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Anyone who has owned coonhounds, particular Treeing Walkers, or is very familiar with them, I have a few questions. This is my first time with this particular breed of dog.

My puppy Abby is nearly 11 months old and she's a TWCH/Beagle mix. She is very mouthy. She's calmed quite a bit over the months that I've had her (adopted her when she was 5 months), but being half coonhound, she's very energetic and I know this is typical of the breed. Whenever she's in a playing mood, she likes to mouth me, especially my hands. I know she's only playing, but her teeth hurt. She also nibbles on my fingers after she kisses them. I've heard it's a sign of affection but again it tends to hurt. I've read the thread on preventing biting and I've tried various methods. The pulling my hand away and yelping basically does nothing at all. I've given her chew toys and it usually helps, but not all the time. Anyway my question is: is it typical of coonies to be mouthy like this, even as older puppies? My last dog was a purebred beagle and she stopped this by at least 5 months old. I take her on walks and it usually uses up her energy and makes her calmer, but there are times when it's hard to walk, like when it's very hot/humid outside.

Second question: She has all the TWCH instinct of treeing animals and barking, but her bark is a bit strange. It's like a hysterical, high-pitched, almost squeaky bark. I don't really know if it classifies as a bay, it's more like a chop bark but again high-pitched. Do coonhounds do this? Most of the videos I've seen of them treeing/hunting they don't sound much like this.

Third question: Is it typical of coonhounds, especially Walkers, to have sensitive digestive tracts? When I first adopted her (she is a rescue dog), they had fed her Iams dry puppy food. I started her on that and gradually changed over to Wellness (my beagle always ate that and was good with it). It gave her diarrhea, so the vet put her on a prescription diet that helped. I didn't want to keep her on that forever as it's a bit expensive and hard to get down to the vet's whenever I run out. Someone had recommended Natural Balance so I tried that and she was good for a little while, but again started with diarrhea. Someone mentioned trying a fish/sweet potato mix (also Natural Balance I believe), or Blue Buffalo grain-free turkey. Anyone else have any experience with this and have something you could recommend?

Sorry this post is so long and if I sound somewhat clueless, lol.. Like I said, first experience with this breed.
 

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I don't know about the behavioral stuff but nutritionally: I have been hearing a lot of people complain about wellness and your dog simply does not do well on it. Blue Buffalo is ok but not my favorite... Natural Balance also not a favorite.
Acana makes some really nice food as well as Orijen (Orijen is a lot richer and would have to be switched slowly). Horizon makes some great foods.. you could check out dogfoodchat.com as well. Great resource.
Good luck in your quest!
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
None of that was typical with my walker. She would not mouth at all, was quiet unless baying, and could eat anything :)
Thanks for the input. :) Hmm, I suspect it's because she's still a puppy and it's worse when she doesn't get to exhaust all her energy supply. At least I'm hoping so. Maybe the sensitive digestive thing varies from individual dog to dog. I never met her parents, but if they had problems like this I guess it wouldn't be out of the question for her, too.
 

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I don't know about the behavioral stuff but nutritionally: I have been hearing a lot of people complain about wellness and your dog simply does not do well on it. Blue Buffalo is ok but not my favorite... Natural Balance also not a favorite.
Acana makes some really nice food as well as Orijen (Orijen is a lot richer and would have to be switched slowly). Horizon makes some great foods.. you could check out dogfoodchat.com as well. Great resource.
Good luck in your quest!
Thanks for the advice, I really appreciate it! Wow, didn't know that about Wellness. I'll check out those other brands and that site. Thanks again!
 

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Thanks for the input. :) Hmm, I suspect it's because she's still a puppy and it's worse when she doesn't get to exhaust all her energy supply. At least I'm hoping so. Maybe the sensitive digestive thing varies from individual dog to dog. I never met her parents, but if they had problems like this I guess it wouldn't be out of the question for her, too.
I agree. They do have lots of stamina. I don't consider them high drive, but I own Malinois, so... Lol. My walker was found starved, with her muzzle and legs taped together with duct tape, so I presume she had been abused. Though she showed no fear towards humans.
For sure the digestive issues can be individual.
 

