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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I've been lurking around reading for most of the past two years. My Finnlee is almost 2 years old he will be in September. My question is how do I give his reward when it is food because he's a low to the ground dog and I have issues with my stability. Not all his rewards are food. I do praise and play time too. Old photo but he's not much taller.

Thanks,
AJ & Finnlee
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Can't you toss them to him?
I have been but I've found its led to him focus on the ground instead of me and now he's got issues with trying to eat everything under his nose. He's still working on heel and leave it. I was just hoping someone might have some other ideas.
 

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It might not be practical for all-day, every-day applications, but for formal walks & training sessions you could carry a soft treat in a squeeze tube, which can be held down for him to get a lick of. ??
You can fill them with whatever soft food/treat your dog enjoys.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys for all your wonderful ideas. I'll try them slowly and see what works.

AJ & Finnlee
 

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Maybe use a clicker before you toss it?
Pretty much this. Alternatively, instead of a clicker you could substitute a marker word such as "good!" or "yes!".

'Where' the dog is focused at the time you use that word or clicker, is the important thing. Well, it's usually at least one of the criteria. Other criteria may be the dog's position (ie - heel / in line with your ankle or a particular part of a wheelchair) or the actual behaviour itself (ie - leave it / the exact moment of relinquishment).

Also, I would try using very thinly sliced chicken wieners as the reward. Freezing them before slicing will make them much easier to slice, at approximately the thickness of a dime or slightly less. Use of wieners (now thawed) will reduce the tendency of the treat to 'bounce' when it hits the ground, which will reduce the likelihood of the dog needing to sniff and search for it and potentially lose his focus on you. The treats will basically sort of 'stick' wherever you toss or drop them, which should aid in a faster focus recovery time, and aid in establishing precise positioning as well.
 
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