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I was out today with my dog and was getting many comments about how pretty my dog is and what kind she was and came across a couple Vets that asked and i said a husky and they said i believe she may be mix with coyote. So i have been doing research online all night and looked at many pictures to compare them, i think i May have a husky coyote mix, She weighs about 50 pounds and comes just above my knees, very observant, protective, and quiet, doesn’t howl or bark but will make some noise when playing

So here are pictures of a coyote, a typical female husky, and then a few pictures of my dog Cleo

Look at her ears, tail, and color, those were the biggest standouts.

Please leave your comments and thoughts on what you think, I’ve been trying to figure out for about 2-3 hours now and i believe i have one but i need more people opinions
 

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I can't see all of the pictures (#4 and 5), but chances are she has no coyote in her, especially if her behavior isn't wildly different from what you'd expect from dogs, and what you've described isn't. I've only known one confirmed coydog (never met her in person, but have seen photos), but you absolutely could not mistake her for a domestic dog. I agree she doesn't look purebred husky, but nothing about her coloring, ears, or tail is out of the realm of possibility for a mix. They certainly don't scream high content coydog.

Additionally, I would urge you to NOT claim your dog is part coyote (or any other wild canid) without being 1000% sure, because it could end very poorly for her. Most notably, the rabies vaccine isn't tested on coyotes and wolves or their hybrids, so if she's recorded anywhere as a coydog and bites someone, she could very well be seized and euthanized to test for rabies, regardless of vaccination status. That's even before you get into whether it's even legal to own one where you are. Coydogs are rare, rare creatures, even moreso than genuine wolfdogs (as opposed to people who claim they have a wolfdog to sound cool). They are also reportedly very challenging animals to own and live with: often skittish, territorial, reactive, intolerant of strangers, interact with other dogs using confusing body language and sounds (coyotes and coydogs often "gape" when they feel threatened instead of showing teeth, and will hiss or yip, for example). Essentially, if it seems like your dog acts like, well, a dog? You probably don't have a hybrid.

EDIT: I should add, wild canids and hybrids have been seized and euthanized because people have falsely reported a bite. So it's a pretty big deal, and huge liability.
 

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That's a husky.

I mean I could say more, but just. No. That's a husky.
 

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I agree with them. ^^^ Sibe, with maybe, possibly, but not likely, a smidge of GSD. Sibes do come in parti-color, and that agouti coat pattern is super common in the breed.

And as mentioned, claiming hybrid status when you aren't 100% certain is NOT a good idea. A lot (most) areas have laws regarding non-domestic canids, ranging from banning them outright to placing severe restrictions on their housing and exposure to other animals and humans, and typically carrying some hefty penalties for not following the laws. Oh, yeah, most rabies vaccines aren't approved for hybrids, so....
 

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This ... is often what happens when people breed dogs without much attention to the actual breed standard, or much attention to the conformational faults of the dogs used for breeding. With poorly chosen dogs, even if the sire and dam are "purebred", some progeny may turn out looking fairly close to the standard. Others not so much. Which frequently leads people to speculate whether *something else* has been mixed in. Happens with poodles, GSDs, scottish terriers, and with every other breed.

In dog breeding circles, the technical term used to describe a uniform appearance throughout the generations is "typey". Think -- cookie cutter. Your dog is likely all husky, and she's beautiful in her own right, but she's just not typey.
 

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Husky, maybe a tad of GSD or, even another shepherd in there but, Husky. Hybrids with wild canines being true pets and, being able to be trained like dogs with no major issues is very rare. Those wild canines are not sociable animals toward humans and, the hybrids ted to be very much one owner animals, shying form other humans unanimously. It takes extra effort and time to get a hybrid to be sociable with humans other than their owners and, even then, they will only be sociable in the presence of their owner - it's what they think is required for the owner to continue to accept them as family members.

