted to scream 'LADY DO YOU KNOW HOW MANY CATS NEED HOMES?! HAVE YOU VISITED A SHELTER LATELY?!'

The first time I ever bagged a dog, it was an old rotti. The owners kept him outside, and would go on vacations and depend on the neighbors to 'keep an eye on him'. Well, one weekend the poor thing died. It was cold, rainy, and they brought the corpse in 4 days after he died. Nobody bothered that whole weekend to check on the dog. It was way past initial rigor mortis and was now started to decompose, not to mention it has been lying on a rain drenched surface.

I think my biggest pet peeve is the people who feed their dog crap dog food, or way too much food. The last month a 90lb beagle boarded. What he was being fed? 2 cups of Kibbles N Bits twice a day. My 35lb German shepherd mix doesn't even eat that much, and she sure as hell doesn't eat Kibbles N Bits. Feeding your dog crap dog food is like feeding your child candy every meal.

Sorry for the rant. I just wish more people would research an animal before they bought them.
 

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“Pet” shops use the natural appeal of puppies, kittens, and other animals to sell these animals at an inflated price, which is often several hundred dollars—and sometimes more —for “purebred” animals. Common problems in the pet shop industry include selling sick and injured animals to the public, failing to provide proper veterinary care, keeping animals in unsanitary conditions, and using inhumane methods to kill sick and unwanted animals. You can help bring about changes in local pet stores if you know what conditions to look for and what steps to take. The vast majority of dogs sold in pet shops are raised in “puppy mills,” breeding kennels located mostly in the Midwest that are notorious for their cramped, crude, and filthy conditions and for their continuous breeding of unhealthy and hard-to-socialize animals. Birds, rabbits, and mice and other rodents are often mistakenly thought of as “starter pets” and sell very well, so pet shops keep their stores stocked with them. They, too, come from mill-like breeding facilities or from mom-and-pop operations that aren’t even minimally regulated. Sugar gliders, chinchillas, tarantulas, some bird and reptile species, and others are often called “exotics.” The journey for many of these animals begins in places such as Australia, Africa, and the jungles of Brazil. Closer to home, 20,000 prairie dogs are torn from their homes in Texas every year and shipped to pet stores.
 

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. Sugar gliders, chinchillas, tarantulas, some bird and reptile species, and others are often called “exotics.” The journey for many of these animals begins in places such as Australia, Africa, and the jungles of Brazil. Closer to home, 20,000 prairie dogs are torn from their homes in Texas every year and shipped to pet stores.
Um, actually, gliders and birds, at least, are all bred in the US. That doesn't make their breeders good, but birds haven't been imported for retail in large numbers in 15 years. Australia has someof the strictist animal export laws in the world, and NONE of the species that originated there (parakeets, budgies, cockatoos) are exported from there anymore.

I'm also not sure about your prairie dog figure. I'm ambivilent about those being sold at retail stores - they've got very specialized needs, and obviously make poor pets for anything but very dedicated pet owners, but at the same time, they're considered a pest species by many folks.
 

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I'm also not sure about your prairie dog figure. I'm ambivilent about those being sold at retail stores - they've got very specialized needs, and obviously make poor pets for anything but very dedicated pet owners, but at the same time, they're considered a pest species by many folks.
You know, I just heard that the pet store in our mall has prairie dogs. I haven't gone to see, but I was in utter shock when someone told me this. I am really hoping the person that told me this was mistaken... I can't imagine anyone actually wanting one of those as a pet and seriously thinking that it'd make a good pet.

Jayem-
The owners complained that there 3-yr old lab/chow mix was tearing up the house and had a lot of energy. While the doctor is explaining training options and possibly medicating with prozac, the owner interrupts and says 'We'd like to put her down. It's too much.' Even with suggesting some foster homes and such, they were adamant on putting 3yr old Samantha down. I had to help bag her. The kicker? They didn't even want the ashes, leash, or collar.
Wow that is so sad. Why would anyone refuse to rehome their dog and insist to have it put down?
 

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I have a couple questions for the OP.

1. Did the vet or anyone else in the office report the owner of the husky with the bad ear infection to animal control? In most states, counties and cities there are laws regarding neglect and not giving proper medical care to an animal.

