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My fiancé and I adopted a six month old puppy about a month and a half ago. We have a 2 1/2 year old pointer/boxer mix who is great. The place we adopted from told us the dog is potty trained, complete lie. His name is Leo. In the short time we’ve had the dog he has peed easily 40 times inside possibly more. Some days he would pee 5-6 times inside. This is all happening not too long after he had just been outside. He’s peed on the bed 3-4 times, in the kitchen...I can’t even count anymore how many times, in the basement many times, carpets upstairs, and downstairs. He was neutered almost a week ago. We described this to our vet and she has a hunch it is diabetes and wants a urine sample. The first two days after being neutered he didn’t pee at all but he is now back to doing it. Tonight, within an hour Leo peed in the basement twice even after being out once or twice in that hour. Does anyone have experience with dogs having diabetes or costs to help a dog with this problem? I don’t want to get rid of him he’s a great suit for our other dog but it’s becoming almost unbearable at this point and I absolutely love dogs and am very patient. Thank you!
 

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what are you doing for potty training?
The same thing we did for our other dog. When the dog pees we take them outside immediately, to try and sit by the door when you need to go, using treats when they go outside etc.
 

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Excuse me, I'm curious if the dog lifts his leg when he pees, or if the urine just leaks out. Does he seem to be able to control when pee comes out?

Does his face/body language change in clear stages, like: "I am going to pee. I'm peeing now. I'm done peeing now." Or does his face/body language seem sort of oblivious or powerless to what's happening or uncomfortable that he has peed indoors?
 

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The same thing we did for our other dog. When the dog pees we take them outside immediately, ...
Whoa. Thinking back, that's how we did potty training 50 years ago - let them make the mistake, punish, and take outside.

Today, most people use the kinder and better way that requires a lot less cleanup. Take the dog out regularly BEFORE it makes the mistake and reward for proper outside elimination.

I'd have the vet workup. If there's a urinary tract infection (treated with antibiotics, make sure vet uses one suitable for THAT infection and for a long enough time, not just one week), give proper treatment. If diabetes, I understand it can be treated in dogs much like in people. Only you can decide if you're willing to do that.

If no physical problems, or after they're under control, start training the way you would a small puppy. There's no reason to let him relieve himself from one end of the house to the next. Confine when you can't watch every minute - crate, exercise pen, gate across small room. Get him out regularly. Start with every hour, immediately after waking, immediately after eating or drinking. Up the time between outings gradually.

Don't make the mistake of taking him out and then right back in the minute he relieves himself. Most dogs figure that out pretty quick and because they want to stay outside either delay going, try to hold it (which is why you get the inside accident after the walk), or only go partially. Give the treat, then also reward with a little sniff around and playtime.
 

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Whoa. Thinking back, that's how we did potty training 50 years ago - let them make the mistake, punish, and take outside.

Today, most people use the kinder and better way that requires a lot less cleanup. Take the dog out regularly BEFORE it makes the mistake and reward for proper outside elimination.

I'd have the vet workup. If there's a urinary tract infection (treated with antibiotics, make sure vet uses one suitable for THAT infection and for a long enough time, not just one week), give proper treatment. If diabetes, I understand it can be treated in dogs much like in people. Only you can decide if you're willing to do that.

If no physical problems, or after they're under control, start training the way you would a small puppy. There's no reason to let him relieve himself from one end of the house to the next. Confine when you can't watch every minute - crate, exercise pen, gate across small room. Get him out regularly. Start with every hour, immediately after waking, immediately after eating or drinking. Up the time between outings gradually.

Don't make the mistake of taking him out and then right back in the minute he relieves himself. Most dogs figure that out pretty quick and because they want to stay outside either delay going, try to hold it (which is why you get the inside accident after the walk), or only go partially. Give the treat, then also reward with a little sniff around and playtime.
We don’t do anything mean to Leo when he goes we take. Like I said we take him out if he pees inside so he knows where to go and we take him out Constantly because this problem. I’m not sure where you got any sort of mistreatment from. We also have a fenced in yard that the dogs play in constantly. Our first dog we trained the same and with no mistreatment and she has no problems. When he goes he doesn’t lift his leg he kind of squats and when you see him he will walk while doing it. We crate him if we leave for a little.
 

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Hmm, squatting to pee sounds like a normal option, but peeing while walking doesn't sound like a normal behavior to me personally. The point I'm thinking about is that if he is physically incontinent (which can happen for a variety of reasons), then it is not his fault if he does not respond to potty training, and no amount of any training will resolve incontinence, if that indeed is the root issue. Various other possible remedies would be in order.

Sorry, I don't know anything about dog diabetes. Is it even likely that such a young dog would have diabetes?
 

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I’m not sure where you got any sort of mistreatment from.
I didn't. I said that's the way we potty trained years ago. It probably worked better and faster with negative consequences than without, but even so, I don't think it's the best or even a good way. Dogs don't generally do well in connecting something they've already done with what's happening now. You didn't say you scoop him up and rush him outside mid-pee, but afterwards, which gives him enough time to disconnect his action and yours as cause and effect.

You know that saying about not continuing doing something that isn't working and expecting different results?

I agree with Doglight. For a 6-month male to pee squatting isn't unusual. Going while moving is. I'd get the diagnostic vet work and go from there.
 

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Just a little update on Leo if anyone is still interested. We took him to the vet so they could see if they can find anything wrong. Leo bit the vet a little, jumped at her assistant, and nipped my fiancé on her chin. The vet right away said take him away and take him back. She said there was no medication she had thag could help him. She called the place we adopted him from but they weren’t around or busy. The vet also said she has a lawyer if she needed to be involved with the adoption agency. I’m not sure what to do. My fiancé wants to get rid of him but I don’t want to give up on him.
 

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Oh brother, what a lame and manipulative cop out. If she wants him out of her office, that's fine, but what an ass to say that.

Sorry this is happening. If I may ask, what does Leo eat?
we feed him the same thing we feed our other dog. It’s Americanjourney and we’ve had no issues with their poop or our other dog at all. We talked to the rescue and they said he wasn’t evaluated or didn’t have the few weeks of training all their other dogs go through until they’re ready to be adopted.
 

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Oh brother, what a lame and manipulative cop out. If she wants him out of her office, that's fine, but what an ass to say that.

Sorry this is happening. If I may ask, what does Leo eat?
I’ve been willing to try my best to work with Leo and talk to my fiancé about giving him more time. I really like him and want to help I’d hate to see anything bad happen to him.
 

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Be aware. Some dogs take a long time to potty train. Expecting the dog to be potty trained after a few weeks is naïve at best.

Look up a few videos or books on the subject. Zak George has many vids on YouTube for training dogs, as a suggestion. There are many resources to access.
 

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Be aware. Some dogs take a long time to potty train. Expecting the dog to be potty trained after a few weeks is naïve at best.

Look up a few videos or books on the subject. Zak George has many vids on YouTube for training dogs, as a suggestion. There are many resources to access.
Thank you! He’s slowly getting better with peeing. He has some other behavioral issues I’m going to get worked out with a trainer shortly.
 
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