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My 1 1/2 year old dog, Paige, developed Cherry Eye. I took her to the vet and the gave me some drops however they didn't work. I have heard that the surgery causes dry eyes. Is there another alternative that will make her eyes "normal"?

(There may already be threads for this, can someone post a link? Thanks)
 

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The surgery might cause dry eye, but that's unlikely with an experienced surgeon. The cherry eye certainly isn't going to resolve on its own without surgery.
 

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I adopted a cocker who had cherry eye in both eyes from day one so I was forced to learn all about it. Years ago some vets simply removed the lower tear gland that pops out and as a result the eye had less total capacity to tear and sometimes that led to dry eye.

Nowadays I think almost all vets stitch the gland back in place. The problem is that the gland can pop out again. It varies from dog to dog and perhaps a ophthalmologist can do a better job than a general vet. Prices for the procedure are all over the place. We had ours done by a general vet at the same time as a dental cleaning which cost us less overall. One of the eyes was ok and the other popped out again in six months. We never had that eye done again and he didn't seem to mind it for the several years longer he was with us.

It's not something you have to rush to take care of so I would suggest shopping around and consider having it done along with any other procedure that might require anesthesia.
 

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We had a Lhasa Apso with cherry eye, unfortunately it can grow back after surgery. It was a nightmare of smelly secretions, constant infections, and eventually total blindness. If I had it to do over again, I would not get a puppy who exhibited this problem.
 

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Unfortunately eye drops will not work. The only solution is surgery. Simple gland excision may cause dry eye, so the surgical replacement of the gland into its normal position is the recommended procedure. In a few dogs the gland may prolapse again and the surgery my have to be repeated. It is a simple procedure for a veterinary ophthalmologist.
 

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I will give you advice I found in my Vet Book. I call it the Bible.

Causes:
Cherry eye is a term used to describe the pink, shiny protrusion that appears in the corner of the dogs eye when the tear gland becomes infected. The condition is not usually dangerous.

Treatment:
Antibiotics often cure this condition. Sometimes, however, surgery is required to re-position the gland. Because tears are essential for ridding the eye of harmful agents, the vet will do everything possible to save the gland.

Of course there a such things as artificial tears.
 

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Cherry eye is not caused by an infection in the tear gland. Cherry eye is a prolapse of the third eyelid that occurs because the ligament that normally holds it in place is not doing so, allowing it to pop out.
 

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You do not have to have the tear duct removed (that's what causes dry eye) you can have the tear duct tacked to the orbit, which preserves the duct and prevents dry eye. Make sure you take her to a vet that does the tack procedure often (one with a large English Bulldog clientele will know the procedure well).
 

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might cause dry eye is right...and dry eye is a fair trade for the abrasion injuries Cherry Eye can cause.
Though Cherry Eye can be a temporary condition. We have seen it in hound dogs come and go all on its own. Sometimes it is a recurring problem, other times comes in once and goes away forever. Our Daisy ( Beagle) got Cherry Eye all the sudden when she was about three...vet gave us some drops which did not help but did make he more comfortable...we scheduled surgery and the day before it went away...came back once when she was about 5 for a week or two...went away and have not come back in 10 years.
Though in some breeds who are known to be prone to it...I am sure it is a more difficult and chronic problem.
 
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