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Sorry, my brain is a bit scattered in this post.
I see this topic all the time in working/sporting dog groups, primarily people being very critical of dogs with lesser heat tolerance than others.

So what are the differences between a more heat/cold tolerant dog within the same breed?
Why are some Aussies (or any breed, just comparing two dogs of the same breed) good in the heat while others are not?
Two dogs of one breed can look relatively similar, same coat type, snout, nares, muscle mass/weight, yet they differ in weather tolerance.
Does this come down to physical traits we cannot see on the outside or is it more to do with a dogs mind?
Is it simply a matter of self regulation? If so, then why would some dogs need more breaks than others?

Again, I am comparing dogs in the same breed, not comparing like a Vizsla to a Bulldog because the physical differences are to great to ask such a question.
 

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Dog breeds may have been developed for specific purposes, but surely anyone who has had several individuals of one breed recognizes how much in-breed variety there can be. Gun shy hunting dogs. Herding dogs and livestock guardian dogs that savage what they're supposed to herd or guard. Dogs of supposedly sweet companion breeds that are nasty. Hyper-friendly dogs from supposedly reserved breeds. Extreme examples, but why shouldn't there be dogs from desert breeds that discover air conditioning and go - yesss!
 

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If I had to guess, I'd bet there's multiple factors that go into it, including both genetic and environmental ones. Some might have to do with care - eg two dogs might have the same coat type, but if one is getting a thorough blowout weekly during the hottest months and the other gets 1-2 a year, that'll make a difference. I also know that dogs, like people, can definitely acclimate better to high (or low) temperatures if they spend more time in that temperature range, so spending much of the day in air conditioning or a naturally cool place like a basement probably plays a factor in lower heat tolerance too. I imagine metabolism is the biggest genetic/physiological factor that's difficult to predict or measure and wouldn't be immediately obvious when looking at two dogs who seem very similar but have very different heat tolerances.

There's probably more subtle things going on as well, it's an interesting question! I'm not sure we even know all of the genetic/physiological factors that make some humans more or less heat tolerant, but it'd be nice if they figure it out. I'm miserable on both ends of the spectrum, haha!
 
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