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my poor aunt called me the other day and told me some bad news about her poodle, rusty. he is 10 years old and overweight by 10 lbs [he is a toy poodle..]
but thats not even the bad part.

the vet said he has two broken molars, and a handful of external tumors on his rear end, mostly by his anal glands. and he needs neutered [the vet suspects that has something to do with the tumors]. the estimated cost is upwards of 2k.

my aunt has very little money, but she acts like shes willing to go even further into debt to get all this done. and im on the other line wondering.. is there ever a scenario when you just gotta "give up"?

i mean, hes had a good life.. eating out, fathering two litters of puppies, and being a very spoiled dog. i know poodles tend to have very long life spans, but i figure if you add on how obese he is, hes getting close to retirement.

what would you do in this situation? if you think he should remain untreated until his condition worsens and he becomes unhappy or in pain and then be laid to rest, how would you go about telling a very distraught aunt?
 

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your aunt needs to make the decision after talking to the vet. It's a very personal decision. There is Carecredit, that is a line of credit for medical bills, if she wants to apply for it.

Personally I look at what the quality of life is, and what the prognosis is afterwards. On an old dog, I wouldn't spend a ton of money if the dog doesn't have a good prognosis. I'd keep him comfortable, and when that isn't possible I'd give him a kind euthanasia.
 

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A 10-year-old small-breed dog should have quite a few years left on him. I wouldn't mind putting the money into a dog in that situation if there was a good chance he'd go on to have a decent quality of life. Of course, if she doesn't start taking care of things like helping him get to a healthy weight, it won't do much good to fix what's wrong now. But she's the one who has to live with her decision and nobody else should yammer on about it.

ETA: I would, however, tell her to get price quotes from a few more vets. Some vets will take advantage of her affection for the dog, and some vets just plain charge too much. It never hurts to make sure you're paying a fair price.
 

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what would you do in this situation? if you think he should remain untreated until his condition worsens and he becomes unhappy or in pain and then be laid to rest said:
None of that except the obesity (which can be remedied by not over-feeding) sounds life threatening. My thought would be to apply for care credit with the vet. 2k is really not out of reason for a dental with several extractions, neutering and tumor removal. I feel that it is the owner's responsibility (within reason, and considering the factors) to take the best care possible of their dog.
 
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