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Discussion Starter #1
I am getting a dog soon (a small Japanese breed, 10in tall, about 8 pounds as an adult), and I have a couple questions. I currently live in Tokyo, and it seems like sometime people keep using puppy pads even when dogs are adults. I live in a tiny apartment (250sqft), of course I plan on taking my dog out for walks twice a day at least. That being said, I am thinking it might be convenient to keep the puppy pads as an option in case I need to stay out late one night, or there is a hurricane, etc. Here are my questions:

1. What are the complications that could arise in the future if I choose to keep her on puppy pads (as well as going outside at the same time)?
2. If I do keep her on puppy pads, will getting a larger crate and keeping the pad in the crate with her as an adult be a bad thing or a problem?

When I leave her alone at home (usually at most it will be 3 hour periods) she will always be in her crate. I am trying to pick a crate size. If I dont keep the pads in with her, I know you should get a smaller crate so they dont feel like they have the ability to pee in the crate. If I do use the pads through adult hood I would need a bigger crate. So I kind of need to decide now. What do people think about this issue?
 

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There are some complications that could come up if you stick with puppy pads. Sometimes the dog will learn that it's ok to go indoors and go wherever it pleases. Anything resembling the puppy pads they might thing it's ok to go on. Sometimes a dog will learn that it only can go indoors and won't potty outside. Never put the puppy pad in the crate with her, you don't want her to learn that crate = potty. If you want just buy 1 crate and not to buy multiples as she grows, use a divider or a pillow to make the space smaller and just remove it when she gets bigger. If you want to restrict her freedom, but still have her indoor potty, try a play pen or baby gates to section off part or your place.

I'll tell you my experience with my puppy, I've trained her to go outside and litter box trained her as well. When we first got her for the first couple of months, I took her outside exclusively. When it was getting closer to her spay surgery, I bought a 3-part kitty litter box (it had 2 solid trays and 1 tray was a grid) and some astro-turf. I cut up the astro-turf to fit the size of the litter box and I poked a many holes in them. This way the litter box looked like a section of grass, and I had multiple stacks of astro-turf so I could change it out and clean them and always had a dry one ready. Since puppy pads can get expensive over time, I made this so I could use regular newspaper and flyers I got for free. The news paper would go under the grid and the astro-turf on top of the grid. To train her to use it, I soaked up some of her urine in a paper towel and I rubbed it on her litter box, and left it in there. When it would be time to potty, I would closer her off into her play pen with only enough room to either go into her litter box or her bed. She tried so hard to avoid the litter box that she would squeeze herself between the litter box and her bed and go there, LOL. But after a couple of days she finally tried out the litter box, and that was it, she was trained. I praised her profusely when she used the litter box, just lavished her with treats and attention. For the first week, I only lightly rinsed her astro-turf, and left the urine soaked newspaper underneath or a piece of it and piled new paper on top. It was stinky, but it screamed "Pee here!!". I admit there were a few accidents, the puppy had to learn how to aim and position herself, but now she uses the litter box like a pro. Since the litter box had 2 solid trays, I would turn them into 2 litter boxes for when we were gone longer. Wicket always preferred going outside, and would go to the door first to let me know she wanted to potty. If I didn't response to her, she would just walk over to her litter box and go in there. If I take away the litter boxes, she will hold it in until I let her out or I put the litter boxes back. She is so well trained that she only needs part of the litter box to go. So on days when it's raining bad or too late (and scary) to take her outside, I take the grid portion and put it in the bathtub, and she will go in there. I just rinse down her pee with water and clean her up. Poops still have to happen on the astro-turf though, lol. Now she only gets her litter box when it's impossible to go outside (rain, harsh winter) or if we have to leave her alone for more than 5 hours.

Your experience will be different from mine if you do choose to take this route. If you want to do this, I strongly recommend take her out as often as you can in the beginning to reinforce, outside = potty. But unlike me, you could have the litter box there at the beginning if you choose. You just need to make sure you rub the puppy pad with pee (or the litter box if you make one too), so that you encourage her to go into it. Closing her off into the bathroom or putting her in a play pen that was folded small, and making her space tiny when it's potty time will only give her the one option to go, and that's on the pad/litter box. It'll be tough, there will be accidents, but I think it'll be worth it in the end. This way you don't have to rush home to let the dog out, and she has an emergency back up for potty. Also having the potty separated from her crate is good so that the dog won't be stuck next to her poo and pee until you get home.

If you want to see pictures of my litter box, let me know and I'll be more than happy to post some up.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ok, the only problem is, this species is notorious for jumping super high, so anywhere I leave her while Im out has to have a top, that's why I thought like a 3ftx2ft crate with a puppy pad on one side. But maybe a crate that big is really not ok?
 

