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Here's a PDF of the text that was in the video for those that found the video difficult to follow.

Since I just started training Basil a new trick today I'll use that as an example for the steps described in the video:

1. Define the behavior you want the learner to do; this is the target behavior:
The behavior is picking up a basket in his mouth and being able to carry it around with an object in it on cue. Also, keep holding onto the basket until a cue is given to drop it.

2. Split the target behavior into smaller steps to shape:
Started out marking and rewarding for sniffing the basket handle, then mouthing the basket handle, then biting the handle with more pressure, then biting onto the handle and moving it slightly, then biting onto the basket and taking a step, then taking more than one step. Future steps we'll take are: Biting into the handle and carrying it for longer and longer durations without dropping it, and being able to carry the basket with an object of increasing weight inside of it.

3. Create a supportive environment before the behavior occurs:
Not totally sure I understand what this means, but we're starting out in the living room: a quiet, familiar, low-distraction area. After the trick is solid in the living room, we'll up the criteria and practice in increasingly distracting settings, for instance, the living room with a lot of commotion going on, then we'll train outside in front of my apartment on a calm day, then outside by the parking lot where there are cars driving by and people in the distance, then near strangers in closer proximity like the hardware store, then someplace where there are dogs to distract him like the pet store. This way Basil will eventually be able to perform the trick anywhere.

Also, I'm using shaping to train him this trick so I'm not giving him any cues or prompting yet. I just wait for him to do what I want and I reward him when he does. After he's doing it consistently I'll attach a cue word.

4. Identify long-term reinforcers, i.e., the naturally occurring benefits of this behavior for the learner:
I don't think I know what would count as a long-term reinforcer for this trick? It's not like it really benefits him past the treats and praise I'm giving him. And I would like to phase out the treats and increase the length of time he carries the basket around before I praise him. So I'm not sure how to answer this.

5. Identify short-term "jump-start" (contrived) reinforcers for teaching this behavior:
The short-term reinforcers I'm using are food rewards. Which Basil is definitely motivated by, lol.
 

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Using the example of shaping Wally to get on his scale:

1. Define the behavior you want the learner to do; this is the target behavior:

[I want him to get on the scale, sit down, and remain there until signaled otherwise.]

2. Split the target behavior into smaller steps to shape:


Walk to scale
Sniff (or nose-touch) scale
Paw scale with a front paw
Paw scale with other front paw
Put and keep one front paw on scale
Put and keep other front paw on scale
Put and keep both front paws on scale
Put back paws on scale
Sit on scale
Sit-stay on scale until released
Repeat 1 to 10 when scale is presented on floor (dog is to perform 1 to 10 on his own with no prompting from me)
Repeat 1 to 11 until behavior is consistent and predictable


3. Create a supportive environment before the behavior occurs:

[We began work in a familiar location where the scale was an obvious object in his vision to interact with.]

4. Identify long-term reinforcers, i.e., the naturally occurring benefits of this behavior for the learner:

[Other than the opportunity to earn a reward? I mean, it's not like sitting on a scale is innately beneficial to a dog from the dog's point of view, other than the overall history of offering behaviors having a chance to trigger food getting in his mouth]

5. Identify short-term "jump-start" (contrived) reinforcers for teaching this behavior:

[Reward marker and treats. Though...would food count as a "contrived" reinforcer? I mean, eating is something Wally ALWAYS likes to do. I don't have to make food rewarding, he's a natural foodie. These can (and have largely been) faded. Still not sure if there's anything innately pleasurable for him about sitting on that scale...]
 

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imma go with cats...just to be contrary. it's really the same thing though.

1. Define the behavior you want the learner to do; this is the target behavior:
give me a back massage.

2. Split the target behavior into smaller steps to shape:
1. get on my back when i lay down
2. "make biscuits" on cue
3. combine 1 and 2

3. Create a supportive environment before the behavior occurs:
she usually "makes biscuits" on my stomach after she's played out with the RC mouse and stuffed her face. ive just been making yummy treats and the RC mouse available more often...to "get her in the mood". this step is mostly that..noting tendancies and preferences and playing on those.

4. Identify long-term reinforcers, i.e., the naturally occurring benefits of this behavior for the learner:
certain things i do, if i react to the things she does with those behaviors of mine...she becomes much more responsive and malleable. this step is kind of an extension of the last step except instead of noting preceeding tendancies and preferences...you pay more attention to what happens after a behavior.

5. Identify short-term "jump-start" (contrived) reinforcers for teaching this behavior:
the slicker brush. it's her LOVE. she will whore for it. lol.
 
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