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Which part isn't true? A breeder, even a responsible one, doesn't have to breed that litter. They don't have to bring more pups into the world.
Actually they do or eventually all we would have left are mutts. Nothing wrong with mutts but there would be no more bloodhounds for police work, no more labs for service dogs, no more GSD for protection. Not to say a mutt can't do these things but they are certainly not going to do it as well as the dogs that were bred for a specific task. Dogs as we know it wouldn't exist.
 

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Pai, perhaps you should actually read my posts. The first one says
The more shelters I visit, the more homeless animals I see, the more I feel that there is no such thing as a responsible dog breeder (just as I believe there's no such thing as a responsible cat breeder).
meaning that I've made up my mind about cat breeding, and I see dog breeding following the same route. To me, they're not very different issues. So I used the info you supplied point out why I feel as I do about the cat population.
When you're saying only shelter adoption is ethical and buying from a breeder is not, and then comparing it to adopting handicapped babies vs healthy babies, it sounds like you're saying people who don't want to adopt handicapped babies are being somehow selfish and comparing them to people who don't adopt shelter pets.
There's nothing in my posts about handicapped children :confused: It compared people having babies to people adopting babies. In my life I have found that some people have the same mindset in this situation as when they're deciding whether to buy or adopt a dog. I was not comparing the situations, I was comparing the mindset.
And yeah, I do think it's not ethical to buy a dog when there are many who need homes, not just in shelters either (craigslist, anyone?). But that's just my opinion. I'm not trying to force it on anyone, I'm merely stating what I believe.
But I think I've probably done enough talking on this thread, so I'm out :)
 

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meaning that I've made up my mind about cat breeding, and I see dog breeding following the same route. To me, they're not very different issues. So I used the info you supplied point out why I feel as I do about the cat population/
You ignored the many links that show that your perspective of reality is not accurate, and then cherry picked the only stat that vaguely sounds like it already agrees with your preconcieved notion. If you don't believe that facts are something you should take into account before you form an opinion about something and accuse people of being unethical, then of course further discussion is pointless.
 

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The answer to your question is Y E S.

As far as what none purebred dogs can or cannot do in comparison to mixed breeds I would point out the many exceptions to possibilities . As far as health screenings there should be no exceptions in my opinion..

As far as being ethical possibly we should all simply rid ourselfs as parisites to this planet.
 

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Why did you need/want a purebred "Coton de Tulear"? That's quite and uncommon choice. You may have legitimate reasons but in general I find it disappointing when people think they must have the perfect, most unique purebred dog bred for them while there are so many dogs currently up for adoption.

Do you care to explain this? I just find it odd that you came on here, had access to all the good advice on this forum, and then chose to ignore it and do what you wanted to anyway.
I had the same reaction. It's not like you're buying a new pair of sneakers. A dog is a major, long-term commitment.
 

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Most animals end up in shelters because of owners not being able / or wanting to care for them anymore[/URL], not because 'too many animals are being bred'. The average age of an animal sent to a shelter is 1-2 years old, not newborns that nobody wanted.
Dogs, yes. But shelters are FULL of kittens from accidental and not-so-accidental (what? You didn't know how hard it is to place kittens, so you wanted to have a litter because kittens are so cute?) litters. There are WAY too many cats being bred, purposely and otherwise. I think that there probably aren't too many dogs being bred, just too many dog owners not being responsible enough.

BTW, I think if people had to buy those pups DIRECTLY from the puppy mills (instead of those mall pet stores) those mills would go out of business pretty quickly. They are not pretty or happy places.
Almost all the local puppymills sell direct to the public (don't have to have USDA certification that way). They're pretty good at prettying up the visible parts of the "puppy farm" and keeping the not-so-pretty parts out of sight in a pole barn. So I don't know if that would work. Most people don't ask what's inside the barn.
 

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A breeder, even a responsible one, doesn't have to breed that litter. They don't have to bring more pups into the world.
Tell that to a breeder who's been refining her lineage for years. Are you suggesting that thousands of carefully-honed bloodlines suddenly be put to a complete halt until shelters run out of dogs?
 

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As many of you know, I d rescue and I am all about adopting from shelters and rescues. In fact, I think shelter/ rescue dogs are the best in the world and most any breed can be found in a shelter or rescue breed.

With that being said, my Bella came from a BYB, well an oops litter. After suffering a tragic loss of a rescue dog my hubby wanted to get me a standard poodle (the dog of my dreams) and he wanted it to be a puppy that was mine to raise the way I wanted. So after being in contact with local "responsible breeders" who wanted between $1800 and $2000 dollars for one with limited registration I decided, very broken hearted, not to get one. It was just too much money, not that I couldn't afford to do it, I just wasn't willing to pay that much and someone tell me what I could and couldn't do with my dog. So, I waited.

To make a long story short, we were in Tampa and I decided to look in their local pets section of the paper and called a few breeders down there nd found an oops litter that was AKC registered, already been to basic training and vet certified for $800. I went and met with the lady, fell in love with a puppy and brought my sweet Bella home the same day. Turns out that she has an excellent pedigree that was as good as the high dollar puppies we found here. The lady I got her from had her female spayed after this litter was born (which was the only litter her 4 year old bitch ever had) and I couldn't be more pleased with the dog I got.

Did I help add to the over population of dogs? Yep, I did. But the fact of the matter is, the puppies were already born, I wanted one and these were affordable. I understand that many of you have no problem paying $2000 for a puppy but there are a lot of responsible pet owners that can not afford to do that. Does that make us bad people? I don't think so, I have used the money that I saved to spoil my Bella rotten and I couldn't love her more if I would have paid $10,000 for her!

I will say this though, I did go to several BYB's that were selling Standards for a cheap penny that I refused to buy from because I knew when I pulled up that they were, witout a dought, BYB's. Bella truely did come from an oops litter, there were 10 pups in her litter and the lady was selling them cheap because she had too many faces to feed. And although I added to the problem of over population, I was SO LUCKY to find Bella. She was born just for me!!
 
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