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It's really hard to say. Sometimes what a breed is prone to do can be shaped or trained so it doesn't really do it that much. My dog is mixed with shih tzu and pekingese, and both are supposed to be really yappy and noisy. When we got her, she barely made any noise. And if she did vocalized, if it was for attention we ignored it (so she knows it doesn't work so stopped doing it), and if was at the door or a strange sound I corrected her with a firm "No! No barking" and distracted her right away. We got her at 7 weeks and started training right away, and still she will not bark. She will make noises when we play rough with her but that is it. I can say, if you dedicate the time into training, prevention, and enforcing the rules, you can probably teach your dog that jumping is not okay. If fact, there is a chance you might find out that she will be okay in your apartment by herself, and doesn't need to be crated all the time when you're gone. Though, the only way to find out is to do trial runs and see what happens (after she gets a little older of course). We found out Wicket behaved the best when she wasn't in a crate or in the play pen. If you're not gone for very long periods at a time, you probably don't need to have a puppy pad in with her, and as she gets older she will be able to hold it in longer. I really want to advise against that big of a crate and putting her puppy pad in with her, it just that things can get really messy and housebreaking and crate training can be so much harder that way. She might start soiling her bed too once the puppy pad is gone, or not even use the pad and use her bed. I've seen and cleaned up some pretty nasty messes (not just from my dog). It's your call in the end, though. And if you do decide to go with the big crate, make sure there is a clear division between her bed area and the potty area. I think there are crates out there with a removable extra wall (to make the crate shorter) that you can cut a hole in. There might be some out there with the hold already cut in. If not, make one. This way there is less of a chance of her soiling her bed, and if she runs around in there she doesn't smear everything all over the place.
 

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I'm not much help with puppy pad advice (although Cali was newspaper and outside housetrained).. but as for crates, Cali did just fine in her crate for 8 hours a day.. although up until she was maybe 3 months old, my mom came home to take her out at lunch time. She's never had an accident in it either, and it's a crate for medium dogs (Cali being a 5lb Papillon). We do, however, have a smaller crate for her to take naps in and the larger crate just serves as an x-pen of sorts.

Also, what breed exactly? I'd love to see some pictures. :)
 

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My dog uses piddle pads- never had any issue, and she is "hard to housebreak" breed apparently- they are scented to attract the dogs to go, so she only goes there. She's missed twice by peeing on t he edge- in 6 months.

I don't crate her- I have 570 sq ft- but she did chew a lot when teething, I gave her sinew to chew on and frozen baby carrots (or just cut up a carrot and freeze) and that helped her focus her chewing need

I sprayed Bitter Apple on the few things she couldn't resist- like a baseboard!

I live in a very densely populated area of low and highrises, everyone here walks their dog every four hours (or has a dog walker midday) but also often leave a pad for doggie emergencies
 

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Discussion Starter #7
At this point the only option would be to leave it in the crate with her, because I wont trust her out alone in my apartment. I am just getting worried, because although it would be convenient, I have heard scary things about allowing your dog to use pads, like the dog starts peeing everywhere. Some people say you should never allow a dog to think its okay to go to the bathroom anytime inside. I'm just worried she wont be able to hold it because of her blatter size.
 

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She won't be able to hold it in for very long unless you're getting her at an older age. When she does have an accident and goes potty on something she's not suppose to, make sure you clean it with a really good enzymatic cleaner like Nature's Miracle. Even if we can see it or smell it, she would be able to and might be tempted to go on that spot again if it's not cleaned well. What also helps is if you feed her, train, and play with her on top of the accident spot. This will show her that the spot is not supposed to be where potty happens. You can get puppy pads that have a scent on them to encourage her to go on them, there are also sprays you can get to make it smell like a potty. Also you can always use her own pee scent as well. The goal is to show her, when you're inside, you're only supposed to go on the puppy pads. Don't forget to give her lots of praise and treats when she does go on the puppy pad, and never scold or yell at her when she goes on anything else. If you scold her, you might accidentally make her afraid of going to potty in front of you. If you catch her about to go, make a fuss like "no no" but not yelling or angry, rush her to the puppy pad and encourage her to go on there. As long as you're consistent, you can make it happen :D
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Of course as a puppy she wont be able to hold it, but because she is a tiny breed, even as an adult she wont be able to hold it long right?
 

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She should be able to hold it in when she's an adult. She might not be able to hold it in for a full 8 hours, but for sure more than 5 hours. You would have to wait until she grows up to see how long she can actually hold it.
 
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