Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I’ll start with a little background. My first dog was a rescue pit mix with complex behavior issues, I sadly lost him to lymphoma at 4 in 2014. Just before I lost my pit, I found the best chihuahua in the world on CL, we lost him at 11 years old this past month. At the end of 2014, I bought the most lovely GSD he was a dream. When my ex and I split he took the GSD and I kept the chihuahua. I still morn my GSD to this day (even though he really is living his best life with my ex).

I’m highly involved with my dogs. We’ve non-competitively done agility, obedience, I was KPA certified with my first dog, we’ve done some nose work, even tried Dock diving, rally, barn hunt. So Im looking for a dog that’s ready to work but can also settle in a household.

This will be my husbands first large dog, that’s why it’s between a golden and lab. To me the biggest difference between the golden and lab is their fur type. Other than that they feel very similar. I’ve even considered an Aussie as well, but I hesitate there because as I said, I’m looking for easy to ease my husband into large dogs.

Does anyone have any thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,428 Posts
As an FYI, Labradors shed like absolute fiends. Goldens as a breed are prone to allergies and cancer. In both breeds, the field/working lines tend to be lighter boned with a much more intense personality, while the show lines tend to be heavier boned and more mellow personality (those are sweeping generalizations, and dogs are individuals).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yea, as I said, I previously had a GSD so I completely understand shedding.

I was 100% Golden for a long while, my hesitation is that I’ve always considered both breeds kind of boring. I like a bit of personality and spunk. But I also need a dog with a solid temperament that will be good with cats and kids (and basically all ppl)...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,680 Posts
If it makes you feel better, neither breed is boring as puppies/adolescents :D They're notorious land sharks as babies.

Honestly, I think it's six of one, half a dozen of the other - either would fit your requirements. Just down to personal preference. In my experience Goldens tend to have a little more personality and to be more sensitive, whereas Labs tend to be more stolid and bomb-proof. I personally like the look of a Golden more, but I'd be super picky about choosing a breeder who's emphasizing longevity and soundness, given how common heritable issues are in the breed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Yea, as I said, I previously had a GSD so I completely understand shedding.

I was 100% Golden for a long while, my hesitation is that I’ve always considered both breeds kind of boring. I like a bit of personality and spunk. But I also need a dog with a solid temperament that will be good with cats and kids (and basically all ppl)...
Have you considered a flat-coated retriever?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Have you considered a flat-coated retriever?
I actually haven’t. Thank you so much for the suggestion. In my mind the Aussie and the border collie are still on the short list if I can find the right breeder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
@Lafluh43 I have a Golden and have had Labs as well. I don't really see major differences in them. Labs shed a lot and it is all the time. My golden only sheds everywhere if I don't brush him. They both have excellent prey drive, ambition to learn, also they love to please you. I have trained my Golden in a little bit of everything. I am wanting to really hone in on specific training areas such as nosework, personal protection. etc. I have him trained in retrieving water fowl. All in all they are both great dogs, and they are easy to train. Labs can be heavier than a golden. Labs can be thin or big boned, you won't be able to tell until they are older. Goldens are slimmer dogs and can weigh less. Goldens can be prone to cancer. I haven't had any health problems with my Golden boy yet. Another thing to consider, Labs and Goldens are not called Land Sharks for no reason. They will destroy anything and everything. They are heavy chewers. My Golden chewed some yearling trees in half. Chewed on chairs if I wasn't watching him closely. You will definitely have to puppy proof your home and provide plenty of chew toys. My Golden also loved the toilet paper lol! I think it just comes down to preference in all honesty. Hope this helps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
@Lafluh43 I have a Golden and have had Labs as well. I don't really see major differences in them. Labs shed a lot and it is all the time. My golden only sheds everywhere if I don't brush him. They both have excellent prey drive, ambition to learn, also they love to please you. I have trained my Golden in a little bit of everything. I am wanting to really hone in on specific training areas such as nosework, personal protection. etc. I have him trained in retrieving water fowl. All in all they are both great dogs, and they are easy to train. Labs can be heavier than a golden. Labs can be thin or big boned, you won't be able to tell until they are older. Goldens are slimmer dogs and can weigh less. Goldens can be prone to cancer. I haven't had any health problems with my Golden boy yet. Another thing to consider, Labs and Goldens are not called Land Sharks for no reason. They will destroy anything and everything. They are heavy chewers. My Golden chewed some yearling trees in half. Chewed on chairs if I wasn't watching him closely. You will definitely have to puppy proof your home and provide plenty of chew toys. My Golden also loved the toilet paper lol! I think it just comes down to preference in all honesty. Hope this helps!
Thank you so much! Yes it really does help!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,909 Posts
Sports-bred goldens are much more common than sports-bred labs in the agility scene, I do know that. But the sports-bred lines (in both breeds, I've known some hunting labs personally) are also very intense and might not be the 'easy' introduction you're looking for for your husband, haha. Though even outside sporting lines, labs and goldens are slow maturing dogs, and are often said to be puppies or adolescents until they're three or more, and can be little firecrackers during that time. They're often super solid and lovely dogs as adults, veritable social butterflies with both other dogs and people, but getting them there can be a challenge.

We had a young golden in our last adolescent/young adult class who was a gorgeous dog - I was a little bit in love even though I'm so not a golden person - but he had his owners at the end of their ropes because he struggled so much with arousal and getting amped up over everything in his environment (on top of being, well, a big, strong boy). Much improved by the end of class, but still, no breed guarantees easy to live with.

Have you considered attending shows and sporting events or even 'meet the breed' events (when it's safe to do so, of course!) to let your husband meet different breeds and talk to their owners? I'm also someone who doesn't find labs and goldens to be my 'thing', and the risk of going this route is that you find out that neither you nor your husband really 'click' with the breed you choose, which is sad for everyone involved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
@DaySleepers I 100% agree with what you are saying. We have one golden in our neighborhood and the husband likes him but is still hesitant. I think he had a bad experience with a large dog in the past. I feel like raising a dog from a puppy will help with the easing in. And you are also right that I’m prepared for the puppy stage, he may not be (you can talk about it endlessly but you don’t really know until you’re in it)

All that to say, I am looking at show lines/bench lines rather than field lines, to hopefully stack the deck in our favor. But this dog may end up being more “mine”, if you will, and because of that, I may just get a breed that intrigues me more (I’ve had a list since I was 14) rather than just pick the easy dog for him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,428 Posts
Looking for show lines is probably a good idea. I have a friend with working bred Labradors. Working as in for her older girls, their dam is a FEMA certified live find dog, the sire of the older bitch is a working detection dog and the younger bitch's sire is a titled field dog, and the baby puppy's sire and dam are are also SAR dogs. Her dogs are intense. She is a nosework instructor, and got working/field line dogs specifically for the sport. Other puppies from her older girls' litters are working SAR and detection dogs, and her puppy's littermates have all gone to serious working/sport homes.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lad20050620
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top