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I like the attempt at the graphic, but you were right ...people will always find fault. ;-)
1. When I train a behavior, I use clicker or capture-based methods, so it's fairly binary: Reward or no reward.
2. I don't get errorless training, but I don't delay or "withhold the rewards to decrease behavior"
3. After the behavior is understood, I go into a 'proofing' stage to fine tune the details, where I use a No reward marker.
4. My no reward marker may also be an interrupt sound, which is not quite a "no", but may be seen as correction.
5. For everyday activity and 'untrained' behaviors, I might be green or blue, if safety requires it.
6. Mikee is a TKE and a Therapy Dog. I don't really train him new behaviors any more, he mostly adapts to the situation as needed, but sometimes I have to 'correct' him by cuing a Sit, if he wants to touch someone who is fragile, but calls Mikee over. Mikee is large and can do 'damage' with a wagging tail, or an enthused lean, so in that case I have to help the people who want to pet him to go up to him [to hug him, etc.], rather than call him over for enthusiastic loving.
7. If Mikee is in everyday, off-leashing, romping, then I may have to call him off if he tries to play baby animals. Smaller dogs and other animals are fine, but babies may not be able to tell him 'too much!' I don't know if that is Green or Blue?
8. We had a very experienced gentleman who called himself purely correction-based. Given his knowledge base and his non-confrontational manner, I suspect that his corrections may have been gentler than reward withholding from others.
9. About 50 years ago, I had an old Colonel who used Koehler-based methods and used a choke chain. But, his corrections were precise, surgical moves - a ballet of beautiful communication. When he popped the leash, his timing was perfect with minimal force, and for most dogs, non-aversive like a light tap on the shoulder to be a gentle distraction. I watched him train a small terrier and then train my larger Lab-mix, and neither dog looked like they'd endured aversive methods ... just a distraction. On the other hand, the Colonel wasn't able to teach the rest of us to use his level of precision. I don't know what color he falls into.
10. Ian Dunbar is one of the grand masters of science based training. He used to describe training in a way that would fit the Blue category. Today, he might fall into the Yellow/Green category with a No Reward Marker [I think he came up with that concept?]

So, I guess there is a range: One color for first training new behaviors, maybe another color for fine-tuning and proofing, another color for everyday "trained" behavior, and possibly a fourth for off-leash, relaxed, play behavior?
 

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Yellowish-green. I use reinforcement when teaching and proofing a behavior; though correct using negative markers. ('No' or 'ah-ah') Though I do use aversives on some occasions, they are certainly not used to fine-tune each and every behavior, as sometimes they are just not necessary.
 
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