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Discussion Starter #1
Bit of a back story. My mother in law's neighbor had adopted a purebred Australian Shepherd a few months back from a family off craigslist. The lady hasn't owned a dog since she was a kid and is a bit naive in dog care. This women lives way out in the middle of nowhere, on the edge of a national forest, so she get's wildlife on her property all the time. The dog, who is about 2 years old, is an intact female who had gone into heat about a month ago before the owner could get her spayed. During this time, the dog was left outside in the yard by herself for "just a minute", and when the owner returned, a coyote was in the yard, mounted to her and tied -_- Her husband grabbed his rifle and aimed to shoot the coyote, but was to afraid he'd miss and hit their dog, so they felt they had no choice but to let them finish. As soon as the coyote was done, he was shot and killed.

There's no mistake about the male's identity. It was not a dog, it was absolutely a coyote. And now her dog is pregnant. The obvious and logical answer would be an emergency spay, but she seriously doesn't want to do it because she thinks it would break her dog's heart, blah blah blah. Her plans are to allow her dog to go through with the pregnancy and birth, find homes for the pups and get her dog spayed. I think it's completely stupid, but it's her dog and her choice, thus there's nothing I can do about it.

I've heard it's a toss up and depends on what traits they get from what parent that determines their temperament. It's not set in stone, and we're still doing a lot of consideration, contemplation and research, but we're thinking about possibly taking one of the pups, and either raising it or fostering. I guess we won't really know for sure what we'll do until after they arrive and their personalities start developing and we see how our own dogs react. Charlotte, inspite of the aggression she can have towards strange adult dogs, she's always been very patient and maternal towards young pups, so I highly doubt she'll have any issues. It's Ma'ii I'm unsure of. I'm aware these won't be your ordinary dog. My friend has a coydog who's very very sweet, though also a bit quirky. I'm having trouble reaching him however for advice.

Does anyone have any experience with Coydogs? I'm not looking for slams and insults against the owner. The situation is what it is and there's nothing that can change things.
 

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I've known a few (supposed) coydogs. Farm dogs frequently end up pregnant by coyotes (or so their owners say). Most of them seem fairly normal (even being OK with cats, surprisingly), but a bit shy/skittish. I don't think they're similar to wolfdogs, but I still wouldn't recommend one for a home with small children.
 

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I have a friend and she met a coydog and it look totally coyote but she said it was a great dog. and other then looking more coyote it was just like a normal dog. so I guess it on how you raise the dog is to know for sure how it will turn out.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have a friend and she met a coydog and it look totally coyote but she said it was a great dog. and other then looking more coyote it was just like a normal dog. so I guess it on how you raise the dog is to know for sure how it will turn out.
Yeah, my friend's coydog is great. She's skittish at first, but once she realizes you're not going to hurt her, she get's affectionate and sweet.
 

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I think you have the smarts and know-how to raise and be the caregiver for an awesome dog. Raise it and treat it (socialize) just like a regular puppy so it can grow into a wonderful adult. With the types of dogs you own now, I think you can definately handle a coydog. I know of a couple of people who owned supposedly coydogs and you would never know it unless they told you

BTW- what breed is the mom and of course the rule is you have to post pics of your new pup:)
 

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I have a friend and she met a coydog and it look totally coyote but she said it was a great dog. and other then looking more coyote it was just like a normal dog. so I guess it on how you raise the dog is to know for sure how it will turn out.
Sometimes I wonder if my Josefina is a coydog (y'all know what she looks like by now I'm sure lol, I've posted enough pics LMBO.) we joke about how she looks like one.
 

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I do not have experience with coydogs other than I know what they are and that they're cool looking. But I think if your mother-in-law raises the puppies well (like raising her own Aussie or any other dog) I think you'll be fine. I don't see why they had to shoot the coyote afterwards, it was only mounting the dog, not attacking. But oh well...
 

