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Not sure if it's going to get flagged, but thought I'd post the link so some may see before it does. It's called 'a letter from a shelter manager (best of craigslist)'

http://wenatchee.craigslist.org/pet/1007472731.html

A Letter from a Shelter Manager

I think our society needs a huge "Wake-up" call. As a shelter manager, I am going to share a little insight with you all...a view from the inside if you will.


First off, all of you breeders/sellers should be made to work in the "back" of an animal shelter for just one day. Maybe if you saw the life drain from a few sad, lost, confused eyes, you would change your mind about breeding and selling to people you don't even know.


That puppy you just sold will most likely end up in my shelter when it's not a cute little puppy anymore. So how would you feel if you knew that there's about a 90% chance that dog will never walk out of the shelter it is going to be dumped at? Purebred or not! About 50% of all of the dogs that are "owner surrenders" or "strays", that come into my shelter are purebred dogs.


The most common excuses I hear are; "We are moving and we can't take our dog (or cat)." Really? Where are you moving too that doesn't allow pets? Or they say "The dog got bigger than we thought it would". How big did you think a German Shepherd would get? "We don't have time for her". Really? I work a 10-12 hour day and still have time for my 6 dogs! "She's tearing up our yard". How about making her a part of your family? They always tell me "We just don't want to have to stress about finding a place for her we know she'll get adopted, she's a good dog".


Odds are your pet won't get adopted & how stressful do you think being in a shelter is? Well, let me tell you, your pet has 72 hours to find a new family from the moment you drop it off. Sometimes a little longer if the shelter isn't full and your dog manages to stay completely healthy. If it sniffles, it dies. Your pet will be confined to a small run/kennel in a room with about 25 other barking or crying animals. It will have to relieve itself where it eats and sleeps. It will be depressed and it will cry constantly for the family that abandoned it. If your pet is lucky, I will have enough volunteers in that day to take him/her for a walk. If I don't, your pet won't get any attention besides having a bowl of food slid under the kennel door and the waste sprayed out of its pen with a high-powered hose. If your dog is big, black or any of the "Bully" breeds (pit bull, rottie, mastiff, etc) it was pretty much dead when you walked it through the front door.


Those dogs just don't get adopted. It doesn't matter how 'sweet' or 'well behaved' they are.


If your dog doesn't get adopted within its 72 hours and the shelter is full, it will be destroyed. If the shelter isn't full and your dog is good enough, and of a desirable enough breed it may get a stay of execution, but not for long . Most dogs get very kennel protective after about a week and are destroyed for showing aggression. Even the sweetest dogs will turn in this environment. If your pet makes it over all of those hurdles chances are it will get kennel cough or an upper respiratory infection and will be destroyed because shelters just don't have the funds to pay for even a $100 treatment.


Here's a little euthanasia 101 for those of you that have never witnessed a perfectly healthy, scared animal being "put-down".


First, your pet will be taken from its kennel on a leash. They always look like they think they are going for a walk happy, wagging their tails. Until they get to "The Room", every one of them freaks out and puts on the brakes when we get to the door. It must smell like death or they can feel the sad souls that are left in there, it's strange, but it happens with every one of them. Your dog or cat will be restrained, held down by 1 or 2 vet techs depending on the size and how freaked out they are. Then a euthanasia tech or a vet will start the process. They will find a vein in the front leg and inject a lethal dose of the "pink stuff". Hopefully your pet doesn't panic from being restrained and jerk. I've seen the needles tear out of a leg and been covered with the resulting blood and been deafened by the yelps and screams. They all don't just "go to sleep", sometimes they spasm for a while, gasp for air and defecate on themselves.


When it all ends, your pets corpse will be stacked like firewood in a large freezer in the back with all of the other animals that were killed waiting to be picked up like garbage. What happens next? Cremated? Taken to the dump? Rendered into pet food? You'll never know and it probably won't even cross your mind. It was just an animal and you can always buy another one, right?


I hope that those of you that have read this are bawling your eyes out and can't get the pictures out of your head I deal with everyday on the way home from work.


I hate my job, I hate that it exists & I hate that it will always be there unless you people make some changes and realize that the lives you are affecting go much farther than the pets you dump at a shelter.


Between 9 and 11 MILLION animals die every year in shelters and only you can stop it. I do my best to save every life I can but rescues are always full, and there are more animals coming in everyday than there are homes.


My point to all of this DON'T BREED OR BUY WHILE SHELTER PETS DIE!


Hate me if you want to. The truth hurts and reality is what it is. I just hope I maybe changed one persons mind about breeding their dog, taking their loving pet to a shelter, or buying a dog. I hope that someone will walk into my shelter and say "I saw this and it made me want to adopt". THAT WOULD MAKE IT WORTH IT
 

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They have a decent point and mean well but they are addressing the issue in the wrong place to the wrong people.

I finished the first half but couldn't read anymore. For one, it wasn't worth it. Secondly, I don't like reading sad stuff like that.