2. Why didn't the vet refuse to put down the young 3 year old dog? Many vets would have.
 

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Whether you gaze into the sad eyes of the puppy in the pet store window and want to "rescue" the lonely pooch, read the ad in the newspaper and the couple seems so trustworthy, or find a website with photos of green hills and beautiful puppies that insists the puppies will only be sold to "loving families"... beware! Puppy mills frequently house dogs in shockingly poor conditions, particularly for the "breeding stock" animals who are caged and continually bred for years, without human companionship, and then killed, abandoned or sold to another "miller" after their fertility wanes. The result is hundreds of thousands of puppies churned out each year for sale at pet stores, over the Internet, and through newspaper ads. If you want a dog in your life, please don't buy a puppy mill puppy. Pet stores cater to impulsive buyers and consumers seeking convenient transactions. A "USDA-inspected" breeder does not mean a "good" breeder. Many disreputable "breeders" sell their dogs directly to the public over the Internet and through newspaper ads. Reputable breeders care where their puppies go and interview hopeful adopters.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have a couple questions for the OP.

1. Did the vet or anyone else in the office report the owner of the husky with the bad ear infection to animal control? In most states, counties and cities there are laws regarding neglect and not giving proper medical care to an animal.

2. Why didn't the vet refuse to put down the young 3 year old dog? Many vets would have.
TBH, I have no clue if they reported. They've 'tried' treatment in the past (who knew if they stuck to it since most owners will administer ear meds for the first couple of days and then stop) so technically I don't think officials could do anything. I like to chart spy :)

And for #2, I have no clue. Unfortunately, a few doctors of the clinic are financially driven, and I think the drop in funds has made some of them desperate. It's extremely sad and disgusting. I could be very wrong, though. I chart-spied this case, too, and the owner's also claimed they did call ONE foster agency but they were full. I guess calling at least one (despite numerous other suggestions of open agencies) is enough to please officials.
 

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There are rescues and shelters which carry not only dogs and cats, but just about every kind of small animal as well--rats, hamsters, guinea pigs, rabbits, birds, reptiles, etc. The only way to break the cycle of homeless animals in shelters, abuse of animals in pet stores, and by initially well-intentioned pet owners is to stop all demand for the animals in the pet stores. At rescues and shelters, potential adopters are screened and qualified. When at all possible, you should buy supplies for your animals at pet stores that do not carry animals or support online sites that are not part of corporate organizations which carry animals, such as PetsMart and Petco which should not patronized. If most pet stores don't have a clue as to where their animals come from, how are you to know? Are you under the impression that every private home takes great care of their animals and that they are healthy and not pregnant? Pet store owners and managers don't go to the homes of the breeders or even the facilities of the distributors to check out the condition of their animals. Don't go home from a store wishing you had said something. Please patronize stores that do not carry animals.
 

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TBH, I have no clue if they reported. They've 'tried' treatment in the past (who knew if they stuck to it since most owners will administer ear meds for the first couple of days and then stop) so technically I don't think officials could do anything. I like to chart spy :)

And for #2, I have no clue. Unfortunately, a few doctors of the clinic are financially driven, and I think the drop in funds has made some of them desperate. It's extremely sad and disgusting. I could be very wrong, though. I chart-spied this case, too, and the owner's also claimed they did call ONE foster agency but they were full. I guess calling at least one (despite numerous other suggestions of open agencies) is enough to please officials.
#2 is a hard situation. I'll be honest, if I found myself in a situation I had a hard to place breed of dog with no unique characteristics and just could not keep them any longer and no kills locally were full? (I can't imagine ending up in this situation, but AM talking hypothetically) I would seriously consider having the dog put down at my own familiar vet, rather than sending them to an open admission kill shelter. Which is better? A good end in familiar circumstances, or a miniscule chance at adoption?
 

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The few laws and penalties that exist hardly dissuade dealers when compared to the money that can be made from smuggling: Prices on animals’ heads range from a few bucks for a giant cockroach to tens of thousands of dollars for a hyacinth macaw. Animals in pet shops are often subject to inadequate care from people who are unprepared or unable to provide for their needs; many of these animals will be abandoned, or they will die from neglect or improper care. Healthy young animals are usually energetic and have shiny coats. Look for signs of ill health, such as listlessness, diarrhea, emaciation, dull coats, runny eyes, and dry noses. Sick animals should never be housed with healthy ones. Check the general sanitation conditions; notice signs of cockroach infestation, rodent droppings on the floor, and rusty or dirty cages. Also look for algae or scum in water bottles, empty water containers, or animals having difficulty drinking from them. Dogs must have water (it can be in a bottle), and there must be some sort of solid flooring (if a tray is used, it must be flat on the floor). There should be no more than one large dog in a single cage. Look for signs of distemper and parvovirus: runny stool and clogged, dry noses.
 

