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Discussion Starter #1
Meet Chase, my wolfdog. He's still living with his breeder and mommy at this very moment, but will come live with my between February 1 and February 24. Hopefully on February 1 or the first week of February :)

Name: Chase
Birth date: Somewhere around January 2, 2013
Wolf percentage: 75% (according to the breeder, he's a higher mid content)
Mother: Timber/Tundra/British Colombian wolf X husky
Father: Arctic wolf X malamute (with some Mackenzie Valley Wolf blood)
Height: His adult height will be between 30'' and 34'' at the shoulder, and around 5'5''-5'7'' when standing on his hind legs.
Weight: His adult weight will be between 100 and 140 pounds.

Here is what Chase will look like (similarly) when he'll be an adult, according to the breeder (the wolfdogs in the pictures are his stormy.jpg brother and sister of last year's litter) and himself, in the first picture (with his sibling, who has the pure white color of his grandfather, the Arctic Wolf!)
availablemale1 2weeks2.jpg Nash.jpg samara.jpg phantom.jpg

I will update this thread with pictures of Chase as he grows and turns into a beautiful adult!
 

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Chase was born Jan 2nd? He should not be home with you til at least March 2nd.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
They are all siblings of Chase. And the fourth is not a dog, it's a mid content wolfdog, 75% wolf.
The picture might be bad, here's 3 pictures where you can see clearly what she looks like.

PS: An animal's content can't be judged by a picture, for I have seen her in real life and she's just not the type that looks herself in pictures http://www.thedarkforestgroup.com/files/Effective_Wolfdog_Phenotyping_w97watermarked.pdf even says here wolfdogs shouldn't be phenotyped by pictures

samara howling.jpg samara out.jpg samara toy.jpg

EDIT: Most upper mid and high content wolfdogs, as well as other exotics such as foxes, bobcats, etc. are usually adopted and brought home when they're around 1 month - 1 month and a bit old, because they have these ''wild'' instincts and must get the proper bonding with their owner. That's also why most (really) exotics do bad when rehomed after a few years of living with the same owner. And I said he was born around Jan 2, but he might have been born a week earlier. I'm really not sure!
 

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Yeah, the pictures are bad, but in the bad pictures of the dog labeled Samara I'm not seeing "75% content" WD. The site you linked said it is recommended in person. Well, sure, it's recommended to evaluate any thing in person. Just my thoughts. Here is a better resource for you, and if you contact them they will even recommend someone experienced to do phenotyping in person: http://texx-wolf-tails.webs.com/highcontentwolfdogs.htm
 

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Chase was born Jan 2nd? He should not be home with you til at least March 2nd.
If I'm not mistaken, wolf-dog pups are sent to owners earlier than dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
ThoseWordsAreBest, I will contact those from Texx wolves and see what they have to say! And HollowHaven, that's exact!
 

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I cannot comment about what age wolfdogs get adopted at, but I will say that I have known quite a few people with questionable lower content wolfdogs. Most of them never barked and acted a little odd but could have easily passed for a husky/malamute, etc. Before I adopted my two I found a nice shepherd online that was advertised as a wolf mix and honestly, it just looked like a funky shepherd mix to me so I didn't think much of it. However, when I saw it in person, it was clearly high content - no curve to the tail, tracked in a line, and very minimal stop at the forehead. It definitely did not move like a dog - it's topline stayed pretty still and it had no side to side action like a dog, just much more fluid movement. He was very friendly but paced and had an intense stare..kind of made you a little uncomfortable. That being said, I always take "wolf hybrid" with a grain of salt...I feel like most of them are probably just husky crosses.
 

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Yeah, there are A LOT of bad "wolfdog" breeders out there who have no wolf at all in their lines. That's why we're always so skeptical here... it's not because we don't trust new posters or think they're dumb or anything, it's because we get many posts per year where people talk about their 50% or 75% wolfdogs and post up pics of GSD/husky mixes or malamute mixes or whatever else. Sometimes it's easy to tell (pups look like dog pups, not wolf pups, when born; they're born in the wrong season; the adult dogs have blue eyes, etc.), and sometimes it's harder.

I don't know enough about wolfdogs to judge, most of the time, which is why I like it when our resident experts stop by. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Interesting - do you know the reasoning behind that?
Most upper mid and high content wolfdogs, as well as other exotics such as foxes, bobcats, etc. are usually adopted and brought home when they're around 1 month - 1 month and a bit old, because they have these ''wild'' instincts and must get the proper bonding with their owner. That's also why most (really) exotics do bad when rehomed after a few years of living with the same owner. And I said he was born around Jan 2, but he might have been born a week earlier. I'm really not sure!

