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Again OP if you haven't yet, reach out to local agencies that deal with people who need service dogs, they will know the best places to look.
 

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You are the only one talking about puppy mills.
To clarify, I'm responding to this:

So should we leave those puppies wallowing in their own feces on the puppy farm? Those dogs are getting sold wether to good owners or bad. You'll never put a dent in the industry so I'd I can take a dog out of a bad place and give it a good life I've done more than if I'd taken a dog from a good place that is only selling to good places. AND the added benefit of not giving out my personal info to strangers on the internet.
I'll spell this out so you're not left wondering like last time: you're now temp banned due to repeated rudeness, disrespect for the rules even after a reasonable explanation was given, and combative attitude. The next ban will not be temporary.
 

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As I said above, I’ll be working with professional service dog trainers. The main reason I’m getting a service dog is medical alert/response for my autoimmune condition, not social anxiety, though the dog will also be trained to help alert/respond to some of my anxiety symptoms (panic/anxiety attacks and dissociation, primarily).
Hi, medusashep. One thing you might consider is that there are people and programs out specifically selectively breeding to produce medical alert dogs. It's quite a specialized skill set for a dog not all dogs, even from dogs from breeds that are gifted sniffers, have the aptitude for it. If you want to maximize your chances of success with the dog, you might look in this direction.

Also, one reason BRTs are not commonly used as service dogs for people with medical issues, even though they're highly trainable and handler-oriented, is that they tend to be exceedingly protective of their person and property. This can introduce a potentially dangerous situation if a person needs emergency intervention and the dog interprets it as an encroachment.

Just a few things to think about as you search. Good luck :)
 

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Hello! I’m 18 and currently looking for my first well-bred dog for a service prospect, and I’m not quite sure what to say to breeders. The following is what I currently have - would this be appropriate? Is there more information I should include or should I make it shorter? Any feedback is appreciated, thanks!



Hello,

My name is [name] and I’m looking for a service dog prospect. I came across your website while researching breeders and would love to learn more about, you, your breeding, and hopefully get a puppy from you.

I currently live with my parents and my childhood dog, an 11-year-old poodle/golden retriever. I’m a part time student with class twice a week for four hours - other than that, which the dog will hopefully accompany me to once training for public access, all my free time will be dedicated to training and socializing the puppy.

I’ve had an interest in Russian dog breeds for awhile, and came across the [breed] while researching larger dogs for service work. I’m also interested in showing and amateur sports, namely agility, barn hunt, scent work, flyball and dock diving, though I don’t have experience with any of these.

My only dog experience is with my childhood dogs, the aforementioned poodle/golden mix and a terrier mutt I grew up with, but I’m eager to learn and follow guidance.

Thank you for your time, I look forward to hearing back from you!
First, what service do you want this dog to do?
And service dogs are selected as puppies from lines that have shown ability for training and service. Then they are trained by expert trainers throughout their puppyhood. Then, if they are still considered for a job they are sold to a person needing them for that particular service.

The person needing the service doesn’t train the puppy themselves.
 

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The person needing the service doesn’t train the puppy themselves.
Actually, I knew a wheelchair-bound woman (deceased now) who trained several service dogs for herself over the years. And when I was investigating the Shiba Inu breed, I found the story of 2 different women who trained their Shibas as their service dogs themselves.
I didn't reread the story when I looked it up to post the link here, but as I remember both women were experienced owners. It's not something I'd try with a Shiba from what I know of the breed.

Anyway, there are people who do it themselves, but I really doubt it's a project for first time dog owners.
 

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Yup, the ADA in the US 100% allows owner trained service dogs. This is to improve access for people who need them. Program dogs can be expensive and have extremely long waiting lists, and many people have unique needs outside of what programs train for so would not be able to find a program dog that performs all the tasks they require. This also allows people to train dogs they already have if necessary, assuming the dog has an appropriate temperament, which is extremely helpful if their dog is already showing that they have, for example, a natural sense of when their owner is about to have a seizure, an ability that can be incredibly difficult to train for some types of seizures.

Lots of other countries only allow program trained dogs, though, and therefore only allow service dogs for specific disabilities (guide dogs being most common). The US is incredibly flexible in this way, which is pretty darn cool, especially for people with multiple disabilities who have extremely unique needs and can't be independent without an SD.
 

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I have friends with owner trained service dogs. Both of them have pretty unique needs that a program trained dog might not be able to meet. None of them are from lines bred for producing service dogs.
 
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