They also grow up and, find socializing with other dogs difficult when they reach age 3 to 4. Dogs get stuck at teenager but, the hybrids become full blown adults and, find dogs immature and annoying for the most part. Again a lot of time and effort has to go into getting them to accept dealing with other dogs peacefully and patiently.

I have four wolf hybrids - not pets as most dogs are. Companions, family members, amazing animals to share my life with but, not dogs - closer to socialized, trained wild animals, much like a performing animal for the entertainment industry is socialized and trained but, still a wild animal.

If you had a coydog, her mannerisms, instinctive behaviors and, wary nature would tell you she wasn't a normal domestic dog without anyone having to point out that fact.

Don't label her as a hybrid, I see far too many misidentified DOGS land in wold and coydog rescues when they are just normal dogs that someone wrongly called a hybrid. Sadly even more actual hybrid end up in rescues or, euthanized because the owners had no clue what they were in for with such animals. I'm not against people owning them but, I'm not in favor of uneducated people getting one before they know exactly what they are getting into either.
 

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You have a lovely husky. I have a friend on Facebook, she used to be active here, who DOES have a coydog, and trust me, they're unmistakable. Enjoy your very pretty husky girl and be grateful she isn't a hybrid, because while my friend loves hers dearly, they are NOT something the average dog owner is equipped to deal with.
 

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That is a husky. I don't know what vets you're talking to, but that is unmistakably a husky.

There are numerous breeds and breed mixes that look a lot like coyotes or wolves. They're probably not. There's also plenty of people on the internet who say their dog is mixed with a wolf or coyote, but they're super friendly and pretty much act like a dog. They're probably a regular dog.
 

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You have a lovely husky. I have a friend on Facebook, she used to be active here, who DOES have a coydog, and trust me, they're unmistakable. Enjoy your very pretty husky girl and be grateful she isn't a hybrid, because while my friend loves hers dearly, they are NOT something the average dog owner is equipped to deal with.
I think I know who you are talking about (used to be on DobermanTalk, as well?), and yes, her hybrid is definitely different from a domestic dog, and very challenging to live with.
 

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I also know that person, and... yeah. Her coydog has an unmistakable look, and her behavior is not dog-like. If you've got a high content mix, you don't need to ask; you'll know.

True coydogs are fairly rare because a coyote would often rather kill a dog than mate with it.
 

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I also know that person, and... yeah. Her coydog has an unmistakable look, and her behavior is not dog-like. If you've got a high content mix, you don't need to ask; you'll know.

True coydogs are fairly rare because a coyote would often rather kill a dog than mate with it.
That is also true. Every coyote our dogs ever met wanted to kill our dogs, or our dogs wanted to kill them. Despite their similarities, they know they are not the same species!
 

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I think I know who you are talking about (used to be on DobermanTalk, as well?), and yes, her hybrid is definitely different from a domestic dog, and very challenging to live with.
Not sure about DobermanTalk, but she used to have a number of wolf hybrids as well.
 

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Not sure about DobermanTalk, but she used to have a number of wolf hybrids as well.
Hmm.. the person I'm thinking of only has the coy-dog, as well as a Doberman, so might not be the same person, then. Anyway, her coy-dog was/is very different from a regular dog.
 

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Hmm.. the person I'm thinking of only has the coy-dog, as well as a Doberman, so might not be the same person, then. Anyway, her coy-dog was/is very different from a regular dog.
She doesn't have the wolf dogs anymore, but she did at one point. I don't think she's ever owned a Doberman though. Her user name was Nekomi, if that helps. Finally remembered it, lol.
 

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She doesn't have the wolf dogs anymore, but she did at one point. I don't think she's ever owned a Doberman though. Her user name was Nekomi, if that helps. Finally remembered it, lol.
The person I'm thinking of used the name styric on a couple different forums, so that's probably what she would have used here, as well.

This is one of the threads where she talks about her coydog. https://www.dobermantalk.com/non-doberman-animal-talk/214057-strange-life-living-coydog.html
 
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