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We didn't do much research on caring and training a puppy until after we rescued one from a shelter and probably rushed the adoption more than we should have. We were taking advantage of our current time off while waiting to go back to work during the pandemic and felt the sooner we get one the more time we have to train one. Most of the shelters by me were closed to new adoptions and there was really only still doing them so our options were limited. Now that we have him we will care for him well and even hired a puppy trainer to help us. He is a handful but also loveable when he is behaving. I do know now that he was probably taken from his litter way to early because we adopted him when he was 8 weeks old and was probably in the shelter for weeks already missing out on important skills taught by mom and litter mates adding to some of the behavior issues we are trying to correct. Also we did a DNA test and the health portion reveals one gene variant for joint and spinal issues which we will monitor but most concerning is the 26% COI. I found out that this is extremely high. How concerned should I be and does anyone have positive experiences with a pup that also has very COI? We will keep him whatever the case is.
 

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Do you know any of his background? If he was from a hoarding situation or the like, it's possible that he is the result of several generations worth of first or second degree breedings.
 

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Do you know any of his background? If he was from a hoarding situation or the like, it's possible that he is the result of several generations worth of first or second degree breedings.
I have no history on him. I only know that he came from a kill shelter somewhere in Texas and we adopted him in NY from a rescue that went to get a bunch of these dogs.
 

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Really tight linebreeding is used to "set" traits in a breed that is being developed or a line within a breed. While it can set good traits like conformation and consistent size, it can also set bad ones like health problems, as well. Without knowing any of his background and the health of his ancestors, it's pretty much a coin toss as regards to his health. What breed (or mix) is he, do you know?
 

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Really tight linebreeding is used to "set" traits in a breed that is being developed or a line within a breed. While it can set good traits like conformation and consistent size, it can also set bad ones like health problems, as well. Without knowing any of his background and the health of his ancestors, it's pretty much a coin toss as regards to his health. What breed (or mix) is he, do you know?
I am waiting for the rest of the results which should be in today or tomorrow the latest. I will post them when they arrive.
 

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Sounds like you got something like the Embark health and breed DNA test. Typically you get the health results first and the breed info a day-or-two later.

I would print a copy of the health results and take them or send them to your vet for an opinion of the possible impact.
 

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Sounds like you got something like the Embark health and breed DNA test. Typically you get the health results first and the breed info a day-or-two later.

I would print a copy of the health results and take them or send them to your vet for an opinion of the possible impact.
I will, but we will not give up on him or send him back so it will be a useful tool to watch out for certain ailments. I am thinking if we never did the test we would never had known and there is probably a lot of people that don't know there dogs history.
 

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My boy as a COI right around there - he was from a hoarding situation and no doubt there was a lot of inbreeding going on there. My little man has pretty serious genetic anxiety/fear issues as well as joint problems - he's going to be getting knee surgery sometime soon.

That said, it's honestly hard to tell how bad things could be with inbreeding like that - sometimes things are totally fine, sometimes stuff hits the fan. Best of luck with your little pup!
 

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My boy as a COI right around there - he was from a hoarding situation and no doubt there was a lot of inbreeding going on there. My little man has pretty serious genetic anxiety/fear issues as well as joint problems - he's going to be getting knee surgery sometime soon.

That said, it's honestly hard to tell how bad things could be with inbreeding like that - sometimes things are totally fine, sometimes stuff hits the fan. Best of luck with your little pup!
Thank you, best of luck with yours. He is coming along well and we train him daily using techniques from our puppy training classes, lol. Have two more lessons to go. He had a first time play date with my friends 60lbs very playfully aggressive yellow lab with high energy which scared the crap out of him in the beginning. He did want to play after 3 hours and did actually play bark back and pawed lambs snout. He is not shy and receives people well. Very hard to socialize a puppy during this time of social distancing and he doesn't have all his vaccines, so we have to be careful.
 

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One thing to make sure of, since he's come back with a fairly high percentage of herding breeds, is that he doesn't have the MDR-1 mutation, and if he does have it, then using something other than ivermectin for heartworm prevention would be a good idea if he has the mutation, as ivermectin is one of the drugs most commonly associated with MDR-1 issues.
 

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Thanks, he did not have this gene. Out of all the genes they tested for this is the only one that came back positive and only has one copy of it..... Chondrodystrophy and Intervertebral Disc Disease, CDDY/IVDD, Type I IVDD (FGF4 retrogene CFA12)
 
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