Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everyone,

I'm really excited about this forum! I'm here because of an urgent, pressing problem I have with my reactive-aggressive dog. I need to move by the end of the month and found a beautiful apartment right by campus that is dog friendly. In fact, it's the only dog-friendly place I've found in the area. Unfortunately, the property owners require that I bring my dog to their office so they can "confirm the dog does not look or act aggressive."

When triggered, my dog both looks an acts aggressive. Triggers include, but are not limited to: prolonged eye contact (worst thing), men, strangers approaching her, strangers trying to pet her, strangers talking to her, and being on leash. When triggered, she barks (loudly), charges, and will bite if given the opportunity. (By biting I mean nipping up to this point, which I don't doubt could easily turn into serious bites.) I'm quite certain her reactivity is fear-based.

So my question, and this may be unethical but I'm desperate, is: What kind of medication should I request from my vet to chill my dog out long enough to pass as friendly in a highly triggering environment?

(Yes, I know this is being dishonest, and that is wrong, but the alternative - not having a place to live, or having to give my dog up - is far worse.)

Also in case you are wondering, I have done a TON of training with her, having most success with BAT training in which she gives calming signals and is rewarded by getting to walk away from the trigger. We have made a lot of progress, but for obvious reasons, this tactic won't work in the given situation.

She got acepromazine at the vet recently after surgery, which made her appear at normal-dog level (i.e. stoned out of her mind), but I read dogs can bite unexpectedly on ace because their arousal is just as high, but they are less aware of their environment. I also read that benzos can be effective, unless the dog is more prone to biting due to reduced inhibition. :/

My plan: (1) Half breakfast, (2) Long blissful hike full of squirrels and chipmunks, (3) Medication, (4) Treat pouch full of hot dogs and cheese, (5) Enter room of death.

Advice hugely appreciated!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,911 Posts
I think you need to be really honest with the property owners and not drug your dog in order to pass their behavior test. Tell them that she's from a bit of a rough background, that she's fearful of certain things and that you're working on that with her. Explain your training methods, make them understand that you're a devoted and hard working dog owner of a non-perfect dog.

If they allow dogs on the property, they are dog-loving people. I think they will understand, as long as she doesn't fly into the room and attempt to bite them.

Lying to them is a huge cause for concern. If your dog reacts and bites someone on the property, YOU could get sued and THEY could get sued.

Does she behave better with strangers when she is off leash, or will she charge and nip if you can't hold her back?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,145 Posts
I think you're better off explaining your dog has certain triggers and how you are managing and training her rather than trying to drug her up. Starting off a relationship with your landlord dishonestly is bound to end badly. What happens when your neighbors start to report reactive behavior? I think you're really just pushing the problem into the future rather than getting rid of it altogether. (And if you go to your veterinarian asking for specific drugs you may come off as a drug-seeker and not get a prescription anyway.)
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top