I can't even watch those "animal police" shows on Animal Planet because it's so sad to me to watch the poor animals on the show.

I can watch all kinds of "Faces of Death" type stuff of humans getting killed, etc., but when it comes to animals being neglected or abused, I can't take it. Strange, isn't it?

But anyway, I'm sure that will be taken off CL soon as most other crap people post is, too.
 

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I've read that before. Every potential pet owner needs to read it. Most people who drop their pets off at shelters fool themselves into thinking their pet will be adopted to a loving home, this article describes the sad truth.
 

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Yeah, that's been pasted all over the internet lately. The actual letter itself is quite a few years old, but lately I've seen it brought up over and over again on several lists and forums. It's a good letter, with a good point. Working in shelters, rescues, and being the one (too many times) holding down the dog that dies because it simply didn't get a home, I think it's good that the letter has been spread around as much as it has.

I was just talking with a fellow volunteer earlier, and she gave me the stats for the animal control facility in the next parish, the one I've worked with the most. In 2007, that ONE facility euthanized 10,838 dogs and cats. That's nearly 11,000 animals dead because they were abandoned, strays, or dropped off because they weren't wanted any longer. And if you think most were mutts, you'd be wrong. Over one third were pure-breds, and ranged from full blooded labs and pugs to boston terriers and poodles.

It's a sad shame. And the truth is, the letter was right, at least with a lot of the AC's I've worked with. If you are dropping off a bully breed, or if your dog is black or a plain brown shepherd mix, it was practically dead the second you dropped it off.

There used to be a sign that hung on the outside of the gate that lead into an animal control facility in another parish. It read: "Before you walk through this gate, please stop and consider this. We have, at any given time, over 50 large, black dogs that may never walk out of here. If you are looking for a large dog, please considering adopting one of these large, black dogs. Because the fact is, no one wants a large, black dog."

I fostered a large, black dog for nearly a year. She was one of my greatest fosters ever, and I loved her dearly.

Anyways, I like that letter, and I wish people considering leaving their dog at the pound would read it before making that final decision. Maybe it would change their mind.
 

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Now that's one letter I HAVEN'T read! Thanks for sharing Zim, I enjoyed that one. And how true.

Reminds me about a year and a half ago, I was at the pound picking up two rabbits for the rescue I was with. I was in the back, waiting to be let in, when this truck pulls up with a crate in the back. I walk over and ask if they were dropping a dog off. This guy gets out and goes yeah, my wife doesn't want it anymore. He opens up this small kennel, no bigger than one made for a beagle, and out squeezes this huge yellow lab/chow mix weighing around 80 pounds or so. I tell them that the pound is having a strict euthanasia rule right now, and that the dog WILL be put down. He goes and asks anyways, and they tell him the same thing. I'm standing there with his wife, explaining this, and he comes walking back looking sad and tells her, "they said they'll put him down the second we leave."

She tells me, "I don't CARE! He sheds, he barks, and he's dirty! Now, hand him over to the man!"

I looked over at the receiving guy at the pound, who I know all too well, and tell him not to worry, that I'll take it. And I did. I loaded him into the back of my truck. She then proceeded to tell me that she got HER (it was a female) a year before out of the Walmart parking lot. Someone had a litter they were giving away for free, and her kids couldn't resist. So they took one home. It was a cute puppy in the beginning, she said, but then it got way bigger than they thought it would. Then her kids lost interest. Then they stuck it outside, where it went from a pet, to an annoyance. So she decided to bring it to the pound.

That woman had no remorse for leaving that dog there, and I can only thank God, and still do till this day, that I was there to take it in instead. It was a wonderful sweetheart of a dog, loved other dogs, but had no manners and was a wild child. I taught her socialization, training, manners, had her spayed and vaccinated, and put her up for adoption thru one of the rescues I was with. The rescue director that I am friends with loved her so much, she fostered her herself, and then decided to actually keep her. It's been a year and a half, and "Sandy" couldn't be a happier dog.

I wish anyone dropping off their dog at the pound, would first be required to watch a shelter animal being euthanized in person. And then let them know that their dog has a 95% chance or so of that happening to it. Maybe that would change a few minds.
 

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*Sigh*
I'll be fostering a dog soon because my co-worker's friend was just going to drop it off at a reputedly high kill shelter. She doesn't care if the dog dies. My co-worker came straight to me.
I will be accepting donations...
 

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I for one, have never seen this before, LoneWolf......Wow.....:(....:(

Zim....nevewr got ro read yours.....it was flagged/pulled....:(
 

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I for one, have never seen this before, LoneWolf......Wow.....:(....:(

Zim....nevewr got ro read yours.....it was flagged/pulled....:(
It was called 'An Open Letter to Mr. and Ms. Average Pet Owner'

and it was ANGRY.

the only part I remember a lot of specifics was where the writer was saying something like

I've gotten the point where I was people would just be truthful

"I can't control this dog that I picked up in a Walmart parking lot because Im lazy and so the dog is giving me an inferiority complex because of that
------

it was brutal.
 

