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thank you for letting us be part of this forum. While we have helped train thousands of dogs on housebreaking issues, I am the first to admit I know little else about how to proceed sometimes on other issues. My Kippers is now 14 years old. She has multiple Lipoma around her body, some large enough to look uncomfortable, but my vet says I should not do anything about them. When do you make the decisions to put a 14 year old dog through testing and possible surgery?
A friend suggested that I adopt a puppy to get me through this tough time and thought of losing Kippers. My vet said a puppy would cause Kippers stress and add to her demise. Kippers walks 2 miles a day with me still, so she is not really feeble, just ..well, getting old.
Does anyone have thoughts on bringing a puppy into a home with an older dog? Someone suggested adopting a middle aged dog, is this a better option?
 

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I personally probably wouldn't add another dog if my dog seemed to be in her final stages, but I'm not living in your situation and don't know your dog.
We have a chocolate lab at the farm who is 14 years old and we're trying to make her life as stress free as possible, my parents want to add another puppy to the mix but are waiting. She has tumours, but the vet also advises against their removal at her age (and their location) and we agree.

Though how far you're willing to go is all up to you. We just weighed the pros and cons of putting her through testing and surgery and found that it wasn't worth it to put her through it. We're more so trying to make her as comfortable as we can until she's ready to go. She's still energetic and loves going for walks and has her vision, hearing and mobility so she still has time and memories to make with us!
 

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I think this all depends on the dogs involved. If Kippers LOVES the company of other dogs, I would consider adopting/purchasing a new companion, but I think a puppy might be a bit much (unless the dog loves puppy). I would go for an adult in that case.

At any rate, I would think about what would make Kippers happy. Would he be happy sharing you with other dogs? Just think about how much work/time you will need to invest in when you adopt your second dog.
 

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Yeah I tend to agree. I'm all for a second dog to ease the inevitable transition, but I think more mid-life is the time for that, or at least when you have several more years left with your pup. Doing it so late in the game just seems like it would cause more stress and not enough time to truly become fur-companions.
 

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I was given great advice by the Vet when our first dog was diagnosed with cancer - bring your dog home and love her for the remaining time you have with her - which is what we did. It is hard on us (this is true of all deaths of close ones!) but I see no reason to make your current dog have to deal with a second dog. When our Beagle died we waited for a long time before we got Maggie, we were starting our family. When Maggie died I couldn't stand the quietness of the house without a dog and we adopted Zoey about 2 months later but by then our children were grown.

My advice is enjoy the remaining time with the dog you have, when the time comes go through the grieving process (however long that is) and give another dog a good home. If you are up to 2 dogs then add another one eventually.
 

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I wouldn't get another dog, it really is hard on them. I got 5 year old Ginger when Max was 13 years old and they were okay but never best buddies. He adored going to the dog park and visiting small dogs but didn't need one in his home to be happy. He was going deaf and developing cancer and eyelid growths bothered him and his gut was going bad, having a younger dog that needed to be loose leash trained and barked all the time was hard for him to deal with.

At least get her blood tested. There are some organ failures that can be detected through blood work and if you know sooner then you might not have a crisis where you have to decide to spend thousands to pull the dog through, just a slow decline as the issue is treated properly. Before a kidney crisis or pancreatic crisis the dog is in agony, better to know the issue is there and treat it so dog isn't suffering.

Both Sassy and Max had surgery at 13.5 years old to remove eyelid growths. The growths were extremely painful so it was either remove them or kill the dog. I did have a huge lipoma removed from Sassy's ribcage at that time and she did move easier after that but agree, I probably wouldn't put a dog under just to remove something like that at that age.
 
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