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I've 'known' two people on other boards with coydogs- the real deal. Both had very special needs, much like wolfdogs. Skittishness, fear issues, escape artists, that kind of thing. Very intelligent, high prey drive. I definitely don't buy that 'it's all in how you raise them'. These are WILD dogs and they will show it. Go on Chaz and search for Gambit or on dog.com and search 'coydog' for Sophia stories. There's lots.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I do not have experience with coydogs other than I know what they are and that they're cool looking. But I think if your mother-in-law raises the puppies well (like raising her own Aussie or any other dog) I think you'll be fine. I don't see why they had to shoot the coyote afterwards, it was only mounting the dog, not attacking. But oh well...
Just wanted to clear up it's not my mother in-law with the dog, it's her neighbor. My mother in-law has three Pomeranians and would NEVER allow anything like this to happen lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I think you have the smarts and know-how to raise and be the caregiver for an awesome dog. Raise it and treat it (socialize) just like a regular puppy so it can grow into a wonderful adult. With the types of dogs you own now, I think you can definately handle a coydog. I know of a couple of people who owned supposedly coydogs and you would never know it unless they told you

BTW- what breed is the mom and of course the rule is you have to post pics of your new pup:)
Mom is a purebred Aussie.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I've 'known' two people on other boards with coydogs- the real deal. Both had very special needs, much like wolfdogs. Skittishness, fear issues, escape artists, that kind of thing. Very intelligent, high prey drive. I definitely don't buy that 'it's all in how you raise them'. These are WILD dogs and they will show it. Go on Chaz and search for Gambit or on dog.com and search 'coydog' for Sophia stories. There's lots.
I think raising and socialization is a good start but can only do so much. I think their temperament and personality is more decided upon by what traits they inherit from what parent.
 

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Coyotes generally only breed in February and both the male and female have to come into "heat". Are they sure it was a full bloodied coyote because per the date on your post the mating would have occured in January?
 

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the only thing I have to add is if its a smaller aussie- please let her know that there is a chance of her not being able to birth naturally due to size...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Coyotes generally only breed in February and both the male and female have to come into "heat". Are they sure it was a full bloodied coyote because per the date on your post the mating would have occured in January?
Yes, absolutely, this was a full blooded Coyote.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
the only thing I have to add is if its a smaller aussie- please let her know that there is a chance of her not being able to birth naturally due to size...
She looks like a regular size Aussie, but I'll pass that along anyways.
 

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Coyotes are small. . .35 pounds-ish. Unless she's super small I can't imagine the size would be a problem.
 

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I can't say I very much agree with killing the coyote after that. I'm pretty sure he's not the one who tied an intact bitch in season out near the forest. But whatever I guess.

Coyotes are dog-like in a sense, but are wild nevertheless. I've never had one myself but I do have a friend who has one and she has an extremely high preydrive, low tolerance for other dogs, but is extremely sweet. However, this was a dog that didn't get much socialization or training as a pup, so that could also be a factor.
 

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Coyotes are small. . .35 pounds-ish. Unless she's super small I can't imagine the size would be a problem.
Shhhh... I was hoping this might convince the owner to be a little more prepared (or espay?) Not that I think RCloud wouldnt be a good parent, but its going to be hard to find eight good LIFETIME parents.

edit: not saying you wouldnt be a good lifetime parent either. just that there arent enough of you!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I can't say I very much agree with killing the coyote after that. I'm pretty sure he's not the one who tied an intact bitch in season out near the forest. But whatever I guess. .
They witnessed the WHOLE thing. They're country folks who have been living on the edge of a wilderness in AZ from the time they were children. They KNOW what Coyotes look like and there is no mistaking about it. Period. While I don't agree with a lot of the ways they've handled this, including death of father, it was absolutely no questions asked a Coyote they shot and it was this Coyote that bred with their dog.
 

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They witnessed the WHOLE thing. They're country folks who have been living on the edge of a wilderness in AZ from the time they were children. They KNOW what Coyotes look like and there is no mistaking about it. Period. While I don't agree with a lot of the ways they've handled this, including death of father, it was absolutely no questions asked a Coyote they shot and it was this Coyote that bred with their dog.
Um, I didn't say anything about whether or not the father was a coyote. I don't doubt it. I said I don't agree with killing him. He's just an animal, doing what animals do. They're the ones who left their dog outside basically just throwing her to the wolves, so to speak. He wasn't attacking or destroying. What did he do that was so wrong it warranted his death? But that's 'country folks' for you I suppose. What's done is done.
 
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