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Yea, I couldn't read the second craigstlist post either.. But the one the OP posted pretty much broke my heart. Imagining my little baby being put down just makes me feel terrible. I would never want that to happen to my dog, even if he became more ill than he is now.. But knowingly bringing your dog to a shelter where there's no guarantee he's going to make it out alive? That is too heartless.
 

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Another generalization lumping all breeders together and making them BAD. UGH.

It doesn't make me feel guilty in the least.
 

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On a couple of her shows, Victoria Stillwell has taken dog owners to the shelter if they have told her they were thinking of getting rid of their dog because of behavior problems. Walking through the kennels generally motivates the people to try a little harder with the training.
 

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Another generalization lumping all breeders together and making them BAD. UGH.

It doesn't make me feel guilty in the least.
While the post does mention breeders in the very beginning, I think that if you read it you will see it isn't supposed to make YOU feel guilty. It's clearly aimed at uneducation and misinformed pet owners who obtain animals on a whim and then get rid of them when they aren't perfect. Breeders aren't mentioned a second time, but these foolish people are.

Heck, it made ME feel guilty on behalf of others whose bad pet behavior I have witnessed as a shelter volunteer.
 

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As in most cases where a writer appeals to his reader's conscience on behalf of the weak, those who need to listen most will not, and sometimes cannot. There's very sound scientific evidence to support the idea that a fair chunk of the population--one to three percent--is fundamentally incapable of empathy. Trying to sting the heart of a person like this is like demanding a push-up from an armless man. And that's only the very worst of humanity. I get the impression that even most non-sociopaths aren't much bothered by an animal's suffering. There have been numerous occasions when I was in a group of people, and someone laughingly mentioned something he or his friends once did to torment an animal. Invariably, I was the only one who spoke up in protest. Sometimes my objections caused a change of subject, but just as often, they only inspired an escalation of horror stories. It's very unlikely that all of those people were sociopaths. It seems more likely that they simply represent typical humanity--insensitive, terrified of their friends' disapproval, jelly-spined.

Words, no matter how eloquent or passionate, can't make anyone grow a soul. Most people are trash. They will continue to be trash regardless of what those of us with strong consciences do or say. Writing like this is good for rallying the troops, and nothing more.
 

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I have seen and read much like this letter, but it still made me bawl like a baby. Unfortunately, the people it addresses will be the last to read it, and many of them won't care.

Society is to blame for what is happening in animal shelters. Obviously it is up those of us who truly love dogs to find a solution, and breeders should and must shoulder some of that responsibility. I am new to this forum, and I do not want to offend any one but the question I have for breeders is this: how can you possibly justify continuing to breed when millions are dying in shelters for lack of good homes?

I understand loving a certain breed, and wanting to see that breed remain pure. I for one have always dreamed of having a yellow Lab, and I do not want to see that breed lost to us. In a perfect world, I would have adopted one, but I have never looked at a dog who needed my help and rejected him because of his breeding or color. As a result, all of my dogs have been black, and most mutts. Not because I chose them but because they came to me in need. Therefore, I have never had the room to go out and choose the yellow lab I have always wanted. The closest I came to it was a black Lab/Golden mix who came from a breeder who left her rejects to be sold at pet store I once worked at. He was the only out of his siblings to survive a Parvo outbreak in the store, and was slated to be put down because the pet store did not want to take the risk of selling him, and then being financially responsible if later he came down with Parvo. So I took him home with me, and he was my dog soulmate.

But that breeder did not care what happened to her rejects, whether they all died of Parvo, or were sold to anyone who had $50, and later abandoned them to shelters or the streets, or if they went on to produce more unwanted mutts. I am sure she produced many litters with AKC papers at top price to make up for the loss she sustained on that one imperfect litter. You will say she is one example of an irresponsible breeder. Granted, that is true. But the fact that the AKC grants papers to puppies from puppy mills is proof enough that there are more irresponsible breeders than responsible, and when you come down to it, is is merely a business to them, and it is not done for love of the breed. The fact that the AKC blocks every attempt to regulate the breeders is more proof that it is all about money, not love.
 

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But the fact that the AKC grants papers to puppies from puppy mills is proof enough that there are more irresponsible breeders than responsible, and when you come down to it, is is merely a business to them, and it is not done for love of the breed. The fact that the AKC blocks every attempt to regulate the breeders is more proof that it is all about money, not love.

Yep......:mad:
 

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Another generalization lumping all breeders together and making them BAD. UGH.

It doesn't make me feel guilty in the least.
Not that im a breeder but i kinda thought the same a bit.
Its an awesome letter but what i have learned here is the very big difference between a reputable breeder and a BYB.

At the end of the day a person who buys a puppy and spends that extra cheddar on a pup that has all the health,temperment tests etc is less likely to abandon thier pup for ridiculous reasons.

Sounds bad but money talks,if you pay just a few dollars for a puppy it makes it that much easier to dispose of to many *shouldnt be* owners,simple as that.
 
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