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Jayem, I hear your pain.

My vets will not PTS animals for other than severe beahvioral issues or health issues or if they are to be PTS under court order.

In the area we have one animal shelter and it is a no kill shelter and because it is filled with mostly APBT or "staffie mixes" they never have any room at the inn. A lot of times dogs live there for YEARS.

so, what happens to the unwanted ones? Terrible neglect, often abandonmnet or the old Remington Special in the back lot and the dog is buried never to be seen again.

I agree.. don't get a pet unless you are going to be a responsible and caring owner. Typically those who come to this forum are. I don't know how to reach those who are not. I have tried but mostly it is like talking to a brick wall.
 

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I remember the day I had to put Silver down, because she had a tumor that had exploded internally and the vet said he could operate, but her quality life woulld have been a lot less and I told him that I doubt she really would of made it through surgery, so I came in to have her put down and the vet said to me that he had already put down 5 dog this week and it was only Wed 9:00am and this is the only dog that should of been put down! It was owners sick of their dogs.

I just spent 23 months battling my Tensing lymphoma and I would of never changed a thing and we almost thought we had it beat, but it just wasn't to be.
 

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I know this is a little off topic, I been feeding my puppy Iams, i dont know if that falls in the "crap dog food" category... if it does then what kind of food should i be feeding her?
Iams isn't the worst food you could be feeding, the worst would be foods like "Dog Food" "Sprout" and "Ol' Roy"

Iams in a lower quality food though, with lots of fillers (Fillers are things that just make your dog feel full but have no neutritional benifit, they also make your dog poop more)

A good dog food should have Meat products as the first 5 ingredients listed on the back, so things like beef, lamb, chicken, should be first. a wheat free diet is also best because dogs can't get any neutrients from wheat (it's another one of thoughs fillers)
 

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We do boarding, and a regular boarder came in. The owners complained that there 3-yr old lab/chow mix was tearing up the house and had a lot of energy. While the doctor is explaining training options and possibly medicating with prozac, the owner interrupts and says 'We'd like to put her down. It's too much.' Even with suggesting some foster homes and such, they were adamant on putting 3yr old Samantha down. I had to help bag her. The kicker? They didn't even want the ashes, leash, or collar.
That is absolutely awful! I hate seeing people get an animal without considering the long-term. Sometimes I think they should require licenses to have the privilege of owning animals!
 

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The last month a 90lb beagle boarded.
IMO, this is just outright abuse. Poor dog. And I'm sure they weren't JUST feeding them its dog food. I'm sure there were plenty of table scraps thrown in. (I don't have anything against feeding table scraps within reason. But obviously a 90 pound beagle should NOT be getting them.)
 

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IMO, this is just outright abuse. Poor dog. And I'm sure they weren't JUST feeding them its dog food. I'm sure there were plenty of table scraps thrown in. (I don't have anything against feeding table scraps within reason. But obviously a 90 pound beagle should NOT be getting them.)
Oh yeah, they had table scraps! The pitti boarding with the beagle was pretty heavy, too, but it was obvious that the beagle was the 'healthy eater' of the fam. Disgusting. The owners brought in treats to go along with their feeds, and they were like two huge bags of Canine Carryouts and stuff. They wanted the dogs to be fed 8 treats a day. We fed them two a day, and 'donated' the rest to the other dogs boarding for night-time treat snacks. I know some of you might chastise me for not going along with the owners wishes, but I'm NOT contributing to slowly killing a dog.
 

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For everyone out there who doesn't give a damn about their pets, there are folks like us who just spent $500.00 for surgery on an infected bite, on an 11 year old cat who was the loser in a fight with another cat, the first time in his life.

Before you get down on me for letting the cat be an outside cat; this particular cat wasn't the kind of cat that could be left inside, he was had too much Tom cat in him and we finally relented and let him have his outdoors and if he has a shorter life, it will have been a happier life.

Now, post-surgically and with 6 sutures, he is staying indoors and maybe he will stay inside now, but I wouldn't bet the house on it.
 
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