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Hello, this is my first post on this site so sorry if its awkward i dont know what I'm doing ... Anyways, I just adopted a 4mo old shepherd mix puppy almost a week ago. the day I picked her up she was fixed, and the vet advised that she stays inactive because of her stitches. I've noticed she's chewing up her bed in her crate, which I know is because she isnt tired enough and isnt getting enough exercise. How can I properly tire her out if I cant let her loose in my yard for her to run? I've thought about taking her for a walk but I don't know if its the best idea, considering she doesnt have all her puppy shots yet. I dont want to keep taking her cone off at night for the crate because it worries me (she's really good about not touching her stitches during the day though), but she also wont stay still on my bed or in my room. She's only calm in her crate because she knows its bedtime, however she does get up in the middle of the night to chew her toys or her bed. Help D:
 

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Look up enrichment ideas for dogs, puzzle toys, or nosework games. These are designed to engage your dog's brain and help them feel fulfilled and satisfied, but in most cases are very easy to do in small spaces and with low physical exertion. You can also try teaching low-activity tricks (a nose or paw target, for example, or putting a toy in a box, walking backwards on command, shake, play dead, etc), basically pick anything that seems fun and low-pressure as a way to work her brain and build your bond. Offering chew toys she loves or part of her meals stuffed in a food toy like a Kong Classic or Toppl is also a wonderful calming, stress-relieving activity - you can freeze food toys to make it more challenging if she empties them super fast. Mental stimulation can't replace physical exercise long-term, but it can work really well to make surgery recovery more bearable for both of you.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Look up enrichment ideas for dogs, puzzle toys, or nosework games. These are designed to engage your dog's brain and help them feel fulfilled and satisfied, but in most cases are very easy to do in small spaces and with low physical exertion. You can also try teaching low-activity tricks (a nose or paw target, for example, or putting a toy in a box, walking backwards on command, shake, play dead, etc), basically pick anything that seems fun and low-pressure as a way to work her brain and build your bond. Offering chew toys she loves or part of her meals stuffed in a food toy like a Kong Classic or Toppl is also a wonderful calming, stress-relieving activity - you can freeze food toys to make it more challenging if she empties them super fast. Mental stimulation can't replace physical exercise long-term, but it can work really well to make surgery recovery more bearable for both of you.
thank you! thats very helpful :)
 
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