Copy/pasted this.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yeah, there are A LOT of bad "wolfdog" breeders out there who have no wolf at all in their lines. That's why we're always so skeptical here... it's not because we don't trust new posters or think they're dumb or anything, it's because we get many posts per year where people talk about their 50% or 75% wolfdogs and post up pics of GSD/husky mixes or malamute mixes or whatever else. Sometimes it's easy to tell (pups look like dog pups, not wolf pups, when born; they're born in the wrong season; the adult dogs have blue eyes, etc.), and sometimes it's harder.

I don't know enough about wolfdogs to judge, most of the time, which is why I like it when our resident experts stop by. :)
I completely understand! The breeder I'm getting Chase from is reputable, and has bred wolfdogs since 2007. We're friends, and that's why I decided to get mine from her. This is her last litter of upper mid content wolfdogs; she just bought a few months ago, a pure British Colombian wolf, and she's now planning on breeding only high contents (in the 90's%) :)
 

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Those look similar to dark(dirty) faced/agouti Siberian Huskies or Siberian mixes (no wolf, however) and each of those dogs pictured has the more traditional Irish markings (white chests, undersides and down the legs) - that is not typically associated with most mid - higher content wolf dogs (from my understanding)
 

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Oh, I did not know that. I wonder why the difference?
The reply is up a couple posts:
luccistar
Most upper mid and high content wolfdogs, as well as other exotics such as foxes, bobcats, etc. are usually adopted and brought home when they're around 1 month - 1 month and a bit old, because they have these ''wild'' instincts and must get the proper bonding with their owner. That's also why most (really) exotics do bad when rehomed after a few years of living with the same owner. And I said he was born around Jan 2, but he might have been born a week earlier. I'm really not sure!
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Those look similar to dark(dirty) faced/agouti Siberian Huskies or Siberian mixes (no wolf, however) and each of those dogs pictured has the more traditional Irish markings (white chests, undersides and down the legs) - that is not typically associated with most mid - higher content wolf dogs (from my understanding)
Niraya, here are, directly from Texx-wolf-tails's webpage, mid content wolfdogs with "Irish markings" http://texx-wolf-tails.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=65720500
http://texx-wolf-tails.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=65718418
http://texx-wolf-tails.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=65718421
http://texx-wolf-tails.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=116974893

so yes, wolfdogs that are mid - high can have these types of markings and colors. Actually, timber wolves (pure ones) actually have a bit of the Irish markings, but in a lighter color.
And actually, they are really not like huskies - if you study their ears, muzzles, forehead, eyes (color and shape) elbows, paws, legs, chest, shoulders and back, you will see that they have nothing -or almost nothing- in common with pure huskies. :)
 

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Please note that I said -not typically associated with- as that was my understanding but thank you for the links.

I still very much stand by what I said about dark faced/agouti dogs from the pictures. /shrug
 

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In all curiousity, what is the point in having such an animal? Especially 90% ?? What do you do with this animal in terms of training? I'm assuming (dangerous I know), that you don't just walk into the local obedience training club with a wolfdog / hybrid / mix or whatever the right term is? Or that you walk a wolf? I've always wondered these things, but never bothered to ask.
 

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Honestly, I think it's irresponsible to breed high contents in general. The majority of people are not going to be able to handle them. They need secure containment that must be specially built. They won't be housepets. They will go through winter wolf syndrome. It's like owning a zoo animal. Lower contents (and I gather some mid-contents) can make better pets because they act more like dogs, but a high content is going to act like a wolf.

However, a hybrid out of a pure wolf should be considered more difficult to work with. Most "first generation" animals are generally less suited as a good pet by most people's standards and expectations. These "poorer pet-quality" animals often do not "work out," for such hybrids generally exceed the ability of most people to socialize, contain, and generally provide a safe home. The same can be said of hybrids whose pedigrees indicate a wolf-content somewhere above 50% wolf. This is of course assuming that the pedigree is accurate and does not misrepresent the wolf-content.
There's a lot more info on the Wolf Park site. We also have a thread kicking around:

*It is recommended that WolfDogs be housed in an enclosure which is made from 8 ft. or higher 11 gauge chain link fencing with overhangs and underground dig guards and a minimum of 1600 sq. ft. of floor space.
*It is recommended that you provide your WolfDog with the companionship of either another WolfDog or canine. These are social animals and do not thrive alone.
*It is recommended that you provide Your WolfDogs with adequate mental stimulation in the form of toys, raised platforms for lounging, perhaps a kiddie pool etc etc...these are extremely intelligent animals who will attempt escape if not provided adequate stimulation.
Nekomi also shared some info in this post.
 
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