Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
342 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
DHPP stands for Distemper, hepatitis, parvo and parainfluenza. Adult dogs usually also have a leptospirosis vaccine included.
The vaccine comes in a vial as a dry mix. Right before injection, it is mixed with sterile diluent to become a liquid. It is pink in color. In small dogs, our clinic usually recommends giving some type of glucose, because this injection tends to lower blood sugar and small dogs tend to have more reaction because of thier size. The same dose is given no matter the dogs body weight.

The following information comes from the AVMA (American Veterinary Medicine Association).
Canine distemper is the greatest single threat to the world's canine population. It occurs wherever there are dogs. Among puppies, the death rate from Canine Distemper often reaches 80%. The disease also strikes older dogs, although much less frequently. Even if a dog does not die, it can be permanently impaired, due to irreparable damage to the nervous system, the sense of smell hearing or sight. Partial or total paralysis is not uncommon, and other opportunistic diseases, such as pneumonia frequently strike dogs weakened by a distemper infection.
Canine Distemper is HIGHLY CONTAGIOUS and is caused by a virus.
It is usually transmitted through contact with respiratory secretions, (similar to the way we humans catch colds!). Contact with urine and feces of an infected dog may also transmit infection.
SYMPTOMS fever, "stuffed up" head. or severe cold symptoms. Early signs include squinting, eye congestion and a pus like discharge from the eye. Weight loss, coughing, vomiting, nasal discharge and diarrhea. Later symptoms may include paralysis, seizures, or twitching. Dogs are listless and have poor appetites. Occassionally, the virus causes rapid growth of the tough keratin cells on the footpad, resulting in a hardened pad.
DIstemper is so prevalent and the signs are so varied that and sick dog should be seen by a veterinarian immediately for a difinitive diagnosis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,761 Posts
Elsa just went in last week for Rabbies and Distemper. My vet does Rabbies every 3 years, and distemper yearly. Are these frequencies in line with the vet you work with? I know there's much debate on how often our pups should be vaccinated but I do trust my vet. I have to check to see if it was DHPP she got, or is there a distemper only shot?...it was pink in color as you mentioned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
342 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
There has been quite a bit of debate in the veterinary world about the need for annual boosters for DHPP, lyme, bordatella (kennel Cough). In my own very unscientific and humble opinion, once a dog reaches 9-10+ years I wouldn't (and havent) had yearly boosters, but went every two years. I personally believe the antibodies build up over time. If you want to, a vet can perform a titer test to see how much antibody is there in the dog. The problem with this is that the titer is expensive (sometimes double the cost or more of the vx) so it is reasonable to go ahead and vaccinate. DHPP is boosted annually. Rabies is given the first time for one year, then is boosted every three thereafter, unless the locality stipulates otherwise. I am sure she got the DHPP, it is an all in one vaccination, but at her age, they probably left out the lepto.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,224 Posts
Very informative post.

My vet does the DHPP and the rabies every 3yrs. Although, some of the area vet still do the DHPP annually. I only get Bordetella when necessary (for canine social group, training classes).

And a question....
Is the standard for Bordatella every 6 months usually? My bill states that Natalie will need it again in 6 months so I am just curious.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top