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It was warm enough today to let the dogs hang out on the deck with the door open. About noon they were just lounging around, surveying their domain when they suddenly started jumping around and barking. It was a much more serious bark than their usual "Look, the neighbor is taking out the garbage" bark. So I went outside to check. Three quite large, healthy looking coyotes were making their way, in no hurry, across the side yard and up the back.

This time of year we don't usually see coyotes... and never at NOON. If we do, it's one scraggly, skinny one, very early in the morning. We have about half of our usual snowpack, so prey is much more available right now than usual. The coyotes haven't had to move to lower elevations to find food. These guys were very well fed.

They hung out in the trees behind the house for a few minutes (with the dogs going ballistic the whole time) and then moved off.

I'm glad the deck is on the second floor so the dogs couldn't get out. I'm not going to be walking the dogs out the back for a while.
 

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Hmmmm yeah it is strange for them to be out at that hour. Well hopefully they don't come back around. We have loads of them out here but they don't start until later in the evening. Usually around 5-6 they'll be out and about.
 

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Yikes. That is scary. The coyotes around here can get pretty bold, too. A local town council authorized shooting parties if they get a request from a pet owner whose dog has been killed. On the one hand that really frosts me because it's usually someone who let a dog out loose alone knowing there are coyotes in the area. Duh! On the other hand, I know it's too much to expect people to suddenly acquire a healthy respect for wildlife - enough to know what to do or not do in a given situation. Which means there will be clashes and torch parties to exterminate the coyotes. Sad. Very sad.
 

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My neighbor just told me tonight that she went to work at 4:45AM (Starbucks), was waiting in her car in the strip mall parking lot for the manager with the key to show up, and six healthy coyotes came into the parking lot and lingered on a grassy patch just in front of her car, and they stuck around for about 10 minutes, not bothered at all by traffic or humans waling down the sidewalk to the hospital across the road. That's scary, bold, not normal. There is a nearby greenbelt area in a new housing development that is filled with water fowl and small prey. But jeesh! (and I don't live all that far from Rowdy, must be some migrating going on in our area)
 

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We've had a lot more daytime coyote sightings in the city here, this year. =/ It's kinda scary, but also saddening, since we all know why they're showing themselves more...=/
 

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That sucks. Around these parts they wouldn't last long. Open season on them 24/7.

They usually only show up around night time.

But we don't live in a major city type area, so I guess I can understand how it could be a little tougher in the city.
 

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This is just me and I am not advising anyone. We all have to do what we feel is best to keep our dogs safe.


Coyotes are a newcomer in the State of Florida. The first one I saw was about 20 years or so ago. In that time their numbers have exploded. They are very common in most of the state now. Even in the larger cities. They have coyote problems on the runways of Tampa International Airport.

Here it is now commonplace to see them both day and night.

I spend a lot of time in the woods and on farms and ranches. Many times I have my dog (sometimes my wife's dog as well) with me. I have had no issues and don't antipate any.

If I had small dogs, I would be very cautious any place there might be coyotes. I certainly would not allow them out even in a fenced yard (many folks would be amazed to see how easily coyotes can get over fences.)

With medium and larger dogs especially those of a breed or type the leans toward being a little tenacious, I am not overly worried. They seem curious and watch and have at times followed. But once the dog or dogs start barking at them they seem to move out.

I did have an interesting incident recently. I was hiking with my ACD Merlin. We came around a curve in the trail and there was a coyote standing at the edge of the trail. He staired at us for a few seconds and my dog barked at him in an unfriendly manner. The coyote rain off into the woods to our right. Once in there it started yapping/howling. At least two more joined in. As I stood there listening to them, Merlin began to howl (he is a howler, firetrucks, sirens, etc) When Merlin started in, the coyotes all shut up. I am not sure what this means It was just interesting.

Again this is personal opinion, but I really don't think coyotes want anything to do with most medium or larger sized dogs. WAY too much risk. Predators don't tend to go after stuff when there is no clear advantage.

Running them with hounds is becoming qutie common here. Typically big fast long legged hounds. Walkers, Foxhounds, Plotts, etc.

It has not caught on here yet (I don't really think it will because there is not much in the way of wide open country) but in some places they hunt them with greyhounds and other sighthounds. The American Staghound ( a cross between the Scottish Deerhound, Greyhound, and Irish wolfhound)was developed at least in part to course coyotes.


