Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just got my puppy home and i was wondering....
how would it be a good way to correct undesirable behaviour.
Example: I don't want him to enter the house after a particular point and he's been chewing my mothers grass...

oh, one more thing... does anyone have an instructive video or text (please don't send me book names, I have enough school books to read hahah ) on how to use clickers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I´m sorry, I was in a hurry. What I mean is: The puppy/dog isn't allowed in the house, how can i train him to stay out of it? And how can I make him stop chewing our grass?
Thanks for your patience
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,406 Posts
I´m sorry, I was in a hurry. What I mean is: The puppy/dog isn't allowed in the house, how can i train him to stay out of it? And how can I make him stop chewing our grass?
Thanks for your patience
The puppy is not allowed in the house? That's going to make training much trickier. Generally, with clicker training, you are looking for things to reward, not things to "correct". I suspect he's probably chewing grass because out in the yard alone, it's about all there is to do (unless you'd prefer barking and digging)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,186 Posts
First off, outside dogs are a bad idea. Why even get a dog? Secondly, instead of concentrating on what you don't want a dog to do, teach him what you DO want him to do.

Eating grass is usually a sign of stomach upset. Dogs do it to make themselves throw up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
First off, outside dogs are a bad idea. Why even get a dog? Secondly, instead of concentrating on what you don't want a dog to do, teach him what you DO want him to do.

Eating grass is usually a sign of stomach upset. Dogs do it to make themselves throw up.
I second this ^
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I don't have the power to decide on that one. My fathers condition to having a dog is that he doesn't enter the house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,350 Posts
The best way to train good behavior, is to STOP the bad behavior before it even starts. You can't do that if you're not there to SEE what the dog is up to.

So, for example, IF the dog was allowed in the house, and you don't want him on the couch, every time you see him headed toward the couch, you'd interrupt him, distract him, so that he never gets there. If you do that EVERY time he heads near the couch, he'd never end up on the couch, and after awhile, he'd stop going near it, since it isn't in his "list" of things to do.

But, if the dog is outside, you probably won't be out with him often enough to do this kind of distraction. So, you'll have a dog that gets used to doing something you don't like. If he gets in the habit of doing something, because you aren't there to stop him, it will be harder to get him to stop it.

Chewing grass is a prime example. He will be out without you a lot. So, he may chew on the grass a lot. You can only stop him when you are there. (Anyway, they're right, eating grass can calm an upset stomach for dogs, so WHY he's doing it is the problem).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
What about this... when my dog tries to come in, i say a strict and firm "no". If he backs up I praise him. If not a drag him outside again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,406 Posts
What about this... when my dog tries to come in, i say a strict and firm "no". If he backs up I praise him. If not a drag him outside again.
Well dragging him outside will either teach him to allow himself to be dragged, or to avoid your hands. I feel funky about giving advice, because I think it is unfair to isolate a dog outside. Dogs are social creatures and need companionship. It would have been better if you could have waited to get a dog when you are on your own and able to make your own decisions. Yard ornament dogs frequently have behavior problems because they have no structure to their life and make their own entertainment - barking, digging, escaping, etc. and because when they do get to see a real live human, they are so excited they can't react calmly. That said, if you HAVE to keep the dog from crossing the doorway into the house, I'd simply walk toward him till he backs up, then praise the backing away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
I cannot imagine having a dog and keeping it outside all the time. I would think that make it very difficult to train the dog. Any puppy that I have known gets into mischief when left alone. They get bored and then they find things to do like chewing grass or digging holes or barking at everything. Depending on the puppy, it could get into a lot of trouble when its outside by itself. How much of the day would the dog be alone? Like the others said, its better to reward good behavior, otherwise the dog will think its name is "No".
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top