Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m having some anxiety. I bred these two together thinking without eye color problems or pigmentation problems it would be ok.
The mom are the first three pics and the dad is the next two. My dogs parents pics and her grandmothers and fathers pic from her mothers side

anyone that would like to NICELY!!!!! help me out? I didn’t breed for color, I was just trying to produce a good colored dog with nice conformation and an affinity for hunting. I’ve been attacked so many times I try to ask for help. Any experts out there please? I feel like the pups will be ok but I’d like some advice. Thank you for your kindness
264798
264799
264800
264801
264802
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,624 Posts
Dapple dachshunds should never be bred to one another. It is not safe for a dog to inherit two copies of the merle gene. The pups are at high risk of partial or complete blindness and deafness, as well as missing or malformed eyes and ears. Even those that do have their eyes and ears intact at birth and possess sight and/or hearing can lose it as they grow up, and they are very prone to glaucoma and cataracts.

I believe that the major dog clubs will not register the offspring of two dapple dachshunds.

I would discuss this with a vet immediately - you need real medical advice at this point, not rando internet people advice. Terminating the pregnancy should be an option that's on the table especially if it's early days.

This is is not a wait-and-see matter - if both parents are dapple, you can end up with an entire litter of puppies that all are deaf, blind, or deaf-blind, and may also have physical malformations. If you can't or won't terminate the pregnancy, you need a plan in place before birth for how to ensure these high-need dogs are cared for after they're born.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,640 Posts
Unfortunately, it doesn't matter how much pigment the parents have. If a puppy inherits two copies of the merle gene (called dapple in dachshunds, but it's the same gene), it can and will prevent a certain amount of pigment cells from developing properly, and if cells related to eye and inner ear development are affected, this can and will damage their vision and hearing.

Every puppy has a one-in-four chance of inheriting two copies of the merle gene. While this may mean exactly 1/4 of the litter is a double dapple, it's possible that all will be, or none. It's impossible to know until they're born, and even then some might need genetic testing to confirm. Not every double-dapple has vision or hearing problems, but the risk is very high, and I would encourage you to get any puppies with a large amount of white coloring vision and hearing tested before you place them in homes, especially if you plan to ask for a price equivalent to other breeders. Of course, any puppies with impairments should not be going for full price, and everything needs to be disclosed to the new owners, even if their deficits are relatively minor. Even at a discount, these puppies may be difficult to place in homes that have experience with special needs dogs, and therefore have a higher than average risk of winding up in the shelter system due to owners not being prepared for the challenges they present. The responsible thing would be to make sure your puppy homes know you will take back any puppy any time and rehome them yourself so they don't have to suffer this fate.

And yes, this litter might not be registerable in the reputable kennel clubs, which means if you plan to breed the offspring, even if they're not double dapple, they will not be 'papered'.

If I were in your situation, terminating the pregnancy is something I'd consider discussing with my vet, and seriously consider if it's safe and possible. I'd also be considering whether I have the ability to keep any puppies born with impairments for longer - possibly much longer - than the typical eight weeks in case I can't find them all homes with the dedication and resources to work with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Great looking dogs, i wouldn't worry too much about papers. In my experience only a small minority give a hoot about papers. i myself is planning to possibly stud my dog out and even though its a so-called "akc registratable", i want nothing to do with papers. I could print out blue ribbons, certs and diplomas all day on my hp inkjet printer. Bottom line, true dog lovers don't need no stinkin' papers. Good luck with whatever you decide... 🥇
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
Most merle (dapple in Dachshunds, harlequin in Beauceron) in dogs dogs is a simple inheritance. Since merle is dominant, only one copy of M is needed for a dog to be merle, so an Mm dog will be merle, and an mm dog won't be. As pointed out though, there are some pretty significant problems when a dog is MM, aka "double merle" or "double dapple". And the odds of breeding an Mm dog to another Mm dog results in a statistical outcome of 1/4 MM offspring. However, dogs don't read the book. You could wind up with a litter of half a dozen puppies, all of whom are MM and who are blind and/or deaf, or worse.

Bob, registration papers might not be the be-all and end-all of dog breeding, but a good grasp of genetics is crucial. Producing puppies with no further thought than "boy dog + girl dog = puppies to sell" is just plain old irresponsible, and a disservice to the puppies you produce and the people who wind up owning them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I’m not worried about papers. I just don’t want to possibly cause harm to any of the offspring. I think it will be ok because I have done it before. But the attacks from the internet have made me second guess
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,640 Posts
You definitely have your heart in the right place! There's a lot of risks with breeding dogs, it just happens that merle is one of the more obvious ones, because in most cases you can tell the parents have it by looking at them. Definitely have a plan in place in case you do have one or more impaired puppies, and now that you know at least you can avoid dapple x dapple matings in the future. No one who loves dogs wants to bring seriously disabled puppies into the world on purpose.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top