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The last Redbone Coonhound I knew was very mouthy. It was aggravating to say the least, and it seemed like nothing would stop him.
However, all the Walkers I've ever had have never really been mouthy. Occasionally they would mouth in play or something, but it wasn't common.
As for the bay, I've heard coonhounds do a very high pitched bark/howl sort of bay when they're excited and especially before they finish maturing.
 

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I have a suspected (unconfirmed) Plott hound.

She was about one when we got her and she has never been mouthy. She licks everybody and everything, though.

She doesn't sound like other hounds I've had or been around. A Plott's bay is rather high and not particularly melodic. Her bark, on the other hand, is deep and thunderous (and, fortunately, seldom used.) Other Plotts I've heard sound like they are being tortured. Other dogs are embarassed by the bay of a Plott.

I would not describe her stomache as delicate. She can eat nearly anything and only gets grain-free because our other dog seems to need it. I believe Esther could probably live off the land and thrive. (She's experimented with this a few times, to the detriment of area wildlife.)

Her stamina, and that of her breed, is legendary. I will probably die from exhaustion before she slows down much, but - at age seven - she manages her energy a little better.

I can't imagine this information will help you much, but I've enjoyed sharing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I agree. They do have lots of stamina. I don't consider them high drive, but I own Malinois, so... Lol. My walker was found starved, with her muzzle and legs taped together with duct tape, so I presume she had been abused. Though she showed no fear towards humans.
For sure the digestive issues can be individual.
Sorry for the late reply, for some reason I never got any notifications for the last few posts. Anyway... aww, poor thing :( I'm glad that she didn't show any fear, especially if she'd been abused like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
The last Redbone Coonhound I knew was very mouthy. It was aggravating to say the least, and it seemed like nothing would stop him.
However, all the Walkers I've ever had have never really been mouthy. Occasionally they would mouth in play or something, but it wasn't common.
As for the bay, I've heard coonhounds do a very high pitched bark/howl sort of bay when they're excited and especially before they finish maturing.
It's weird because she doesn't mouth all the time, mostly in play. I can tell when she's in a very playful mood because when I go to pet her, she'll open that mouth of hers and try to mouth my hand/fingers. But she's fine when she's quiet.

Ah, that sounds just like her. Makes sense. Odd thing is that she really doesn't howl much. Sometimes when she's barking at someone going by, it'll be like a "woo woo wooo" type thing. The only time she *really* howls is whenever I'm watching a video of other dogs howling. She'll howl right along with them. That's about it though.

I have a video of her from a couple months back doing the high pitched bark thing as she treed a squirrel:

RonE, thanks very much for sharing that info. It was very interesting. :) Abby has a few different barks. She has the sort of deep warning/watchdog type bark, like "woof woof woof!" Then sometimes it'll sound almost like a howl, and finally the excited, high-pitched bark when she trees an animal. Lol, I've had the same thoughts about dying from exhaustion due to Abby's stamina, but she seems to have calmed a bit more recently. If I take her for two long walks during the day, she's very quiet and laid back (well sometimes she'll get the urge to play, but she'll just run around in the back yard or bring a toy for me to toss around with her).
 

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That is totally normal. Most walkers sound like that, and sometimes they will do the really low 'woof's
 

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Felt like sharing this while I was at it. Lol
This is a neighbor's Redbone Coonhound, angry because apparently I'm not allowed to wade in water.

He has a very low bark, but I've heard him go very high at times. Each coonhound sounds at least a little bit different from the other.
 

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That is totally normal. Most walkers sound like that, and sometimes they will do the really low 'woof's
Good to know, thanks :) That's definitely her. I call her low "woofs" the "watchdog bark." Sometimes followed by a sort of threatening growl.

Lol, love the video! Your neighbor's Redbone is funny. When Abby spots an animal up a tree and has been barking a while, if I come near her she'll sometimes act like that toward me, lol. It is interesting how each coonhound ends up sounding a bit different from others.
 
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