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Teach "Give" for all kinds of objects- you don't want to have to take an object (either something the dog shouldn't have like a shoe or a book, or a chewy treat which is done for the day) from the dog but rather to ask for it and have the dog give it to you. You can teach this by trading up- basically give the dog something of low value (to start with) like a simple toy. Then offer a treat and say "GIVE", if the dog drops the toy, give the treat. Give the toy back, repeat. Build up to asking for the dog to GIVE higher value objects like a Kong with peanut butter in it, a bully stick or a pigs ear. You want to show the dog that you don't just take items away randomly; you don't want her to feel like she needs to guard what is hers.

I walked into the room she started to growl at me. I scolded her and she stopped.
But as I walked past her to go clear the kitchen table she actually snapped at me and nipped my foot. I took the pig ear away immediately and gave a very loud and firm NO! but now wondering what the next step is.
never punish a growl. She is telling you "Hey, I don't like whatever you are doing" and if you punish her form of communication, as you learned, she will move to the next form of communication for her to protect her treat- nipping at you.

Personally, I wouldn't give any high value treat to a puppy or young dog around kids. Put the dog in a crate or in its own room for a high value treat (and the dog herself defines "high value") You'll need to build a solid background of both GIVE and in the dog's understanding that sometimes treats have to go away but that she gets them back later or she gets other good things to happen.

Here's a bit I wrote in another thread on resource guarding to help illustrate:
Think of it this way.
You are holding something you like. Let's say a candy bar. Your boss walks up and grabs the candy bar and take it away. First time, you let it happen and just go get another candy bar from the machine. Boss grabs that one away and smacks your hand. You get annoyed. Get another candy bar. Boss walks up, grabs the candy bar, you cling to the candy bar so he yanks your hand away and then smacks it. Now, the next time you have a candy bar and the boss reaches for it, you're likely to go ballistic on him, right? Verbally maybe as a human, but a dog's way of "yelling" at that point is by biting.

Now change the scene a little bit. You have a candy bar, boss walks up holding a pizza and says "Trade?" You say SURE. You're not going to be all that focused on a candy bar anymore with your new pizza. Maybe you get another candy bar though the next day, boss offers a trade, you take it. Maybe the next time the boss just asks for the candy bar without offering a trade, but since you now trust him you will still be provided with something good later, you give it up voluntarily. Once the concept of "trading up" is established, you don't ALWAYS have to trade up, you just need to trade up often enough to keep the "promise" that reliquishing items isn't a bad thing.

The higher value object the dog has, the more you have to train the trade up and the higher the value of the trade. "Value" is determined by the dog- some dogs are nuts for tennis balls and won't even drop them for steak bits but don't care at all for tug ropes and will hand them over in exchange for kibble.
 

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(Just FYI, the little analogy was written in another thread in response to someone who did smack the dog)

The growling is her telling you to back off and leave her alone. Rather than scolding for a growl or trying to stop her from growling, look at it more as stopping her from feeling the NEED to growl. You teach the kid that they don't need to scream to get their message across- maybe teaching them that they can say something nicely or get up and walk away or whatever appropriate behavior. So you decide what you want the dog to do; the growling isn't the problem, it is the guarding of an object which she is telling you that she is guarding by growling. Maybe you want to her walk away and chew the toy in her crate, so you teach a command of GO TO BED (for example) and when she starts to chew a treat in a busy area, you can tell her to GO TO BED.

Since a dog has a lot less ability to "say" something than a child, a dog's growl is shout, scream, whine, complaint, mope etc when compared to a kid.

As an aside, lots of dogs growl when they really get into playing with something like tug and running around and "attacking" a toy in the yard etc. You just have to listen and know your dog to tell if the dog is just really excited and play growling (like "Yum, grr, yum") or growling to guard ("Leave me alone, grr")
 
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