Something to remember
 

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My french teacher had three shelties in her fenced in backyard. They weren't unsupervised long when she heard yelping and chaos. So she ran back there only to find a coyote attacking one of her shelties while the other two tried to get it off. My teacher chased the coyote off and it just jumped over the fence. Two of her shelties sustained injuries. One died at the clinic and the other lost an eye in addition to needing stitches and a hefty vet bill.
I felt terrible. She didn't come in to teach for over a week.:(
 

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Some of the coyotes around here have some balls, too. My cousin was out on the tractor one day a couple of years ago when a pack of coyotes came out and swarmed around him. Good thing his dog hadn't followed him out there!
 

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That's SO scary!! I don't remember EVER seeing a live coyote befor in my life time!
My ex used to go coyote hunting with buddies years ago when we lived in rural Nebraska, but all I ever saw of them were the remnants from the hunt.
 

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They may be looking for a place to den up? Although being out an noon is odd. They used to be more diurnal but have become more crepuscular/nocturnal with people around. We have coyotes that live in the middle of the city, I used to run into them fairly frequently walking the dogs late at night/early morning. My boss said she just saw one that was dead on the side of the road in the middle of the city. They used to just look at us and keep on going, not really afraid, cautious, but not afraid, and not looking to get into anything. I do think though things are probably different depending on the season and how many there are. I only used to see 1 or 2 at a time. I think our coyotes are the bigger ones, they are about as big as Allie, maybe a bit smaller sometimes (allie weighs about 60 pounds).
 

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Coyotes are one of those wildlife species, like crows and canada geese, that have adapted extremely well to the expansion of the human species into the habitat and the landscape changes that have come along with development.

Here in Western Washington, the only coyote "attack" on a human that I know of was several years ago when a coyote bit a small child. But here's the kicker- an elderly woman in the area had been feeding this coyote, and then she passed away, so there went the meal ticket, and this coyote started approaching other humans in search of a meal. So if you have coyotes that seem awfully chill around humans, you might want to ask around in case someone is feeding them, and thus setting up what could be a bad situation.

There has been some pretty interesting research about coyotes in urban settings done in Chicago:
http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/urbcoyot.htm

Also, here are a couple of fact sheets from sources I know in Washington State:

http://www.paws.org/wildlife/resources/fact_sheets/coyotes.php

http://wdfw.wa.gov/wlm/living/coyotes.htm
 

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I don't see many coyotes, because it is open season on "varmints" all year long, and they know it. But, if you live in the country and either don't have a dog, or the farm cats go farther than the dog will protect them, it's a sure thing you'll lose most of your cats to the coyotes. They so far haven't started to come into my town to pick off housecats, but I know it's happened in other towns. I don't let my cats out.......

My aunt and uncle had a farm dog that lived to be 17 years old. He was a small dog (Peke/Poodle mix), but he ran with the coyotes every night, and possibly even fathered some coydog puppies (curly pups sighted in the area). He couldn't have weighed more than 25 pounds, but he was never hurt by the coyotes. His ear was ripped off by a badger, but never a coyote injury.
 

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One reason why leaving pet food outside is bad news. It attracts racoons, foxes, and coyotes. I feel bad for them, because it's actually US that's moving into THEIR homes, no the other way around. But I don't want them eating my dog either. =/
 

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round where i live ppls dogs get eaten by wolves left right and centre....right off their chains...leaving nothing behind but blood. nasty and creepy :S...
which drives me mad..cuz they just get another dog and keep it outside again.....my dog has a closed in pen for when she is outside and ALWAYS comes in at night.
 

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I live in an area between Seattle and the Cascade mts. and coyotes are the norm. They are more active between dusk and dawn but, can be out anytime. Just because you don't see them doesn't mean that they aren't there. Better safe than sorry. Always assume that they are present. We are on their turf so we must play by their rules.

Never leave small, old. or infirmed dogs unsupervised or better yet have them on a leash. Coyotes can jump high fences.
Never let your cat outside in an area with coyotes
Never leave animal food, including birdseed, or garbage cans out for animals to snack on
If you don't bother them they wont bother you (we are not on the menu)

Coyotes have had to become urban dwellers and we have made it easy for them by providing easy sources of food. A few years ago one even got into a Seattle courthouse midday, or was it a lawyer:D

Live and let live
 
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