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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all!

I'm a new member and a first time owner of 3 month old lab/gsd boy name Dodger.
This might sounds stupid, and frankly i never thought of how important a certain leash for our dog until i read posts regarding leash training.
what makes the difference between types of leashes??
For instance, a correction leash? a choke ones? or other types? Also, some people say that harness is better and some say not.
I know different dogs uses different leashes for different needs. Maybe you can tell me your ones and what made you pick that one.

Thank you!
 

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My lab wears a harness with a ring at her chest. It makes it harder for her to pull while we work on walking nicely. As far as a leash goes, I have a normal, 6 ft nylon one for walks around the neighbourhood/trips to the vet, etc. I also have a twenty ft one for hiking and general running around. Works really well.
 

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I also have a small breed and we have a regular nylon collar that we hook a leash onto when we're just popping out to potty. If we're going anywhere else (walks, park, class, pet store, etc...) he wears a harness and we use a non-retractable leash. He's just about grown out of his harness now, and we ordered a chest clip harness (easy walk) for him at the trainer's recommendation while we work on leash walking.
 

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I use a flat nylon quick-release buckle collar on Chester for normal walks; its 1 3/4 inch width to be easier on his throat. He also wears (outside of the house) a regular 3/4" nylon collar with his tags. For hiking, running on a long line, riding in the car (buckled in for safety) and supervised tie-out, he has a Ruffwear Webmaster harness. For high excitement situations, he has a prong training collar which is worn in addition to his collar with tags and attached to it with a small carabiner as a fail-safe (prongs can come unattached rarely but it happens).

The foster dog wears a martingale collar with tags all the time (she is a higher escape risk than Chester and less known by the neighbors) and for walks and car rides, wears a simple nylon harness (a basic one from Walgreens)

For leashes- both dogs have a 6 foot nylon leash with a traffic handle built in. I also have for various situations a 4 ft leash (for busy urban areas), 6 foot leashes without traffic handles, a 6 foot leash where the handle is also a buckle loop (can attach to belt for hands free or to a table or railing for a short tie-out etc), a 15 ft cotton training lead and a 50 ft nylon blaze orange leash for running around in fields/hiking in open areas or playing in unfenced yards.

I don't recommend choke collars and I dislike chain leads because 1)they are heavier and drag on the dog's neck and 2) you can't easily grip them at a shorter length for quick control. I don't know what you mean by "correction leash" but with a puppy, you want to be limiting or rarely using corrections of any sort anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you guys!

I know, that "correction leash" confuses me..that's why I started this thread. I just been using the regular nylon collar with a 4ft normal leash. I am interested for harness, maybe he would stop pulling on me :D
 

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Hi,
For a pup you need to be gentle with their necks and it's a great time to get them in the rythm of walking with you.

Correction Collars - are called this because you are meant to do sharp short corrections to snap them into attention and re-focus them on what you want - not to pinch, and not to choke. It's actually difficult to do this patiently and quickly.

What works best is a slip lead - normally a soft material that isn't heavy like the chains, and doesn't pinch like the pinch collars. However, best thing is for you to train yourself first - Dog whisperer is a low stress entertaining way to learn about dog training without getting off the couch ;)

Harnesses are the worst thing to walk a pup with because you are actually 'training' them to build up their chest muscles. They were originally created for working dogs, sled dogs and for pulling loads. In the case of the walk you end becoming their load, and you get pulled along. For strong dogs though put yourself in a cart and teach him to haul - it will exhaust them out.

When putting on your dog collar allow a finger space between the collar and the neck for pups and small dogs and two for larger dogs.

We have more on sizes and dog collar articles on our site if it helps: http://www.leroymadison.com.au

Have fun :) The investment you put into your pup now pays big smiles later in life.
Leroy madison
 
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