Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
My husband and I recently adopted a 6-month-old yellow lab mix puppy. We are in the process of crate training and would appreciate any tips anyone has to offer.
Thanks!
Stacey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
make the crate good. feed in the crate(door open at first, then closed after a few days, and alternate closed/open). give a tasty treat when in the crate. crate when you are still in the room. leave to do a chore, come back. NEVER let him out of the crate when he is whining. leave the door open so he can lie there if he wants.

that's all I can think of right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
"Crate Training

When done correctly and used in appropriate circumstances, crate training can work wonders. Crate training is sometimes misunderstood and may be seen as cruel. The fact is that it is far from cruel because 1) no one is advocating crating a dog all day and 2) most dogs love their crates. Why do I say most dogs love them? I say this because dogs are, by nature, den animals. Dogs will feel comfortable and secure in their crate. However, some dogs do not like them because of past negative experiences or simply because the novelty of it. With these dogs, and any dog that is hesitant with the crate, it is important to take it slow and avoid being pushy. The dog has must be slowly conditioned to like the crate and view it as a place where it can to go be safe and unperturbed.

Getting Acquainted

Crate training is most successful when started with a puppy, but the following guidelines can be used with older dogs as long as more patience is put forth by the owner.

The first step is helping the pup getting acquainted with the crate and helping establish a positive association. This is done by placing a small enticing treat, such as a piece of ham, inside the crate and encouraging the pooch to get it. You can take it a step further and give the pup his dinner inside the crate. For these exercises, do not close the crate door nor step away, you must stay there to reassure the pup, but don‘t coddle him because he may think that there IS something to be afraid of. Maybe while playing fetch with a toy, you could throw the toy inside the crate once or twice just to get the pup accustomed to going in and out of the crate.

Next step is to get the pup inside and close the crate door. Placing a kong filled with tasty treats, rewards the pup for being alone and quiet. Do this for a couple minutes at a time, no extended periods of time yet. Maybe 2 minutes the first time, then 5 minutes later 10 minutes, etc. While placing the pup in the crate for these times, do not leave the room, but don’t stand in front of the crate either. Pretend you are doing something else and do are not paying too much attention to the crate, especially if the puppy is whining. You may let the puppy out once it has been in the crate for the designated time and as long as it is quite. If the puppy is constantly whining and he does not seem like he will stop, then wait for a moment where the whining or barking is not as bad to let him out. Try not to fuss over the puppy after releasing him from the crate is because it might start to look forward to being let out of the crate which may lead to whining or barking while crated. It is all right to praise the pup for doing a good job as long as it is done in a manner that will not excite the puppy. If the pooch does not take well to the crate being closed, keep on trying to help him associate the crate with positive things.

After getting a pooch comfortable with the crate, it is time to put it in the appropriate place. The ideal area for a crate is in a corner of the room that is out of the way, yet not isolated, from human traffic. The dog will most likely enjoy an area where he can observe everyone and monitor what is going on. Placing a sleeping matt in the crate (if potty trained) will make it all the much more comfortable to be in. Even if the pooch does not go in there willingly to retire, the pup is less likely to make a fuss when it is necessary to crate him.

Problems

There are a couple problems that may arise when crate training, probably the most common is barking and whining. It is of utmost important never to give in and take the puppy out in order to stop its fussing. If we take out a puppy when it is whining, it teaches him that it can get out by whining, causing more persistent whining the next time he is crated. Feeding it tidbits will also reinforce the effectiveness of barking or whining. For noisy pups it is just a matter of ignoring it until it quiets down (easier said than done, I know). If the pup is taken out when it is quiet, this teaches the puppy that it will get what it wants if it is quiet. However if the puppy is quiet for a time and all of the sudden starts to whine, suspect that he might need to go to the bathroom, and take him outside quickly and without much fuss.

Sometimes the reassuring presence of an owner will be enough to stop the constant whining. Putting the crate in the owner’s room is an option. If this alternative is not convenient in your particular circumstance, another reassuring method is to take clothing with your scent (such as a sweater) and place it in the crate with the pup. If you have just recently acquired your puppy from its litter, the most probable thing is that your scent will not be as comforting as the scent of its littermates. In this case give the breeder a blanket or cloth that can be put near the litter to acquire its scent, this way when it comes times to take the puppy, it has something familiar to help cope with the change. Placing this blanket wrapped around a bottle of warm water (to imitate the warmth of the litter) in the crate might do wonders to quiet down a puppy and get it very comfortable with its crate. If for some reason the pup takes to chewing and shredding whatever you place in the crate yet isn‘t quiet without it, then simply place the blanket over the crate to allow the scent to soothe the pup but also prevent the him from chewing on it."


There you go! From a site I'm building, hope it helps;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,387 Posts
Congrats on your new puppy!!! I don't know if these have been mentioned...but a few tips:

*Make the crate somewhere fun, somewhere the dog wants to go. I always give my dogs a snack when they go into their crate...usually some peanut butter in their kong.

*Start the training in short period of times. Start off by leaving the puppy in for a short period of time when you're in the room, maybe when you're doing housework or eatting dinner or something. Then move up to more extended period of times, eventually you can maybe go somewhere and leave the pup in the crate alone.

*Patience! Puppies will usually whine and cry when in their crates until they get used to them. And puppies will also sometimes potty at first in their crates. My Belle pooped in her crate all the time, my Penny peed once and nothing since. So it really depends on the dog.

*Never use the crate for punishment. It will get confused when it is put in their when you have to go somewhere.

Um...that's all I can think of. Good luck! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
what do you do if you live in an apartment and you can't let your puppy whine all day and night? do you "shush" her? sometimes my BF will say in a direct (but not yelling) tone "maddie sleep/laydown". and he will tap the crate just once at the same time. but when that doesn't work we can't let her whine, we can get in trouble for noise. she is a small dog and will not grow up to be a big dog so it's not unfair that she lives in an apartment. she has plenty of room to romp outside. unfortunately there have been times when she is whailing (even after she's eaten and went potty) in her crate and we have to take her out. now i think it's confusing her and she only wants to be in there when she's asleep.

is peanut butter in kongs ok for young pups?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,997 Posts
I think expecting a 6 month old dog to stay in a crate all day long and hold it for that long is expecting too much. If the dog is eliminating in the crate, it's your fault. The dog has been in there too long and can't hold it any more. There are some execeptions to this rule as pet stores and puppy millers are known to keep dogs in situations where they're forced to eliminate where they sleep.

That being said, I would make a toy a designated crate toy. Fasten it to the back of the crate so the dog can't play with it while outside the crate and let the dog play with the toy in the crate with the door open. Feed meals inside the crate and practice the crate command every time the dog goes in. As the dog is going in the crate for any reason, cue the behavior with the command.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,466 Posts
If you live in an apartment I would combine the crate with an ex-pen and, when you're going to have to leave the dog for the day set up the ex-pen with the crate iside the pen (crate door open) and set it up in the kitchen area (easy to clean).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
If you live in an apartment I would combine the crate with an ex-pen and, when you're going to have to leave the dog for the day set up the ex-pen with the crate iside the pen (crate door open) and set it up in the kitchen area (easy to clean).
ok but what is an ex-pen? like a baby gate that enclosed them into a certain area? i just call them play pens. lol.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top